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the rank of Ambassador at Large immediately before the date of enactment of this Act during the period such individual continues to serve in such position. SEC. 179. FOREIGN SERVICE CAREER CANDIDATES TAX TREATMENT.

(a) 55 * * *

(b) EFFECTIVE DATE.-The amendment made by subsection (a) shall apply with respect to tax years beginning after December 31, 1987. SEC. 180. PROHIBITION ON MEMBER OF A FOREIGN SERVICE UNION

NEGOTLATING ON BEHALF OF THE DEPARTMENT OF

STATE. It is the sense of Congress that the Secretary of State should take steps to assure that in labor-management negotiations between the Department of State and the exclusive representative of the Foreign Service employees of the Department, those who direct and conduct negotiations on behalf of management are not also beneficiaries of the agreements made with the exclusive representative. SEC. 181. CLARIFICATION OF JURISDICTION OF FOREIGN SERVICE

GRIEVANCE BOARD.

(e) APPLICATION.—The amendments made by this section shall not apply with respect to any grievance in which the Board has issued a final decision pursuant to section 1107 of the Foreign Seryice Act of 1980 (22 U.S.C. 4137) before the date of enactment of this Act.

SEC. 183.56 WOMEN AND MINORITIES IN THE FOREIGN SERVICE.

(a) FINDINGS.—The Congress finds that the Department of State and other Foreign Service agencies have not been successful in their efforts

(1) to recruit and retain members of minority groups in order to increase significantly the number of members of minority groups in the Foreign Service; and

(2) to provide adequate career advancement for women and members of minority groups in order to increase significantly the numbers of women and members of minority groups in the

senior levels of the Foreign Service. (b) A MORE REPRESENTATIVE FOREIGN SERVICE.—The Secretary of State and the head of each of the other agencies utilizing the Foreign Service personnel system,

(1) shall substantially increase their efforts to implement effectively the plans required by section 152(a) of the Foreign Relations Authorization Act, Fiscal Years 1986 and 1987, so that the Foreign Service becomes truly representative of the American people throughout all levels of the Foreign Service; and

B6 Subsec. (a) amended sec. 3010dX3) of the Foreign Service Act of 1980 (Public Law 96-465; 94 Stat. 2071). It prohibited career foreign service employees from representing themselves to income tax authorities of the District of Columbia or any other State as exempt from income taxation.

88 22 U.S.C. 3922a note.

(2) shall ensure that those plans effectively address the need to promote increased numbers of qualified women and members of minority groups into the senior levels of the Foreign

Service. (c) DEPARTMENT OF STATE HIRING PRACTICES OF MINORITIES AND WOMEN.—The Secretary of State shall include annually as part of the report required to be submitted pursuant to section 105(d)(2) of the Foreign Service Act of 1980–

(1) a report on the progress made at the Assistant Secretary and Bureau level of the Department of State in increasing the presence of minorities and women at all levels in the Foreign Service and Civil Service workforces of the Department of State, and

(2) the specific actions taken to address the lack of Hispanic Americans, Asian Americans, and Native Americans in the Senior Executive Service and Senior Foreign Service of the De

partment of State. SEC. 184. COMPLIANCE WITH LAW REQUIRING REPORTS TO CON.

GRESS. (a) COMPLIANCE WITH PRIOR REQUEST.–Within 90 days after the date of enactment of this Act, the Secretary of State shall submit to the chairmen and ranking members of the Committee on Foreign Relations and the Committee on Governmental Affairs of the Senate, and the Committee on Foreign Affairs, the Committee on Post Office and Civil Service, and the Committee on Government Operations of the House of Representatives, a report complying with the 1984 request of the Senate Committee on Governmental Affairs for a listing and description of all policy and supporting positions in the Department of State and related agencies. The report shall include an unclassified tabulation, as of the 1984 request, of the following:

(1) All Foreign Service officer positions then occupied by noncareer appointees.

(2) All positions in the Senior Foreign Service subject to noncareer appointment.

