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jective which is fully shared by my Government, and thereby further efforts of the Government of Lebanon to assure the safety of persons in the area and bring to an end the violence which has tragically recurred.

I have the further honor to inform you that my Government accepts the terms and conditions concerning the presence of the American force in the Beirut area as set forth in your note, and that Your Excellency's note and this reply accordingly constitute an agreement between our two Governments.

ROBERT DILLON,

U.S. Ambassador.

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2. Cuban Resolution Public Law 87-733 (S.J. Res. 230), 76 Stat. 697, approved October 3, 19621 JOINT RESOLUTION Expressing the determination of the United States with

respect to the situation in Cuba. Whereas President James Monroe, announcing the Monroe Doc

trine in 1823, declared that the United States would consider any attempt on the part of European powers to "extend their system to any portion of this hemisphere as dangerous to our peace and

safety"; and Whereas in the Rio Treaty of 1947 the parties agreed that "an

armed attack by any State against an American State shall be considered as an attack against all the American States, and, consequently, each one of the said contracting parties undertakes to assist in meeting the attack in the exercise of the inherent right of individual or collective self-defense recognized by article 51 of the Charter of the United Nations"; and Whereas the Foreign Ministers of the Organization of American

States at Punta del Este in January 1962 declared: "the present Government of Cuba has identified itself with the principles of Marxist-Leninist ideology, has established a political, economic, and social system based on that doctrine, and accepts military assistance from extracontinental Communist powers, including even the threat of military intervention in America on the part

of the Soviet Union”; and Whereas the International Communist movement has increasingly

extended into Cuba its political, economic, and military sphere of influence: Now, therefore, be it

Resolved by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled, That the United States is determined

(a) to prevent by whatever means may be necessary, including the use of arms, the Marxist-Leninist regime in Cuba from extending, by force or the threat of force, its aggressive or subversive activities to any part of this hemisphere;

(b) to prevent in Cuba the creation or use of an externally supported military capability endangering the security of the United States; and

(c) to work with the Organization of American States and with freedom-loving Cubans to support the aspirations of the Cuban people for self-determination.

people foving Cuborganizati

1 See also the Supplemental Appropriations Act, 1982 (Public Law 97-257; 96 Stat 818 at 833), and sec. 1543 of the Department of Defense Authorization Act, 1985 (Public Law 98-525; 98 Stat. 2639), which reaffirmed Public Law 87-733.

3. Middle East Resolutions and Related Material 1 a. Resolution to Promote Peace and Stability in the Middle

East

Public Law 86-7 (H.J. Res. 117), 71 Stat. 5, approved March 9, 1967; as

amended by Public Law 87-195 [Foreign Assistance Act of 1961, S. 1983), 76 Stat. 424, approved September 4, 1961

JOINT RESOLUTION To promote peace and stability in the Middle East. Resolved by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled, That the President be and hereby is authorized to cooperate with and assist any nation or group of nations in the general area of the Middle East desiring such assistance in the development of economic strength dedicated to the maintenance of national independence.

SEC. 2.2 The President is authorized to undertake, in the general area of the Middle East, military assistance programs with any nation or group of nations of that area desiring such assistance. Furthermore, the United States regards as vital to the national interest and world peace the preservation of the independence and integrity of the nations of the Middle East. To this end, if the President determines the necessity thereof, the United States is prepared to use armed forces to assist any nation or group of such nations requesting assistance against armed aggression from any country controlled by international communism: Provided, That such employment shall be consonant with the treaty obligations of the United States and with the Constitution of the United States.

SEC. 3.3 The President is hereby authorized to use during the balance of fiscal year 1957 for economic and military assistance under this joint resolution not to exceed $200,000,000 from any appropriation now available for carrying out the provisions of the Mutual Security Act of 1954, as amended, in accord with the provisions of such Act: Provided, That, whenever the President determines it to be important to the security of the United States, such use may be under the authority of section 401(a) of the Mutual Security Act of 1954, as amended (except that the provisions of section 105(a) thereof shall not be waived), and without regard to the provisions of section 105 of the Mutual Security Appropriation Act, 1957: Provided, further, That obligations incurred in carrying out the purposes of the first sentence of section 2 of this joint resolution shall be paid only out of appropriations for military assistance, and obligations incurred in carrying out the purposes of the first section of this joint resolution shall be paid only out of appropriations other than those for military assistance. This authorization is in addition to other existing authorizations with respect to the use of such appropriations. None of the additional authorizations contained in this section shall be used until fifteen days after the Committee on Foreign Relations of the Senate, the Committee on Foreign Affairs of the House of Representatives, the Committees on Appropriations of the Senate and the House of Representatives and, when military assistance is involved, the Committees on Armed Services of the Senate and the House of Representatives have been furnished a report showing the object of the proposed use, the country for the benefit of which such use is intended, and the particular appropriation or appropriations for carrying out the provisions of the Mutual Security Act of 1954, as amended, from which the funds are proposed to be derived: Provided, That funds available under this section during the balance of fiscal year 1957 shall, in the case of any such report submitted during the last fifteen days of the fiscal year, remain available for use under this section for the purposes stated in such report for a period of twenty days following the date of submission of such report. Nothing contained in this joint resolution shall be construed as itself authorizing the appropriation of additional funds for the purpose of carry. ing out the provisions of the first section or of the first sentence of section 2 of this joint resolution.

