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strategic offensive arms agreements on the long-term security interests of the United States and its allies; and

(B) should consult with Congress before making any change in that policy; and (5) any decision by the President to continue the existing United States no-undercut policy beyond December 31, 1986, should be a matter for consultation between the President and

Congress and for subsequent review and debate by Congress. (b) REQUIREMENT FOR REPORT.-Not later than February 1, 1986, the President shall submit to Congress a report containing the following:

(1) A range of projections and comparisons, on a year-by-year basis, of United States and Soviet strategic weapons dismantlements that would be required over the next five years if the United States and the Soviet Union were to adhere to a policy of not undercutting existing strategic arms control agreements.

(2) A range of projections and comparisons, on a year-by-year basis, of likely United States and Soviet strategic offensive force inventories over the next five years assuming a termination at the end of 1985 in the current no-undercut policy.

(3) An assessment of the possible Soviet political, military, and negotiating responses to the termination of the United States no-undercut policy.

(4) Recommendations regarding the future of United States interim restraint policy. (c) PROPOSAL OF MEASURES. If the President finds and reports to Congress that,

(1) the Soviet Union has violated the provisions of any strategic arms agreement; and

(2) such violations impair or threaten the security of the

United States, the President may propose to Congress such measures as he considers necessary to protect the security of the United States.

(d) SCOPE OF POLICY.—Nothing in this section shall be construed

(1) to restrain or inhibit the constitutional powers of the President;

(2) to endorse unilateral United States compliance with existing strategic arms agreements;

(3) as prohibiting the United States from carrying out proportionate responses to Soviet undercutting of strategic arms provisions;

(4) as prohibiting or delaying the development, flight testing, or deployment of the small intercontinental ballistic missile (SICM)1 as authorized by law; or

(5) as establishing a precedent to continue the no-undercut policy beyond December 31, 1986.

1 Should read "SICBM".

SEC. 1002.8 ANNUAL REPORT ON SOVIET COMPLIANCE WITH ARMS

CONTROL COMMITMENTS (a) ANNUAL REPORT.-Not later than December 1 of each year, the President shall submit to Congress a report containing the findings of the President with respect to the compliance of the Soviet Union with its arms control commitments and any additional information necessary to keep Congress currently informed.

(b) MATTERS TO BE INCLUDED.—The President shall specifically include in each such report the following:

(1) A summary of the current status of all arms control agreements in effect between the United States and the Soviet Union.

(2) An assessment of all violations by the Soviet Union of such agreements and the risks such violations pose to the national security of the United States and its allies.

(3) A net assessment of the aggregate military significance of all such violations.

(4) A statement of the compliance policy of the United States with respect to violations by the Soviet Union of those agreements.

(5) What actions, if any, the President has taken or proposes to take to bring the Soviet Union into compliance with its commitments under those agreements. (c) CONTINGENT ADDITIONAL INFORMATION.—If the President in any second consecutive report submitted to Congress under this section reports that the Soviet Union is not in full compliance with all arms control agreements between the United States and the Soviet Union, the President shall include in such report an assessment of what actions are necessary to compensate for such violations.

(d) CLASSIFICATION OF REPORTS.-Each report under this section shall be submitted in both classified and unclassified versions. SEC. 1003. STUDY OF ARMS CONTROL VERIFICATION CAPABILITIES

(a) INTERAGENCY STUDY.—The President shall provide for an interagency study with the purpose of determining possible avenues for cooperation between the United States and the Soviet Union in the development of capabilities not subject to national security restrictions for verification of compliance with arms control agreements.

(1) limited exchanges of data and scientific personnel; and

(2) the conduct of a joint technological effort in the area of seismic monitoring. (b) AGENCIES INCLUDED.—The President shall provide for participation in the interagency study under subsection (a) by

(1) the Secretary of State;
(2) the Secretary of Defense;

2 Sec. 905(a) of the National Defense Authorization Act, Fiscal Year 1989 (Public Law 100% 456; 102 Stat. 2032), amended and restated sec. 1002. It formerly read as follows:

"Not later than December 1, 1985, and not later than December 1 of each following year, the President shall submit to the Congress a report (in both classified and unclassified versions) containing, with respect to the compliance of the Soviet Union with its arms control commitments,

the President and an

and any additional information necessary to keep the Congress currently informed."

As stated by sec. 905(b) of Public Law 100_456, this amendment "shall take effect beginning with the report to be submitted under section 1002 of the Department of Defense Authorization Act, 1986, in 1990."

(3) the Secretary of Energy;
(4) the Director of the Arms Control and Disarmament Agen-

cy;

(5) the heads of appropriate intelligence agencies;
(6) the Joint Chiefs of Staff; and

(7) such other officers as the President may designate. (c) REPORT.-(1) The President shall submit to Congress a report on the results of the interagency study.

(2) The report shall be submitted in both a classified and unclassified version.