(3) The name of the incumbent; location; type; level, grade, or salary; tenure, and expiration (if any) of each position. (b) COMPLIANCE WITH FUTURE REQUESTS.—Whenever the Committee on Governmental Affairs of the Senate or the Committee on Post Office and Civil Service of the House of Representatives requests information from the Secretary of State for inclusion in the publication “U.S. Government Policy and Supporting Positions”, the Secretary shall provide such information in a timely manner.

SEC. 186. DISPOSITION OF PERSONAL PROPERTY ABROAD.

(a) 57 * *

*

(b) EFFECTIVE DATE.-This section shall take effect 180 days after the date of enactment of this Act.

67 Subsec. (a) added a new title III to the State Department Basic Authorities Act of 1956 (Public Law 84 885; 70 Stat. 890).

SEC. 188.68 * * *

TITLE II—THE UNITED STATES INFORMATION

AGENCY 59

TITLE IN-EDUCATIONAL AND CULTURAL AFFAIRS 60

TITLE IV-VOICE OF AMERICA 61

* # #

TITLE V—THE BOARD FOR INTERNATIONAL

BROADCASTING 62

*

TITLE VI–ASIA FOUNDATION 63

*

TITLE VII–INTERNATIONAL ORGANIZATIONS

PART A—UNITED NATIONS SEC. 701.64 PROBABLE EXEMPTIONS TO THE UNITED NATIONS EM

PLOYEE HIRING FREEZE. (a) FINDINGS.-The Congress makes the following findings:

(1) In April 1986, the Secretary-General of the United Nations adopted a freeze on the hiring of personnel within the United Nations Secretariat.

(2) The conditions of the freeze were such that, as the terms of office for the personnel expired, replacements would not be recruited or hired to fill the vacant positions, with minor exceptions.

(3) The freeze was designed to reduce United Nations personnel by 15 percent over three years, as recommended by the Group of High-Level Intergovernmental Experts to Review the Efficiency of the Administrative and Financial Functioning of the United Nations (commonly referred to as the “Group of 18 Experts”).

(4) On May 5, 1987, the Secretary-General reported to the Department of State that he was considering granting 156 exceptions to the hiring freeze.

(5) Of these 156 probable exceptions, 104 would be Soviet and Soviet-bloc nationals currently employed in the United Nations Secretariat—of 298 Soviet and Soviet-bloc nationals currently employed in the United Nations Secretariat-who would be replaced over the next 18 months.

58 Sec. 188 added new secs. 830, 831 and 832 to the Foreign Service Act of 1980 (Public Law 96_465; 94 Stat., 2071) concerning benefits for certain former spouses of members of the foreign service.

59 See page 946 for text of free-standing provisions in this title. 20 See page 950 for text of free-standing provisions in this title. 61 See page 952 for text of free-standing provisions in this title.

62 Most of title V contained amendments to the Board for International Broadcasting Act of 1973. For text of free-standing provisions, see page 1126.

3 Title VI amended sec. 404 of the Asia Foundation Act (Public Law 98–164). 04 22 U.S.C. 287e note.

(6) According to a report from the Select Committee on Intelligence of the Senate on "Soviet Presence in the United Nations Secretariat” (Senate Print 99–52, May 1985), approximately one-fourth of the Soviets in the United Nations Secretariat are intelligence officers, many more are co-opted by the Soviet intelligence agencies, and all Soviets in the United Nations Secretariat must respond to KGB requests for assistance.

(7) Other United States intelligence authorities estimate that as many as one-half of the Soviet and Soviet-bloc nationals in the United Nations Secretariat are officers of the KGB or the GRU.

(8) If the Secretary-General's probable exemptions are adopted, the Soviet Union will be allowed to replace retiring Soviet and Soviet-bloc personnel with new, highly skilled and welltrained intelligence officers of the KGB or the GRU.

(9) The Secretary-General's proposed exceptions would thus provide the Soviet Union with the capability to rebuild its intelligence apparatus within the United States, which was devastated in recent years when the United States ordered severe reductions in the size of the Soviet mission to the United Nations, the Soviet Embassy in Washington, District of Columbia, and the Soviet Consulate in San Francisco, California.

