Sidor som bilder
PDF
ePub

In maintaining tative of the equitable sporter req

tion or group that does not have the internationally recognized

attributes of statehood, during any period in which such membership is effective. SEC. 411. UNITED NATIONS SECURITY COUNCIL MEMBERSHIP. (a) FINDINGS.—The Congress makes the following findings:

(1) The effectiveness of the United Nations Security Council in maintaining international peace and security depends on its being representative of the membership of the United Nations.

(2) The requirement of equitable geographic distribution in Article 23 of the United Nations Charter requires that the members of the Security Council of the United Nations be chosen by nondiscriminatory means.

(3) The use of informal regional groups of the General Assembly as the sole means for election of the nonpermanent members of the Security Council is inherently discriminatory in the absence of guarantees that all member states will have the opportunity to join a regional group, and has resulted in

discrimination against Israel. (b) SENSE OF CONGRESS.—It is the sense of Congress that the President should direct the Secretary of State to request the Secretary General of the United Nations to seek immediate resolution of the problem described in this section. The President shall inform the Congress of any progress in resolving this situation, together with the submission to Congress of the request for funding for the “Contributions to International Organizations” account of the Department of State for the fiscal year 1995. SEC. 412. REFORMS IN THE WORLD HEALTH ORGANIZATION.

(a) SENSE OF THE CONGRESS.-It is the sense of the Congress that United States contributions to the World Health Organization (WHO) should be utilized in the most effective and efficient manner possible, particularly for the reduction of diseases and disabilities in developing countries.

(b) POLICY.-The President shall direct the United States representatives to the World Health Assembly, the Executive Board, and the World Health Organization to monitor the activities of the World Health Organization to ensure that such organizations achieve

(1) the timely implementation of reforms and management improvements, including those outlined in the resolutions of the 46th World Health Assembly related to the external Audi. tor (WHA 46.21), the Report of the Executive Board on the WHO Response to Global Change (WHA 46.16) and actions for Budgetary Reform (WHA 46.35); and

(2) the effective and efficient utilization and monitoring of resources, including

(A) the determination of strategic and financial priorities; and

(B) the establishment of realistic and measurable targets

in accordance with the established health priorities. SEC. 413. REFORMS IN THE FOOD AND AGRICULTURE ORGANIZATION.

In light of the longstanding efforts of the United States and the other major donor nations to reform the Food and Agriculture Organization (FAO) and the findings of the ongoing investigation of the General Accounting Office, the Congress makes the following declarations:

(1) It should be the policy of the United States to promote the following reforms in the Food and Agriculture Organization:

(A) Decentralization of the administrative structure of FAO, including eliminating redundant or unnecessary headquarters staff, increased responsibilities of regional of fices, increased time for consideration of budget issues by member states, and a more meaningful and direct role for member states in the decision making process.

(B) Reform of the FAQ Council, including formation of an executive management committee to provide oversight of management.

(C) Limitation of the term of the Director General and the number of terms which an individual may serve.

(D) Restructuring of the Technical Cooperation Program (TCP), including reducing the number of nonemergency projects funded through the TCP and establishing procedures to deploy TCP consultants, supplies, and equipment

in a timely manner. (2) In an effort to increase the presence of United States personnel at the international food agencies and to enhance the professionalism of these institutions, it should be the policy of the United States, to the maximum extent practicable, to utilize existing personnel programs such as the United States Department of Agriculture Associate Professional Officer program to place United States personnel with unique skills in the Food and Agriculture Organization, the International Fund for Agri

cultural Development, and the World Food Program. SEC. 414. SENSE OF CONGRESS REGARDING ADHERENCE TO UNITED

NATIONS CHARTER.
It is the sense of the Congress that,

(1) the President should seek an assurance from the Secretary General of the United Nations that the United Nations will comply with Article 100 of the United Nations Charter;

(2) neither the Secretary General of the United Nations nor his staff should seek or receive instructions from any government or from any other authority external to the United Nations; and

(3) the President should report to Congress when he receives such assurance from the Secretary General of the United Na

tions. SEC. 415. DESIGNATED CONGRESSIONAL COMMITTEES.

