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the next 2 fiscal years, including assessed and voluntary

contributions. (2) OTHER MATTERS REGARDING PEACEKEEPING OPERATIONS.—

(A) An assessment of the effectiveness of ongoing international peacekeeping operations, their relevance to United States national interests, the efforts by the United Nations and other international organizations (as applicable) to resolve the relevant armed conflicts, and the projected termination dates for all such operations.

(B) The dollar value and percentage of total peacekeeping contracts that have been awarded to United States

contractors during the previous year. (3) UNITED NATIONS REFORM.

(A)(i) A description of the status of efforts to establish and implement an independent office of the Inspector General at the United Nations.

(ii) If an office of the Inspector General has been established at the United Nations, a discussion of whether the Inspector General is keeping the Secretary General and the members of the General Assembly fully informed about problems, deficiencies, the necessity for corrective action, and the progress of corrective action.

(iii) For purposes of this subparagraph, the term 'office of the Inspector General means an independent office (or other independent entity) established by the United Nations to conduct and supervise objective audits, inspections, and investigations relating to the programs and operations of the United Nations.

(B) A description of the status of efforts to reduce the United States peacekeeping assessment rate.

(C) A description of the status of other United States efforts to achieve financial and management reform at the

United Nations. (4) MILITARY PERSONNEL PARTICIPATING IN MULTINATIONAL FORCES.-A description of

(A) the status under international law of members of multinational forces, including the legal status of such personnel if captured, missing, or detained;

(B) the extent of the risk for United States military personnel who are captured while participating in multinational forces in cases where their captors fail to respect the 1949 Geneva Conventions and other international agreements intended to protect prisoners of war; and

(C) the specific steps that have been taken to protect United States military personnel participating in multinational forces, together (if necessary) with any recommendations for the enactment of legislation to achieve

that objective. (5) HUMAN RIGHTS AND U.N. PEACEKEEPING FORCES.-A description of the efforts by United Nations peacekeeping forces to promote and protect internationally recognized human rights standards, including the status of investigations in any case of alleged human rights violations during the preceding

year by personnel participating in United Nations peacekeep

ing forces, as well as any action taken in such cases. (e) 10 DESIGNATED CONGRESSIONAL COMMITTEES.—As used in this section, the term "designated congressional committees" has the meaning given that term by section 415 of the Foreign Relations Authorization Act, Fiscal Years 1994 and 1995.11

SEC. 5.12 (a) Notwithstanding the provisions of any other law, whenever the United States is called upon by the Security Council to apply measures which said Council has decided, pursuant to article 41 of said Chapter, are to be employed to give effect to its decisions under said Charter, the President may, to the extent necessary to apply such measures, through any agency which he may designate, and under such orders, rules, and regulations as may be prescribed by him, investigate, regulate, or prohibit, in whole or in part, economic relations of rail, sea, air, postal, telegraphic, radio, and other means of communication between any foreign country or any national thereof or any person therein and the United States or any person subject to the jurisdiction thereof, or involving any property subject to the jurisdiction of the United States. Any Executive order which is issued under this subsection and which applies measures against Southern Rhodesia pursuant to any United Nations Security Council Resolution may be enforced, notwithstanding the provisions of any other law. 13 The President may exempt from such Executive order any shipment of chromium in any form which is in transit to the United States on the date of enactment of this sentence.14

(b) Any person who willfully violates or evades or attempts to violate or evade any order, rule, or regulation issued by the President pursuant to paragraph (a) of this section shall, upon conviction, be fined not more than $10,000 or, if a natural person, be imprisoned for not more than ten years, or both; and the officer, director, or agent of any corporation who knowingly participates in such violation or evasion shall be punished by a like fine, imprisonment, or both, and any property, funds, securities, papers, or other articles or documents, or any vessel, together with her tackle, apparel, furniture, and equipment, or vehicle, or aircraft, 15 concerned in such violation shall be forfeited to the United States.

11 Sec. 415 of the Foreign Relations Authorization Act, Fiscal Years 1994 and 1995; Public Law 103-236; 108 Stat. 456), provides the following:

"SEC. 415. DESIGNATED CONGRESSIONAL COMMITTEES.

"For purposes of this part, the term 'designated congressional committees' means the Committee on Appropriations and the Committee on Foreign Relations of the Senate and the Committee on Appropriations and the Committee on Foreign Affairs of the House of Representatives.".

12 22 U.S.C. 287c.

13 Such an Executive Order was issued on March 18, 1977, Executive Order 11978 (amending Executive Order 11419). Sec. 27 of the International Security Assistance Act of 1978 (92 Stal 746), repealed in 1981, specified that the United States would not enforce sanctions against Rho desia alter December 31, 1978, provided that the President made certain determinations regarding the political situation in Rhodesia (Legislation on Foreign Relations Through 1992, vol. I, page 531, footnote 11). The policy contained in sec. 27 was never implemented since the President did not issue the necessary determinations. See also sec. 408 of the Department of State Authorization Act, Fiscal Year 1980-81 (Public Law 96-60; 93 Stat. 405) (this volume) which contained several congressional findings regarding the Zimbabwe Rhodesia situation and instructed the President to terminate sanctions against Zimbabwe Rhodesia by November 15, 1979, unless he determined that it would not be in the national interest of the United States to do so. On November 14, President Carter issued Determination No. 80 44 (55 F.R. 67073) making a finding that it was not in the interest of the United States to terminate the sanctions. However, on December 16, 1979, the President issued Executive Order 12183 (44 F.R. 74787) which revoked all sanctions against Zimbabwe-Rhodesia. Such Executive Order also revoked Executive Orders 11322, 11419, and 11978.