(3) The report shall be submitted not later than May 1, 1986. SEC. 1004. SENSE OF CONGRESS RELATING TO UNITED STATES-SO

VIET NEGOTIATIONS ON REDUCTION IN NUCLEAR ARMS It is the sense of the Congress

(1) that the President of the United States and the General Secretary of the Communist Party of the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics should be commended for their willingness to meet to discuss major issues in United States-Soviet relations; and

(2) that following thorough preparation, such meetings should be used to work for the realization of mutual, equitable,

and verifiable reductions in nuclear arms. SEC. 1005. PILOT PROGRAM FOR EXCHANGE OF CERTAIN HIGH-RANK

ING MILITARY AND CIVILIAN PERSONNEL WITH THE SO

| VIET UNION (a) SUBMISSION OF PLAN.—The Secretary of Defense shall submit to the appropriate committees of Congress a plan for the establishment and operation during fiscal year 1986 of a pilot program for the exchange of visits between

(1) high-ranking officers of the Armed Forces of the United States and high-ranking civilian officials of the Department of Defense; and

(2) corresponding high-ranking officers and officials of the Soviet Union. (b) REQUIREMENTS OF PLAN.-Such plan shall include

(1) specific identification of the United States officers and officials selected for participation in the program;

(2) the proposed length of the exchange visits with the Soviet Union;

(3) a description of the specific goals of each exchange visit;

(4) an estimate of the cost to the United States of participation in each visit;

(5) a description of any special actions that will be taken to protect classified information of the United States during any visit to the United States by officers or officials of the Soviet Union who are participating in the program; and

(6) any other details of the program that the Secretary considers appropriate. (c) AVAILABILITY OF FUNDS.–Of the funds appropriated pursuant to section 301(a), the sum of $100,000 shall be available only for costs required for participation by the United States in the pilot program described in subsection (a), including costs for travel, subsistence, and other support expenses.

(d) DEADLINE FOR PLAN.-The Secretary shall submit the plan required by subsection (a) not later than December 1, 1985. SEC, 1006. REPORT ON NUCLEAR WINTER FINDINGS AND POLICY IM

PLICATIONS: (a) CONTINUED PARTICIPATION IN INTERAGENCY STUDIES.-Notwith standing any limitation in any other provision of this Act, the Secretary of Defense, in accordance with section 1107(a) of the Department of Defense Authorization Act, 1985 (Public Law 98–525), shall participate in any comprehensive interagency study conducted on the atmospheric, climatic, environmental, and biological consequences of nuclear war and the implications that such consequences have for the nuclear weapons strategy and policy, the arms control policy, and the civil defense policy of the United States.

(b) REPORT ON NUCLEAR WINTER FINDINGS.—Not later than March 1, 1986, the Secretary of Defense shall submit to the Committees on Armed Services of the Senate and House of Representatives an unclassified report suitable for release to the public, together with classified addenda (if required), concerning the subject described in subsection (a). The Secretary shall include in such report the following:

(1) A detailed review and assessment of the findings in the current body of domestic and international scientific literature on the atmospheric, climatic, environmental, and biological consequences of nuclear explosions and nuclear exchanges.

(2) A thorough evaluation of the implications that such findings have on

(A) the nuclear weapons policy of the United States, especially with regard to strategy, targeting, planning, command, control, procurement, and deployment;

(B) the nuclear arms control policy of the United States; and

(C) the civil defense policy of the United States. (3) A discussion of the manner in which the results of such evaluation of policy implications will be incorporated into the nuclear weapons, arms control, and civil defense policies of the United States.

(4) An analysis of the extent to which current scientific findings on the consequences of nuclear explosions are being studied, disseminated, and used in the Soviet Union.

k. Department of Defense Authorization Act, 1985 Partial Text of Public Law 98-525 (HR. 6167), 98 Stat. 2492, approved October 19, 1984; as amended by Public Law 99-145 (Department of Defense Authorization Act, 1986; S. 1160), 99 Stat. 619, approved November 8, 1985; Public Law 99 661 (National Defense Authorization Act, Fiscal Year 1987, S. 2368) 100 Stat. 3816, approved November 14, 1986; and by Public Law 100-180 (National Defense Authorization Act for Fiscal Year 1988 and 1989, H.R. 1748), 101 Stat 1019, approved December 4, 1987

AN ACT To authorize appropriations for fiscal year 1985 for the military functions

of the Department of Defense, to prescribe military personnel levels for that fiscal year for the Department of Defense, and for other purposes.

Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled,

and Houstates strategiess whether thegic force planerability

TITLE XI–MATTERS RELATING TO ARMS CONTROL

REPORT ON STRATEGIC NUCLEAR SUBMARINE FORCE SEC. 1101. Not later than April 1, 1985, the Secretary of Defense shall submit to the Committees on Armed Services of the Senate and House of Representatives a report on the survivability of the United States strategic nuclear ballistic missile submarine force. The report shall address whether there are grounds for adjusting, in short or long-range terms, strategic force plans of the United States based on any vulnerability or potential vulnerability of such force. The report shall also examine the feasibility and desirability of enhancing the survivability of such force through measures that would affect antisubmarine warfare, including the nature of the patrols and the rules of engagement of attack submarines and the nature of the patrols and the rules of engagement of ballistic missile submarines.

ANNUAL REPORT ON STRATEGIC DEFENSE PROGRAMS SEC. 1102.1 * * * [Repealed—1987) REPORT ON THEATER NUCLEAR WEAPONS AND FORCE STRUCTURE Sec. 1103. Not later than January 19, 1985, the President shall submit to Congress a report setting forth reasons why the United States should or should not initiate a long-term program for the renovation of the North Atlantic Treaty Organization (NATO) nuclear deterrent in a manner designed to reduce pressures for early first use of tactical nuclear weapons and to substantially reduce the theater nuclear arsenal to types and numbers of weapons whose characteristics make for a more stable and credible force. The re

Sec. 1102 was repealed by sec. 231(b) of Public Law 100-180 (101 Stat. 1019).

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