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31, 1984, of the United Nations Educational, Scientific, and Cultural Organization.

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SEC. 410. CONTRIBUTION TO THE REGULAR BUDGET OF THE INTER

NATIONAL COMMITTEE OF THE RED CROSS. Notwithstanding section 742 of the Foreign Relations Authorization Act, Fiscal Years 1988 and 1989 (Public Law 100–204),68 for each of the fiscal years 1990 and 1991, the Secretary of State shall not be required to make an annual contribution to the regular budget of the International Committee of the Red Cross of an amount which is greater than 10 percent of the 1989 regular budget of the International Committee of the Red Cross. SEC. 411. SENSE OF CONGRESS CONCERNING AN ENHANCED ROLE

FOR THE INTERNATIONAL COURT OF JUSTICE IN RESO

LUTION OF INTERNATIONAL DISPUTES. (a) FINDINGS.—The Congress makes the following findings:

(1) In 1945, the United States supported the establishment of the International Court of Justice (ICJ) to provide for the orderly resolution of disputes among nations under the rule of law.

(2) The United States, pursuant to Article 93 of the Charter of the United Nations, is also a party to the Statute of the International Court of Justice which provides in Article 36(1) that the International Court of Justice will have jurisdiction over "all cases which the parties refer to it and all matters specially provided for in the Charter of the United Nations or in treaties and conventions in force”.

(3) In August 1946, the United States, pursuant to Senate advice and consent (61 Stat. 1218), voluntarily accepted the compulsory jurisdiction of the International Court of Justice in other international disputes under Article 36(2) of the Statute of the International Court of Justice, on certain conditions, and maintained such recognition for four decades from 1946 to 1986 when United States acceptance was terminated

(4) The United States has utilized the International Court of Justice on numerous occasions to resolve disputes with other nations.

(5) In April 1984, the United States notified the Secretary General of the United Nations that the United States was suspending for two years its acceptance of the compulsory jurisdiction of the International Court of Justice in cases relating to Central America.

(6) In 1985, the United States announced it was terminating, in whole, United States acceptance (effective April 1, 1986) of the compulsory jurisdiction of the International Court of Justice.

(7) The Soviet Union, as a member of the United Nations, is also a party to the Statute of the International Court of Justice and is thus bound by Article 36(1).

Sec. 742 of the Foreign Relations Authorization Act, Fiscal Years 1988 and 190y, provideo that "the Secretary of State shall make an annual contribution to the regular budget of the International Committee of the Red Cross of an amount which is not less than 10 percent of its regular budget."

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(8) The Soviet Union, unlike the United States, has not since the inception of the International Court of Justice voluntarily accepted the compulsory jurisdiction of the ICJ under Article 36(2) or taken any other case voluntarily to the court.

(9) Soviet leader Mikhail Gorbachev, in his address to the United Nations in December of 1988 said: “We believe that the jurisdiction of the International Court of Justice at the Hague as regards the interpretation and implementation of agreements on human rights should be binding on all states.”.

(10) The Legal Adviser of the State Department is holding discussions with Soviet officials and representatives of other permanent members of the United Nations Security Council and other states to determine whether and how the International Court of Justice might be used for the peaceful settlement of international disputes through procedures that assure

fairness and the protection of legitimate national interests. (b) SENSE OF CONGRESS.—The Congress commends and strongly supports efforts by the United States to broaden, where appropriate, the compulsory jurisdiction and enhance the effectiveness of the International Court of Justice. SEC. 412.67 INTERNATIONAL BOUNDARY AND WATER COMMISSION.

Nothe Secretaroreign Am Relati

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SEC. 413. REVIEW OF MULTILATERAL AND BILATERAL COMMISSIONS.

Not later than 180 days after the date of the enactment of this Act, the Secretary of State shall prepare and submit a report to the Committee on Foreign Affairs of the House of Representatives and the Committee on Foreign Relations of the Senate which provides a review of United States participation in all multilateral and bilateral commissions for which appropriations are authorized to be made under the “International Commissions” account of the Department of State. Together with such comments and recommendations as the Secretary considers appropriate, such report shall include

(1) a justification for United States participation in each multilateral or bilateral commission;

(2) an assessment of the effectiveness of each multilateral or bilateral commission in which the United States participates; and

(3) information concerning the cost of United States partici

pation in each such commission. SEC. 414.68 MEMBERSHIP OF THE PALESTINE LIBERATION ORGANIZA

TION IN UNITED NATIONS AGENCIES. (a) PROHIBITION.—No funds authorized to be appropriated by this Act or any other Act shall be available for the United Nations or any specialized agency thereof which accords the Palestine Liberation Organization the same standing as member states.

