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SEC. 105.01 OTHER PROGRAMS.

The following amounts are authorized to be appropriated for the Department of State to carry out the authorities, functions, duties, and responsibilities in the conduct of the foreign affairs of the United States and for other purposes authorized by law:

(1) 22 UNITED STATES BILATERAL SCIENCE AND TECHNOLOGY AGREEMENTS.-For “United States Bilateral Science and Technology Agreements", $4,000,000 for the fiscal year 1990 and $4,160,000 for the fiscal year 1991.

(2) 23 SOVIET-EAST EUROPEAN RESEARCH AND TRAINING.–For "Soviet-East European Research and Training", $4,600,000 for

the fiscal year 1990 and $5,200,000 for the fiscal year 1991.
SEC. 106.24
SEC. 107.28 .
SEC. 108....

PART B-DEPARTMENT OF STATE AUTHORITIES AND

ACTIVITIES; FOREIGN MISSIONS

SEC. 116. ENHANCEMENT OF EVACUATION CAPABILITY AND PROCE.

DURES REGARDING MAJOR DISASTERS AND INCIDENTS
ABROAD AFFECTING UNITED STATES CITIZENS.

*

* (d) 27 DEVELOPMENT OF STANDARDIZED PROCEDURES.

(1) The Secretary of State shall enter into discussions with international air carriers and other appropriate entities to develop standardized procedures which will assist the Secretary in implementing the provisions of section 43 of the State Department Basic Authorities Act of 1956, as amended by subsection (c).

(2) The Secretary of State shall consider the feasibility of establishing a toll-free telephone number to facilitate inquiries

91 The Department of State Appropriations Act, 1990 (title III of Public Law 101-162; 103 Stat. 1009), provided for the programs listed here, and for "Payment to the Asia Foundation": $13,900,0XX; and for the "Fishermen's Guaranty Fund": $900,000.

The Department of State Appropriations Act, 1991 (title Ill of Public Law 101-515; 104 Stat. 2127), provided for the programs listed here, and for "Payment to the Asia Foundation": $13,978,000; for the "Fishermen's Guaranty Fund": $900,000; and for the "Fishermen's Protective Fund": $600,000.

*The Department of State Appropriations Act, 1990 (title III of Public Law 101-162; 103 Stat. 1009) provided $4,000,000 for "United States Bilateral Science and Technology Agree ments".

The Department of State Appropriations Act, 1991 (title III of Public Law 101-515; 104 Stat. 2127), provided $4,500,000.

w the Department of State Appropriations Act, 1990 (title III of Public Law 101-162; 103 Stat 1009), provided $4,600,000 for "Soviet-East European Research and Training".

The Department of State Appropriations Act, 1991 (litle III of Public Law 101-515; 104 Stat. 2127), provided $4,600,000.

** See 106 added a new sec. 11 to the State Department Basic Authorities Act of 1956 (22 U.S.C. 2678) relating to a reduction in earmarks if appropriations are less than authorizations.

* Sec. 107 amended sec. 24 of the State Department Basic Authorities Act of 1956.

* Sex. 108 amended see. 1302(b) of the International Securty and Development Cooperation Act of 1985 (22 U.S.C. 2151), to prohibit use of funds "for the conduct of current dialogue on the Middle East pace process with any representative of the Palestine Liberation Organization, if the vident knows and advises the Congress that that n in the planning or execution of a particular tertunist activity which resulted in the death or kid. napping of a United States citizen.. For text, sæ Legislation on Foreign Relations Through

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by the next-of-kin in cases of major disasters or incidents abroad which affect the health and safety of citizens of the United States residing or traveling abroad. (e) REPORT TO CONGRESS.-Not later than 180 days after the date of the enactment of this Act, the Secretary of State shall prepare and submit a report to the Congress which sets forth plans for the implementation of the amendment made by subsection (c) and the provisions of subsection (d)(1), together with the Secretary's comments concerning the proposal under subsection (d)(2).