For purposes of this part, the term "designated congressional committees means e Comitise on Appropriations and the Com. mittee on Pore an Pra: 25.5 of the Senate and the Committee on Appropriatims and the C615mine on Foreign Affairs of the House of Representeres.

[ocr errors][ocr errors]

sticement on State and Local Tount:

PART B-GENERAL PROVISIONS AND OTHER

INTERNATIONAL ORGANIZATIONS SEC. 421. AGREEMENT ON STATE AND LOCAL TAXATION.

The President is authorized to bring into force for the United States the Agreement on State and Local Taxation of Foreign Employees of Public International Organizations, which was signed by the United States on April 21, 1992, except that, notwithstanding the provisions of Article 1.B of such Agreement, such Agreement shall not require any refunds of monies paid with respect to tax years ending on or before December 31, 1993. SEC. 422. CONFERENCE ON SECURITY AND COOPERATION IN EU.

ROPE. The President is authorized to implement, for the United States, the provisions of Annex 1 of the Decision concerning Legal Capacity and Privileges and Immunities, issued by the Council of Ministers of the Conference on Security and Cooperation in Europe on December 1, 1993, in accordance with the terms of that Annex. SEC. 423.99 INTERNATIONAL BOUNDARY AND WATER COMMISSION. SEC. 424. UNITED STATES MEMBERSHIP IN THE ASIAN-PACIFIC ECO

NOMIC COOPERATION ORGANIZATION. (a) UNITED STATES MEMBERSHIP.—The President is authorized to maintain membership of the United States in the Asian-Pacific Economic Cooperation (APEC).

(b) PAYMENT OF ASSESSED CONTRIBUTIONS.—For fiscal year 1994 and for each fiscal year thereafter, the United States assessed contributions to APEC may be paid from funds appropriated for “Contributions to International Organizations”. SEC. 425. UNITED STATES MEMBERSHIP IN THE INTERNATIONAL

COPPER STUDY GROUP. (a) UNITED STATES MEMBERSHIP.-The President is authorized to accept the Terms of Reference of and maintain membership of the United States in the International Copper Study Group (ICSG).

(b) PAYMENTS OF ASSESSED CONTRIBUTIONS.-For fiscal year 1995 and thereafter the United States assessed contributions to the ICSG may be paid from funds appropriated for “Contributions to International Organizations”. SEC. 426.100 EXTENSION OF THE INTERNATIONAL ORGANIZATIONS

IMMUNITIES ACT TO THE INTERNATIONAL UNION FOR
CONSERVATION OF NATURE AND NATURAL RESOURCES.

SEC. 427. INTER-AMERICAN ORGANIZATIONS.

Taking into consideration the long-term commitment by the United States to the affairs of this Hemisphere and the need to build further upon the linkages between the United States and its neighbors, it is the sense of the Congress that the Secretary of State, in allocating the level of resources for international organiza

Sec. 423 amended various Public Laws relating to the International Boundary and Water Commission, United States and Mexico.

100 Sec. 426 amended the International Organizations Immunities Act (22 U.S.C. 288f-4) to classify the International Union for Conservation of Nature and Natural Resources as an international organization for purposes of that Act.

tions, should pay particular attention to funding levels of the InterAmerican organizations. SEC. 428. PROHIBITION ON CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE INTERNATIONAL

COFFEE ORGANIZATION. None of the funds authorized to be appropriated by this Act may be used to fund any United States contribution to the International Coffee Organization. SEC. 429. PROHIBITION ON CONTRIBUTIONS TO THE INTERNATIONAL

JUTE ORGANIZATION. None of the funds authorized to be appropriated by this Act may be used to fund any United States contribution to the International Jute Organization. SEC. 430.101 MIGRATION AND REFUGEE AMENDMENTS. * * * SEC. 431. WITHHOLDING OF UNITED STATES CONTRIBUTIONS FOR

CERTAIN PROGRAMS OF INTERNATIONAL ORGANIZA.

