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(5) units such as the Navy Construction Battalion are uniquely qualified to construct such facilities in an eastern bloc

country. (b) STATEMENT OF POLICY.-It is the sense of the Congress that,

(1) the Department of State should proceed in a timely fashion to negotiate an agreement with the Government of Hungary to allow for the construction of new chancery facilities in Budapest which would totally segregate sensitive activities from those of an unclassified and public-oriented character; and

(2) any such agreement should ensure that the United States Government will have the right to employ only American construction personnel and materials and will have complete control over access to the chancery site from the inception of construction.

PART D-PERSONNEL MATTERS SEC. 171.48 COMMISSION TO STUDY FOREIGN SERVICE PERSONNEL

SYSTEM. In consultation with the Committee on Foreign Relations of the Senate, the Committee on Foreign Affairs and the Committee on Post Office and Civil Service of the House of Representatives, and the exclusive representatives (as defined in section 1002(9) of the Foreign Service Act of 1980), the Secretary shall appoint a commission of five distinguished members, at least four of whom shall have a minimum of ten years experience in personnel management. The Commission shall conduct a study of the Foreign Service personnel system, with a view toward developing a system that provides adequate career stability to the members of the Service. Not more than 1 year after the date of enactment of this Act, the Commission shall transmit its report and recommendations to the Secretary of State, the Chairman of the Committee on Foreign Relations of the Senate, the Chairman of the Committee on Foreign Affairs of the House of Representatives, and the Chairman of the Committee on Post Office and Civil Service of the House of Representatives. SEC. 172.49 PROTECTION OF CIVIL SERVICE EMPLOYEES. (a) FINDINGS.—The Congress finds that,

(1) the effectiveness and efficiency of the Department of State is dependent not only on the contribution of Foreign Service employees but equally on the contribution of the 42 percent of the Department's employees who are employed under the Civil Service personnel system;

(2) the contribution of these Civil Service employees has been overlooked in the management of the Department and greater equality of promotion, training, and career enhancement opportunities should be accorded to the Civil Service employees of the Department; and

(3) a goal of the Foreign Service Act of 1980 was to strengthen the contribution made by Civil Service employees of the De

48 See also sec. 150 of the Foreign Relations Authorization Act, Fiscal Years 1992 and 1993 (Public Law 102–138; 105 Slat. 671).

48 22 U.S.C. 2664a.

SEC. 161.46 * * *
SEC. 162. APPLICATION OF TRAVEL RESTRICTIONS TO PERSONNEL

OF CERTAIN COUNTRIES AND ORGANIZATIONS. (a) 47 * * *

(b) EFFECTIVE DATE.-Subsection (a) of the section enacted by this section shall take effect 90 days after the date of enactment of this Act. SEC. 163. COUNTERINTELLIGENCE POLYGRAPH SCREENING OF DIP

LOMATIC SECURITY SERVICE PERSONNEL. (a) IMPLEMENTATION OF PROGRAM.–Under the regulations issued pursuant to subsection (b), the Secretary of State shall implement a program of counterintelligence polygraph examinations for members of the Diplomatic Security Service (established pursuant to title II of the Diplomatic Security Act) during fiscal years 1988 and 1989.

(b) REGULATIONS.—The Secretary of State shall issue regulations to govern the program required by subsection (a). Such regulations shall provide that the scope of the examinations under such program, the conduct of such examinations, and the rights of individuals subject to such examinations shall be the same as those under the counterintelligence polygraph program conducted pursuant to section 1221 of the Department of Defense Authorization Act, 1986 (Public Law 99–145). SEC. 164. UNITED STATES EMBASSY IN HUNGARY. (a) FINDINGS.—The Congress finds that,

(1) the full implementation of the security program of a United States diplomatic mission to a Communist country cannot be accomplished if employees of that mission who are citizens of the host country are present in the same facilities where diplomatic and consular activities of a sensitive nature are performed;

(2) the facilities currently housing the offices of the United States diplomatic mission to Hungary are totally inadequate for the proper conduct of United States diplomatic activities, and unnecessarily expose United States personnel and their activities to the scrutiny of the intelligence services of the Government of Hungary;