SEC. 124. OPENING A UNITED STATES CONSULATE IN BRATISLAVA. (a) FINDINGS.—The Congress finds that

(1) the State Department's “special consulate” concept offers a model for reopening a consulate in Bratislava, Czechoslovakia, at modest cost and with significant public diplomacy and political benefits;

(2) the United States still owns the old consulate building and in 1987–1988 spent about $500,000 to renovate parts of the building;

(3) the building has been productively used for trade and cultural events, but could be more effectively used by restoring it to its original purpose as the locus of official United States representation in the Slovak capital;

(4) Slovakia has been the source of the largest and most recent wave of Czechoslovak emigration to the United States and approximately three and one-half million Americans are of Slovak heritage;

(5) American tourists in Slovakia, many visiting relatives, often require consular assistance and this consular support could best be provided by a consulate in Bratislava;

(6) Slovaks account for more than half of all Czechoslovak tourist travel to the United States and this travel, which should be encouraged, could be expedited by a United States consulate in Bratislava;

(7) the Slovak underground Catholic Church is one of the most vibrant religious forces in Czechoslovakia and each year tens of thousands of Catholics make pilgrimages to Slovakia;

(8) American outreach efforts in Slovakia have been hindered by the absence of a constant and direct American presence in

by the ava; an Hungaiate in hand to help

(9) with its Hungarian, Polish, and Ukrainian minorities, a United States consulate in Bratislava would provide important

information on both regional and local developments. (b) SENSE OF THE CONGRESS.—It is the sense of the Congress that the President should take all practicable steps to reopen the United States consulate in Bratislava, Czechoslovakia. SEC. 125.2 CONSTRUCTION OF UNITED STATES EMBASSY IN OTTAWA.

Section 402(a) of the Diplomatic Security Act (22 U.S.C. 4852(a)) shall not apply to the construction or renovation of the United States Embassy in Ottawa, Canada.

28 22 U.S.C. 4852 note.

Act. Vot TMENT

f

SEC. 126. VOLUNTARY PILOT PROGRAM FOR INCREASED PARTICIPA.

TION BY ECONOMICALLY AND SOCIALLY DISADVAN.
TAGED ENTERPRISES IN FOREIGN RELATIONS ACTIVI.

TIES. (a) ESTABLISHMENT OF PILOT PROGRAM FOR VOLUNTARY SETASIDES.-Not later than 90 days after the date of the enactment of this Act, the Secretary of State (in consultation with the Director of the United States Information Agency) shall prepare and transmit a detailed plan for the establishment for the fiscal years 1990 and 1991 of a pilot program of voluntary set-asides for increased participation, to the extent practicable, by economically and socially disadvantaged enterprises in programs and activities of the Department of State and the United States Information Agency to the Committee on Foreign Affairs of the House of Representatives and the Committee on Foreign Relations of the Senate. (b) CONTENTS OF PLAN.Such plan shall include

(1) a description of where such pilot program will be located in each such agency's organizational structure and what relevant lines of authority will be established;

(2) a listing of the specific responsibilities that will be assigned to the pilot program to enable it to increase, to the extent practicable and in a rational and effective manner, partici. pation of economically and socially disadvantaged enterprises in activities funded by such agencies;

(3) a detailed design for a time-phase system for bringing about expanded participation, to the extent practicable, by economically and socially disadvantaged enterprises, including

(A) specific recommendations for percentage allocations of contracts, subcontracts, procurement, grants, and research and development activities by such agencies to such enterprises; and

(B) particular consideration of the participation of economically and socially disadvantaged enterprises in activities in the areas of communications, telecommunications,

and information systems; (4) a proposed reporting system that will permit objective measuring of the degree of participation of economically and socially disadvantaged enterprises in comparison to the total activities funded by such agencies;

(5) a detailed projection of the administrative budgetary impact of the establishment of the pilot program; and

(6) a detailed set of objective criteria upon which determinations will be made as to the qualifications of economically and socially disadvantaged enterprises to receive contracts funded by such agencies. (c) OBJECTIVES.—The objective of the pilot program shall be to increase the participation, to the extent practicable, of economically and socially disadvantaged business enterprises in contract, procurement, grant, and research and development activities funded by the agencies. (d) RESPONSIBILITIES.—The pilot program shall

(1) establish, maintain, and disseminate information to, and otherwise serve as an information clearinghouse for, economically and socially disadvantaged business enterprises regarding business opportunities funded by the agencies;

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(2) design and conduct projects to encourage, promote, and assist economically and socially disadvantaged business enterprises to secure direct contracts, host country contracts, subcontracts, grants, and research and development contracts in order for such enterprises to participate in programs funded by the Department of State and the United States Information Agency;

(3) conduct market research, planning, economic and business analyses, and feasibility studies to identify business opportunities funded by such agencies;