(b) TRANSFER OR REPROGRAMMING.–Funds subject to the prohibition contained in subsection (a) which would be available for the United Nations or any specialized agency thereof (but for that prohibition) are authorized to remain available until expended and

on Sec. 412 amended various Public Laws relating to the International Boundary and Water Commission, United States and Mexico.

22 U.S.C. 287e note.

nizationé Secretariate to prerations; aributions by

may be reprogrammed or transferred to any other account of the Department of State or the Agency for International Development to carry out the general purposes for which such funds were authorized. SEC. 416. SENSE OF CONGRESS CONCERNING THE UNITED NATIONS

RELIEF AND WORKS AGENCY FOR PALESTINIAN REFU.

GEES IN THE NEAR EAST (UNRWA). (a) SENSE OF CONGRESS.—It is the sense of the Congress that

(1) international burdensharing of the costs of the United Nations Relief and Works Agency for Palestinian Refugees in the Near East (UNRWA) is crucial to the survival of such organization;

(2) the Secretary of State should redouble the efforts of the Department of State to promote international burdensharing of the costs of UNRWA's operations; and

(3) regular and substantial contributions by the Arab states to the budget of the United Nations Relief and Works Agency for Palestinian Refugees in the Near East would reflect the commitment of Arab states to a peaceful political settlement in

the Middle East. (b) REPORT TO CONGRESS.—The Secretary of State shall prepare and submit a report on progress being made to promote international burdensharing of the costs of the United Nations Relief and Works Agency for Palestinian Refugees in the Near East (UNRWA) to the Committee on Foreign Affairs of the House of Representatives and the Committee on Foreign Relations of the Senate. SEC. 416. UNITED NATIONS SPONSORSHIP OF A MIDDLE EAST PEACE

CONFERENCE. (a) FINDINGS.—The Congress finds that,

(1) the General Assembly of the United Nations adopted Resolution No. 3379 on November 10, 1975, maintaining that Zionism constituted a form of racism;

(2) most of the proposals for an international peace conference regarding the Middle East have identified the United Nations as the sponsoring organization for such a conference;

(3) all international diplomatic participants in any potential Middle East peace conference must acknowledge the sovereignty of the State of Israel and the right of its citizens to live within secure and permanent boundaries;

(4) United Nations General Assembly Resolution No. 3379 of November 10, 1975, damages the credibility of the General Assembly as a forum for furthering the search for peace in the Middle East; and

(5) the United States does not favor an international conference on the Middle East at this time, and believes that the Israeli proposal for elections that was advanced in May 1989 is the best available vehicle for furthering the Middle East

peace process. (b) POLICY.—The Congress declares, therefore, that,

(1) the United States should use all appropriate means to ob tain rescission by the United Nations General Assembly of Resolution No. 3379 and calls upon the General Assembly to do so; and

(2) so long as that resolution remains in effect, the General Assembly and all affiliated agencies of the United Nations constitute an inappropriate forum for the sponsorship of any inter

national conference on the Arab-Israeli conflict. SEC. 417. CONTRIBUTIONS FOR PEACEKEEPING ACTIVITIES IN

SOUTHERN AFRICA. (a) ASSURANCES THAT ALL CUBAN TROOPS WILL BE WITHDRAWN.—The United States may not, after the date of enactment of this Act, expend any funds authorized to be appropriated by this Act for a contribution or any other assistance with respect to implementation of the Tripartite Agreement until the President certifies to the Congress that,

(1) the United States has received explicit and reliable assurances from each of the parties to the Bilateral Agreement that all Cuban troops will be withdrawn from Angola by July 1, 1991, and that no Cuban troops will remain in Angola after that date; and

(2) the Secretary General of the United Nations has assured the United States that it is his understanding that all Cuban troops will be withdrawn from Angola by July 1, 1991, and

that no Cuban troops will remain in Angola after that date. (b) CONTRIBUTIONS CONDITIONAL ON COMPLIANCE.—The United States may not expend any funds authorized to be appropriated by this Act for a contribution or any other assistance with respect to implementation of the Tripartite Agreement