(3) the presence of local citizens in a facility where sensitive activities are performed, as well as their access to certain unclassified administrative information, greatly enhances the ability of the host government's intelligence services to restrict our diplomatic activities in that country;

(4) since the United States Government owns a substantial amount of property in Budapest, it is in a unique position to build new facilities which will substantially enhance the security of the United States diplomatic mission to Hungary; and

46 Sec. 161 added a new subsec. (d) at sec. 205 of the State Department Basic Authorities Act of 1956 (Public Law 84-885; 70 Stat. 890). It prohibited the acquisition of real property in the United States by certain foreign countries if it is determined that such acquisition would im

lities for hostile intelligence activities against the United States. 47 Subsec. (a) added a new sec. 216 to the State Department Basic Authorities Act of 1956 (Public Law 84-885; 70 Slat. 890). It applied to individuals of certain countries and organizations the same generally applicable restrictions to travel while in the United States that apply to members of the missions of the Soviet Union in the United States.

(5) units such as the Navy Construction Battalion are uniquely qualified to construct such facilities in an eastern bloc

country. (b) STATEMENT OF POLICY.—It is the sense of the Congress that,

(1) the Department of State should proceed in a timely fashion to negotiate an agreement with the Government of Hungary to allow for the construction of new chancery facilities in Budapest which would totally segregate sensitive activities from those of an unclassified and public-oriented character; and

(2) any such agreement should ensure that the United States Government will have the right to employ only American construction personnel and materials and will have complete control over access to the chancery site from the inception of construction.

PART D-PERSONNEL MATTERS SEC. 171.48 COMMISSION TO STUDY FOREIGN SERVICE PERSONNEL

SYSTEM. In consultation with the Committee on Foreign Relations of the Senate, the Committee on Foreign Affairs and the Committee on Post Office and Civil Service of the House of Representatives, and the exclusive representatives (as defined in section 1002(9) of the Foreign Service Act of 1980), the Secretary shall appoint a commission of five distinguished members, at least four of whom shall have a minimum of ten years experience in personnel management. The Commission shall conduct a study of the Foreign Service personnel system, with a view toward developing a system that provides adequate career stability to the members of the Service. Not more than 1 year after the date of enactment of this Act, the Commission shall transmit its report and recommendations to the Secretary of State, the Chairman of the Committee on Foreign Relations of the Senate, the Chairman of the Committee on Foreign Affairs of the House of Representatives, and the Chairman of the Committee on Post Office and Civil Service of the House of Representatives. SEC. 172.49 PROTECTION OF CIVIL SERVICE EMPLOYEES. (a) FINDINGS.—The Congress finds that,

(1) the effectiveness and efficiency of the Department of State is dependent not only on the contribution of Foreign Service employees but equally on the contribution of the 42 percent of the Department's employees who are employed under the Civil Service personnel system;

(2) the contribution of these Civil Service employees has been overlooked in the management of the Department and greater equality of promotion, training, and career enhancement opportunities should be accorded to the Civil Service employees of the Department; and

(3) a goal of the Foreign Service Act of 1980 was to strengthen the contribution made by Civil Service employees of the De

18 See also sec. 150 of the Foreign Relations Authorization Act, Fiscal Years 1992 and 1993 (Public Law 102-138; 105 Stat. 671).

49 22 U.S.C. 2664a.

SEC. 161.46 * * *
SEC. 162. APPLICATION OF TRAVEL RESTRICTIONS TO PERSONNEL

OF CERTAIN COUNTRIES AND ORGANIZATIONS. (a) 47 * * *

(b) EFFECTIVE DATE.-Subsection (a) of the section enacted by this section shall take effect 90 days after the date of enactment of this Act. SEC. 163. COUNTERINTELLIGENCE POLYGRAPH SCREENING OF DIP.

LOMATIC SECURITY SERVICE PERSONNEL. (a) IMPLEMENTATION OF PROGRAM.—Under the regulations issued pursuant to subsection (b), the Secretary of State shall implement a program of counterintelligence polygraph examinations for members of the Diplomatic Security Service (established pursuant to title II of the Diplomatic Security Act) during fiscal years 1988 and 1989.