(4) develop support mechanisms which will enable socially and economically disadvantaged enterprises to take advantage of business opportunities in programs funded by such agencies; and

(5) enter into such contracts (to such extent or in such amounts as are provided in advance in appropriation Acts), cooperative agreements, or other transactions as may be nec

essary in the conduct of its functions under this section. (e) RESPONSIBILITIES OF THE SECRETARY.—The Secretary of State (after consultation with the Director of the United States Information Agency) shall provide the pilot program with such relevant information, including procurement schedules, bids, and specifications with respect to programs funded by the Department of State and the United States Information Agency, as may be requested by the pilot program in connection with the performance of its functions under this section. (f) DEFINITIONS.—

(1) For the purposes of this section, the term "economically and socially disadvantaged enterprise” means a business

(A) which is at least 51 percent owned by one or more socially and economically disadvantaged individuals or, in the case of a publicly-owned business, at least 51 percent of the stock of which is owned by one or more socially and economically disadvantaged individuals; and

(B) whose management and daily business operations are controlled by one or more such individuals. (2) Socially disadvantaged individuals are those who have been subjected to racial or ethnic prejudice or cultural bias because of their identity as a member of a group without regard to their individual qualities.

(3) Economically disadvantaged individuals are those socially disadvantaged individuals whose ability to compete in the free enterprise system has been impaired due to diminished capital and credit opportunities as compared to others in the same business area who are not socially disadvantaged. In determining the degree of diminished credit and capital opportunities, the Administrator of the agency shall consider, but not be limited to, the assets and net worth of the socially disadvantaged

individual. (g) REPORTS TO CONGRESS.-For each of the fiscal years 1990 and 1991, the Secretary of State shall prepare and submit a report concerning the implementation of the pilot program under this section to the Committee on Foreign Affairs of the House of Representatives and the Committee on Foreign Relations of the Senate.

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SEC. 127. REPORT ON REORGANIZATION OF THE DEPARTMENT OF

STATE. (a) FINDINGS.—The Congress makes the following findings:

(1) The Department of State is currently reviewing its organizational structure.

(2) Each of the geographical bureaus deals with a large number of countries and often a broad diversity of cultures, nationalities, and ethnic divisions.

(3) The territory covered by the Bureau of Near Eastern and South Asian Affairs, for example, stretches from the Atlantic coast of Morocco to the Bay of Bengal, includes twenty-five countries, more than a billion people, a number of regional disputes, and several cultural and linguistic divisions. The Bureau of Inter-American Affairs has within its jurisdiction thirty-three countries, including Mexico, the nations of the Caribbean Basin, and Central and South America.

(4) Among the most pressing international issues is the prospect for global warming. Over the next few years, American leadership at the international level will be crucial to worldwide efforts to ensure that global warming does not occur. The Department of State will need to consider appropriate steps to prepare for the leadership role of the United States.

(5) The United States continues to face a foreign intelligence threat, including the danger to United States diplomatic missions. The Department of State will need to improve its ability to detect and prevent intelligence penetration of United States

missions abroad. (b) REPORT.-Not later than 120 days after the date of enactment of this Act 29 the Secretary of State shall submit to the Committee on Foreign Relations of the Senate and the Committee on Foreign Affairs of the House of Representatives a report assessing the advisability of reorganization of its regional and functional bureaus. The report shall include, but not be limited to, an assessment of the advisability of two bureaus to cover the present responsibilities of the Bureau of Inter-American Affairs, an Office of Diplomatic Security to be headed by an Under Secretary-level Director of Diplomatic Security, and an Office of Global Warming within the Bureau of Oceans, International Environmental and Scientific Affairs. The report shall also include an assessment of the advisability of transferring the jurisdictional responsibility for the Organization of American States from the Bureau of International Organizations to the Bureau of Inter-American Affairs, and of creating a high-level coordinator for United States policy toward Mexico. In the context of the report required by this subsection, it is the sense of the Congress that the Secretary of State should give serious consideration to the establishment of a Bureau of South Asian Affairs within the Department of State.

An Foreign Relatiorecretary of State days after the date visability of e House of Red Senate and

20 Sec. 320/bX1) of Public Law 101-302 (104 Stat. 247) struck out “February 3, 1990” and inserted in lieu thereof “120 days after the date of enactment of this Act".

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