TIONS. (a) 102 * * * (b) 103 UNITED NATIONS DEVELOPMENT PROGRAM.

(1) Except as provided in paragraphs (2) and (3), for fiscal years 1994 and 1995 none of the funds made available for United Nations Development Program or United Nations Development Program-Administered Funds shall be available for programs and activities in or for Burma.

(2) Of the funds made available for United Nations Development Program and United Nations Development Program-Administered Funds for fiscal year 1994, $11,000,000 may be available only if the President certifies to the Congress that the United Nations Development Program's programs and activities in or for Burma promote the enjoyment of internationally guaranteed human rights in Burma and do not benefit the State Law and Order Restoration Council (SLORC) military regime.

(3) Of the funds made available for United Nations Development Program and United Nations Development Program-Administered Funds for fiscal year 1995, $27,600,000 may be available only if the President certifies to the Congress that,

(A) the United Nations Development Program has approved or initiated no new programs and no new funding for existing programs in or for Burma since the United Nations Development Program Governing Council (Executive Board) meeting of June 1993,

(B) such programs address unforeseen urgent humanitarian concerns, or

(C) a democratically elected government in Burma has agreed to such programs.

101 Sec. 430 amended the Migration and Refugee Assistance Act of 1962 (22 U.S.C. 2601), and repealed sec. 745 of Public Law 100-204 (22 U.S.C. 2601 note).

102 Subsec. (a) amended sec. 307 of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 (22 U.S.C. 2227); see Legislation on Foreign Relations Through 1994, vol. I-A.

103 Functions vested in the President in sec. 431(b) were delegated to the Secretary of State (Presidential memorandum of July 26. 1994; 59 F.R. 40205), and further delegated to the Assistant Secretary for International Organization Affairs (Department of State Public Notice 2086; sec. 10 of Delegation of Authority No. 214; 59 F.R. 50790).

TITLE V-FOREIGN POLICY

PART A GENERAL PROVISIONS SEC. 501.104 UNITED STATES POLICY CONCERNING OVERSEAS ASSIST.

ANCE TO REFUGEES AND DISPLACED PERSONS. (a) STANDARDS FOR REFUGEE WOMEN AND CHILDREN.—The United States Government, in providing for overseas assistance and protection of refugees and displaced persons, shall seek to address the protection and provision of basic needs of refugee women and children who represent 80 percent of the world's refugee population. As called for in the 1991 United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) “Guidelines on the Protection of Refugee Women”, whether directly, or through international organizations and nongovernmental voluntary organizations, the Secretary

[ocr errors]

tions and non seek to ensure on the part of the female prote

(1) specific attention on the part of the United Nations and relief organizations to recruit and employ female protection officers;

(2) implementation of gender awareness training for field staff including, but not limited to, security personnel;

(3) the protection of refugee women and children from violence and other abuses on the part of governments or insurgent groups;

(4) full involvement of women refugees in the planning and implementation of (A) the delivery of services and assistance, and (B) the repatriation process;

(5) incorporation of maternal and child health needs into refugee health services and education, specifically to include education on and access to services in reproductive health and birth spacing;

(6) the availability of counseling and other services, grievance processes, and protective services to victims of violence and abuse, including but not limited to rape and domestic violence;

(7) the provision of educational programs, particularly literacy and numeracy, vocational and income-generation skills training, and other training efforts promoting self-sufficiency for refugee women, with special emphasis on women heads of household;

(8) education for all refugee children, ensuring equal access for girls, and special services and family tracing for unaccompanied refugee minors;

(9) the collection of data that clearly enumerate age and gender so that appropriate health, education, and assistance programs can be planned;

(10) the recruitment, hiring, and training of more women program professionals in the international humanitarian field; and

(11) gender-awareness training for program staff of the United Nations High Commissioner for Refugees (UNHCR) and nongovernmental voluntary organizations on implementation

104 22 U.S.C. 2601 note.

« FöregåendeFortsätt »