(b) REGULATIONS.—The Secretary of State shall issue regulations to govern the program required by subsection (a). Such regulations shall provide that the scope of the examinations under such program, the conduct of such examinations, and the rights of individuals subject to such examinations shall be the same as those under the counterintelligence polygraph program conducted pursuant to section 1221 of the Department of Defense Authorization Act, 1986 (Public Law 99-145). SEC. 164. UNITED STATES EMBASSY IN HUNGARY. (a) FINDINGS.—The Congress finds that,

(1) the full implementation of the security program of a United States diplomatic mission to a Communist country cannot be accomplished if employees of that mission who are citizens of the host country are present in the same facilities where diplomatic and consular activities of a sensitive nature are performed;

(2) the facilities currently housing the offices of the United States diplomatic mission to Hungary are totally inadequate for the proper conduct of United States diplomatic activities, and unnecessarily expose United States personnel and their activities to the scrutiny of the intelligence services of the Government of Hungary;

(3) the presence of local citizens in a facility where sensitive activities are performed, as well as their access to certain unclassified administrative information, greatly enhances the ability of the host government's intelligence services to restrict our diplomatic activities in that country;

(4) since the United States Government owns a substantial amount of property in Budapest, it is in a unique position to build new facilities which will substantially enhance the security of the United States diplomatic mission to Hungary; and (5) units such as the Navy Construction Battalion are uniquely qualified to construct such facilities in an eastern bloc

48 Sec. 161 added a new subsec. (d) at sec. 205 of the State Department Basic Authorities Act of 1956 (Public Law 84-885; 70 Stat. 890). It prohibited the acquisition of real property in the United States by certain foreign countries if it is determined that such acquisition would improve capabilities for hostile intelligence activities against the United States.

47 Subsec. (a) added a new sec. 216 to the State Department Basic Authorities Act of 1956 (Public Law 84885; 70 Slat. 890). It applied to individuals of certain countries and organizations the same generally applicable restrictions to travel while in the United States that apply to members of the missions of the Soviet Union in the United States.

country. (b) STATEMENT OF POLICY.-It is the sense of the Congress that

(1) the Department of State should proceed in a timely fashion to negotiate an agreement with the Government of Hungary to allow for the construction of new chancery facilities in Budapest which would totally segregate sensitive activities from those of an unclassified and public-oriented character; and

(2) any such agreement should ensure that the United States Government will have the right to employ only American construction personnel and materials and will have complete control over access to the chancery site from the inception of construction.

PART D-PERSONNEL MATTERS SEC. 171.48 COMMISSION TO STUDY FOREIGN SERVICE PERSONNEL

SYSTEM. In consultation with the Committee on Foreign Relations of the Senate, the Committee on Foreign Affairs and the Committee on Post Office and Civil Service of the House of Representatives, and the exclusive representatives (as defined in section 1002(9) of the Foreign Service Act of 1980), the Secretary shall appoint a commission of five distinguished members, at least four of whom shall have a minimum of ten years experience in personnel management. The Commission shall conduct a study of the Foreign Service personnel system, with a view toward developing a system that provides adequate career stability to the members of the Service. Not more than 1 year after the date of enactment of this Act, the Commission shall transmit its report and recommendations to the Secretary of State, the Chairman of the Committee on Foreign Relations of the Senate, the Chairman of the Committee on Foreign Affairs of the House of Representatives, and the Chairman of the Committee on Post Office and Civil Service of the House of Representatives. SEC. 172.49 PROTECTION OF CIVIL SERVICE EMPLOYEES. (a) FINDINGS.—The Congress finds that,

(1) the effectiveness and efficiency of the Department of State is dependent not only on the contribution of Foreign Service employees but equally on the contribution of the 42 percent of the Department's employees who are employed under the Civil Service personnel system;

(2) the contribution of these Civil Service employees has been overlooked in the management of the Department and greater equality of promotion, training, and career enhancement opportunities should be accorded to the Civil Service employees of the Department; and

(3) a goal of the Foreign Service Act of 1980 was to strengthen the contribution made by Civil Service employees of the De

* See also sec. 150 of the Foreign Relations Authorization Act, Fiscal Years 1992 and 1993 (Public Law 102-138; 105 Slat. 671).

40 22 U.S.C. 2664a.

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