(10) Article 100 of the United Nations Charter calls for the establishment of an international civil service whose members are neutral and loyal only to the United Nations.

(11) Section 3 of Article 101 of the United Nations Charter calls for the appointment of individuals who are professionally qualified for the positions they are to fill and maintains that due regard shall be paid to the importance of recruiting the staff on as wide a geographical basis as possible.

(12) As of September 1985, 442 of 446 Soviet nationals ernployed throughout the United Nations system are "seconded", that is, serve on short, fixed-term contracts.

(13) Through the abuse of short, fixed-term contracts, the Soviet Union has maintained undue influence and control over major offices of the United Nations Secretariat, thereby effectively using the United Nations Secretariat in the conduct of its foreign relations, in clear violation of Articles 100 and 101 of the United Nations Charter.

(14) The Secretary-General's proposed exceptions to the hiring freeze (as described in paragraphs (1) through (5)) would continue the gross violations of Articles 100 and 101 of the United Nations Charter described in paragraph (13).

(15) The Secretary-General's proposed exceptions to such hiring freeze would be clearly inconsistent with the terms of the United Nation's self-imposed reform program.

(16) The United Nations has not yet achieved its reform goals and there is no indication that the United Nations can afford to make such large exceptions to such hiring freeze.

., SENSE OF THE CONGRESS.-It is the sense of the Congress

(1) the President should take all such actions necessary to ensure compliance with the hiring freeze rule, including withholding all assessed United States contributions to the United Vations, and denying Cnited States entry visas to Soviet and Soviet-bloc applicants coming to the United States to replace Sovet and Soviet-bloc nationals currently serving in the United Nations Secretariat;

(2) the President, through the Department of State and the United States mission to the United Nations, should express to the Secretary-General of the United Nations the insistence of the American people that the hiring freeze continue indefinitely, or until the United Nations has complied with the Group of 18 recommendations and can thus afford to make exceptions to the freeze;

(3) the Secretary-General should revoke all exceptions to the hiring freeze rule, excepting those member-nations which have 15 or fewer nationals serving in the United Nations Secretariat, or those positions not subject to geographical representation, such as those of the general service category;

(4) the long-term, flagrant violations of Articles 100 and 101 of the United Nations Charter and the abuse of secondment by the Soviet Union and Soviet-bloc member-nations are reprehensible;

(5) the United Nations should adopt the recommendations of the Group of 18 (as referred to in subsection (a)(3)) that no member-nation be allowed to have more than 50 percent of its nationals employed under fixed-term contracts; (6) the Soviet Union is hereby condemned for

(A) its refusal to adhere to the principles of the United Nations Charter calling for an international civil service,

(B) its abuse of secondment, and

(C) its absolute disregard of the solemn purpose of the United Nations to be an international civil service; and (7) if the Soviet Union and the Soviet-bloc intend to remain member-nations of the United Nations, they should adhere to Articles 100, 101, and all other principles of the United Nations Charter to which every other member-nation must ad

here. (c) 66 DEFINITION.-For the purposes of this section, the term “Soviet-bloc" means the countries of Bulgaria, Cuba, Czechoslovakia, East Germany, Hungary, Nicaragua, North Korea, Poland, and Romania. SEC. 702. REFORM IN THE BUDGET DECISION-MAKING PROCEDURES

OF THE UNITED NATIONS AND ITS SPECIALIZED AGEN.

CIES. (a) FINDINGS. --The Congress finds that the consensus based decision-making procedure established by General Assembly Resolution

en Nee. 163 of the Foreign Relations Authorization Act, Fiscal Years 1992 and 1993 (Public TIN; 106 Stat. 676), struck out subsore. (b). and

as (b) and (c), rompeuvely. Subsec. (b) had required the Secretary of State to report annually to the ('

W ome on the status of secondment within the United Nations by the Soviet Union and Nuviet ble member nation

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