14 The final two sentences of subsec. (a) were added by Public Law 95-12 (91 Stat. 22).

(c) 16 (1) During the period in which measures are applied against Southern Rhodesia under subsection (a) pursuant to any United Nations Security Council Resolution, a shipment of any steel mill product (as such product may be defined by the Secretary) containing chromium in any form may not be released from customs custody for entry into the United States if

(A) a certificate of origin with respect to such shipment has not been filed with the Secretary; or

(B) in the case of a shipment with respect to which a certificate of origin has been filed with the Secretary, the Secretary determines that the information contained in such certificate does not adequately establish that the steel mill product in such shipment does not contain chromium in any form which

is of Southern Rhodesian origin; unless such release is authorized by the Secretary under paragraph (3) (B) or (C).

(2) The Secretary shall prescribe regulations for carrying out this subsection.

(3)(A) In carrying out this subsection, the Secretary may issue subpenas requiring the attendance and testimony of witnesses and the production of evidence. Any such subpena, may, upon application by the Secretary, be enforced in a civil action in an appropriate United States district court.

(B) The Secretary may exempt from the certification requirements of this subsection any shipment of a steel mill product containing chromium in any form which is in transit to the United States on the date of enactment of this subsection.

(C) Under such circumstances as he deems appropriate, the Secretary may release from customs custody for entry into the United States, under such bond as he may require, any shipment of a steel mill product containing chromium in any form. (4) As used in this subsection

(A) the term “certificate of origin” means such certificate as the Secretary may require, with respect to a shipment of any steel mill product containing chromium in any form, issued by the government (or by a designee of such government if the Secretary is satisfied that such designee is the highest available certifying authority) of the country in which such steel mill product was produced certifying that the steel mill product in such shipment contains no chromium in any form which is of Southern Rhodesian origin; and

(B) the term “Secretary” means the Secretary of the Treasury. SEC. 6.17 The President is authorized to negotiate a special agreement or agreements with the Security Council which shall be subject to the approval of the Congress by appropriate Act or joint resolution, providing for the numbers and types of armed forces, their degree of readiness and general locations, and the nature of facilities and assistance, including rights of passage, to be made

18 The words “or aircran" added by sec. 3 of Public Law 81-341 (63 Stat. 735). 18 Subsec. (c) was added by Public Law 95-12 (91 Stat. 22). 17 22 U.S.C. 287d.

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and the replacement of such items, when necessary, where

they are furnished from stocks. (b) Whenever personnel or assistance is made available pursuant to the authority contained in subsection (a) (1) and (2) of this section, the President shall require reimbursement from the United Nations for the expense thereby incurred by the United States: Provided, That in exceptional circumstances, or when the President finds it to be in the national interest, he may waive, in whole or in part, the requirement of such reimbursement: Provided further, That when any such reimbursement is made, it shall be credited, at the option of the appropriate department of the Department of Defense, either to the appropriation, fund, or account utilized in incurring the obligation, or to an appropriate appropriation, fund, or account currently available for the purposes for which expenditures were made.

(c) In addition to the authorization of appropriations to the Department of State contained in section 8 of this Act, there is hereby authorized to be appropriated to the Department of Defense, or any department therein, such sums as may be necessary to reimburse such departments in the event that reimbursement from the United Nations is waived in whole or in part pursuant to authority contained in subsection (b) of this section.

(d) Nothing in this Act shall authorize the disclosure of any information or knowledge in any case in which such disclosure is prohibited by any other law of the United States.

SEC. 8.20 There is hereby authorized to be appropriated annually to the Department of State, out of any money in the treasury not otherwise appropriated, such sums as may be necessary for the payment by the United States of its share of the expenses of the United Nations as apportioned by the General Assembly in accordance with article 17 of the Charter, and for all necessary salaries and expenses of the representatives provided for in section 2 hereof, and of their appropriate staffs, including personal services in the District of Columbia and elsewhere, without regard to the civilservice laws and the Classification Act of 1923, as amended; 21 travel expenses without regard to the Standardized Government Travel Regulations, as amended, the Travel Expense Act of 1949,22 and section 10 of the Act of March 3, 1933, as amended,23 and, under such rules and regulations as the Secretary of State may prescribe, travel expenses of families and transportation of effects of United States representatives and other personnel in going to

2022 U.S.C. 287e. Added originally as sec. 7, this text was redesignated as sec. 8 by sec. 6 of Public Law 81-341 (63 Stat. 936).

Sec. 410 of the Foreign Assistance Act of 1971 (Public Law 92-226), approved February 7, 1972, provided as follows:

"The Congress strongly urges the President to undertake such negotiations as may be necessary to implement that portion of the recommendations of the Report of the President's Com mission for the Observance of the Twenty-fifth Anniversary of the United Nations (known as the 'Lodge Commission”) which proposes that the portion of the regular assessed costs to be paid by the United States to the United Nations be reduced so that the United States is assessed in each year not more than 25 per centum of such costs assessed all members of the United Nations for that year.".

See also title IV, part A of the Foreign Relations Authorization Act for Fiscal Years 1994 and 1995 (Public Law 103-236; 108 Stat. 445).

21 Classification Act of 1923, as amended, is now the Classification Act of 1949, as amended (5 U.S.C. 305, 5101-5113, 5115, 5331-5338, 5341, 5342, 5509, 7154).

2 Travel Expense Act of 1949 is now amended (5 U.S.C. 5701, 5702, 5704–5708). 23 15 U.S.C. 5731.

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