(1) if the Government of Cuba fails at any time to comply with any of its obligations under Article 1 of the Bilateral Agreement (relating to the calendar for redeployment and withdrawal of Cuban troops); or

(2) if any Cuban troops remain in Angola after July 1, 1991. (c) REPORTS TO CONGRESS, COMPLIANCE WITH OBLIGATIONS.—Not more than 15 days after each scheduled phase of the redeployment northward and withdrawal of Cuban troops pursuant to the Bilateral Agreement, the President shall submit to the appropriate congressional committees a report on whether each of the signatories of the Tripartite Agreement is complying with its obligations under the agreement. Whenever he has determined that a material breach of the Tripartite Agreement may have been committed by any of the signatories to that agreement, the President shall so report to the appropriate congressional committees.70

(d) DISBURSEMENTS. Of the amount authorized to be appropriated to be made available for contribution with respect to implementation of the Agreement Among the People's Republic of Angola, the Republic of Cuba, and the Republic of South Africa signed at the United Nations on December 22, 1988 (hereinafter known as the Tripartite Agreement) 50 percent of the annual amount shall be available on October 1, 1989, and the remaining 50 percent on April 1, 1990, only if the President determines and certifies to the appropriate congressional committees as of each date that (1) each of the signatories to the Tripartite Agreement is in compliance with its obligations under the Agreement, (2) the Government of Cuba has complied with its obligations under Article 1 of the Bilateral Agreement (relating to the calendar for redeployment and withdrawal of Cuban troops), (3) the Cubans have not engaged in any." offensive military actions against UNITA, including the use of chemical warfare, (4) the United Nations and its affiliated agencies have terminated all funding and other support, in conformity with the United Nations impartiality package, to the South West Africa. People's Organization (SWAPO), and (5) the United Nations Angola Verification Mission is demonstrating diligence, impartiality, and professionalism in verifying the departure of Cuban troops and the recording of any troop rotations.

* See also title II, sec. 4 of the Dire Emergency Supplemental Appropriations and Transfers, Urgent Supplementals, and Correcting Enrollment Errors Act of 1989 (Public Law 101-45; 103 Stat. 120).

70 In Presidential Determination No. 91–13 of January 7, 1991 (56 F.R. 3001), the President certified that the United States had received assurances from the U.N. Secretary General and all parties to the bilateral agreement between the Governments of Angola and Cuba that all Cuban troops would be withdrawn from Angola by July 1, 1991, and that no Cuban troops would remain in Angola alter that date. The President also determined that all signatories to the tri. partite agreement among Angola, Cuba, and South Africa were in compliance with their obligations under that agreement, Cuba was complying with a agreed to calendar for redeploying and withdrawing its troope, and that Cuba had not engaged in offensive military actions, nor had it used chemical warfare. The President further determined that the United Nations and its affiliates had terminated funding and other support to SWAPO, and that the U.N. Angola Verification Mission was demonstrating diligence, impartiality and professionalism in verifying the departure of Cuban troops.

(e) Funding of these activities by the United States may not be construed as constituting recognition of any government in Angola. (f) For purposes of this section

(1) the term "Bilateral Agreement” means the Agreement Be-: tween the Governments of the People's Republic of Angola and the Republic of Cuba for the Termination of the International Mission of the Cuban Military Contingent, signed at the Unit- :, ed Nations on December 22, 1988;

(2) the term “Tripartite Agreement” means the Agreement Among the People's Republic of Angola, the Republic of Cuba, and the Republic of South Africa, signed at the United Nations on December 22, 1988; and

(3) the term "appropriate congressional committees" means the Committees on Appropriations, Foreign Affairs, and Per-; manent Select Committee on Intelligence of the House of Representatives, and the Committees on Appropriations, Foreign Relations, and the Select Committee on Intelligence of the Sen. " ate.

TITLE V-ASIA FOUNDATION 71

TITLE VI—INTER-AMERICAN FOUNDATION 72

TITLE VII-REFUGEE AND OTHER PROVISIONS

ni Title V amended sx 404 of the Asia Foundation Act (Public Law 96164)

Tule VI am the Inter American Foundation Act (title IV of Public Lav 91–175) For text, $** Le

Relais Throat 1994, vol. 1

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