1 See also legislation under War Powers.

222 U.S.C. 1961. Sec. 103(c) of the FRIENDSHIP Act (Public Law 103–199; 107 Stat. 2320), relating to statutory provisions applicable to the Soviet Union, provided the following:

"(c) FINDINGS AND AFFIRMATION.--The Congress finds and affirms that provisions such as those described in this section, including—* **

"(8) section 2 of the joint resolution entitled "A joint resolution to promote peace and sta

bility in the Middle East", approved March 9, 1957 (Public Law 85–7), and *** "should not be construed as being directed against Russia, Ukraine, or the other independent states of the former Soviet Union, connoting an adversarial relationship between the United States and the independent states, or signifying or implying in any manner unfriendliness to ward the independent states.".

For complete list of related statutes, see sec. 103 of the FRIENDSHIP Act, in Legislation on Foreign Relations Through 1994, vol. I-B. 32Ž U.S.C. 1962.

SEC. 4.4 The President should continue to furnish facilities and military assistance, within the provisions of applicable law and established policies, to the United Nations Emergency Force in the Middle East, with a view to maintaining the truce in that region.

SEC. 5.5 The President shall whenever appropriate 6 report to the Congress his action hereunder.

Sec. 6.? This joint resolution shall expire when the President shall determine that the peace and security of the nations in the general area of the Middle East are reasonably assured by international conditions created by action of the United Nations or otherwise except that it may be terminated earlier by a concurrent resolution of the two Houses of Congress.

* 22 U.S.C. 1963. 622 U.S.C. 1964.

• Sec. 705 of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1961 (Public Law 87-195) inserted "whenever ap propriate" in lieu of "within the months of January and July of each year".

722 U.S.C. 1965.

b. Multinational Force and Observers Participation

Resolution Public Law 97-132 (S.J. Res. 100), 95 Stat. 1693, approved December 29, 1981 A JOINT RESOLUTION To authorize the participation of the United States in a multinational force and observers to implement the Treaty of Peace between

Egypt and Israel. Whereas the Treaty of Peace between Egypt and Israel signed on

March 26, 1979, calls for the supervision of security arrangements to be undertaken by United Nations forces and observers;

and Whereas the United Nations has been unable to assume those re

sponsibilities at this time; and Whereas a Protocol signed on August 3, 1981, by the Government

of the Arab Republic of Egypt and the Government of the State of Israel provides for the creation of an alternative Multinational

Force and Observers to implement the Treaty of Peace; and Whereas the Government of the Arab Republic of Egypt and the

Government of the State of Israel have requested that the United States participate in the Multinational Force and Observers: Now, therefore, be it

Resolved by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled,

SHORT TITLE SECTION 1. This joint resolution may be cited as the “Multinational Force and Observers Participation Resolution”.

STATEMENT OF POLICY SEC. 2.1 The Congress considers the establishment of the Multinational Force and Observers to be an essential stage in the development of a comprehensive settlement in the Middle East. The Congress enacts this resolution with the hope and expectation that establishment of the Multinational Force and Observers will assist Egypt and Israel in fulfilling the Camp David accords and bring about the establishment of a self-governing authority in order to provide full autonomy in the West Bank and Gaza.

PARTICIPATION OF UNITED STATES PERSONNEL IN THE

MULTINATIONAL FORCE AND OBSERVERS SEC. 3.2 (a)(1) Subject to the limitations contained in this resolution, the President is authorized to assign, under such terms and conditions as he may determine, members of the United States

122 U.S.C. 3421. 222 U.S.C. 3422.

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