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(3) consider prompi Citson of a scint Gorenentported program to dete10 de asetective technolages that will facimate redaran d ar donde escons and other copollutants,

(4) instrort the Seray of State to report to the Congress no later than December 1, 1983, on the prosesi teward stering a new trazsoday at poison agræment, including & cooperative programs on des techncioges

INTERNATIONAL AGFEEVENTS ON NATURAL GAS SEC. 1009. (a) The Corgress finds that,

(1) the foreign po.ity and economic well-being of the United States depend on mutia.y beneficial relationships with our trading partners throughout the world;

(2) America's present economie dificulties have been caused in part by the huge increases in the price of energy, especially imported energy, during the 1970's;

(3) at a time when prices for other forms of energy are stebilizing or falhing, the burner-tip price of natural gas continues to rise throughout the United States;

(4) the high price of natural gas is a severe hardship for lowincome persons, the elderly, the agricultural industry, small businesses, and other consumers without alternative fuel sources;

(5) high-priced imported natural gas is a major factor contributing to these price increases;

(6) imports of high-priced natural gas continue at prices above fair market levels, despite the increased availability of uncommitted and ample supplies of lower priced domestic gas;

(7) it is in the interest of the United States to continue to import natural gas from secure sources in whatever quantity consumers require, as long as the price is fair;

(8) the principles of free and fair international trade require that natural gas prices and terms of trade be made fair to all trading partners; and

(9) the immediacy of this problem requires the prompt and serious attention of all parties involved. (b) It is the sense of the Congress that,

(1) the United States Government should move immediately to promote lower prices and fair market conditions for imported natural gas; and

(2) within thirty days after the date of enactment of this section, the Secretary of State, with the assistance of the Secretary of Energy, should prepare and transmit to the Congress a report on the progress made in achieving lower prices and fair market conditions for imported natural gas. PREPUBLICATION REVIEW OF WRITINGS OF FORMER FEDERAL

EMPLOYEES SEC. 1010. The head of a department or agency of the Government may not, before April 15, 1984, enforce, issue, or implement any rule, regulation, directive, policy, decision, or order which (1) would require any officer or employee to submit, after termination

of employment with the Government, his or her writings for prepublication review by an officer or employee of the Government, and (2) is different from the rules, regulations, directives, policies, decisions, or orders (relating to prepublication review of such writings) in effect on March 1, 1983.

EXTENDED VOLUNTARY DEPARTURE STATUS FOR CERTAIN

EL SALVADORANS SEC. 1012. (a) The Congress finds that,

(1) ongoing fighting between the military forces of the Gov. ernment of El Salvador and opposition forces is creating potentially life-threatening situations for innocent nationals of El Salvador;

(2) thousands of El Salvadoran nationals have fled from El Salvador and entered the United States since January 1980;

(3) currently the United States Government is detaining these nationals of El Salvador for the purpose of deporting or otherwise returning them to El Salvador, thereby irreparably harming the foreign policy image of the United States;

(4) deportation of these nationals could be temporarily suspended, until it became safe to return to El Salvador, if they are provided with extended voluntary departure status; and

(5) such extended voluntary departure status has been granted in recent history in cases of nationals who fled from Vietnam, Laos, Iran, and Nicaragua. (b) Therefore, it is the sense of the Congress that,

(1) the Secretary of State should recommend that extended voluntary departure status be granted to aliens,

(A) who are nationals of El Salvador,

(B) who have been in the United States since before January 1, 1983,

(C) who otherwise qualify for voluntary departure (in lieu of deportation) under section 242(b) or 244(e) of the Immigration and Nationality Act (8 U.S.C. 1252(b) and 1254(e)), and

(D) who were not excludable from the United States at the time of their entry on any ground specified in section 212(a) of the Immigration and Nationality Act (8 U.S.C. 1182(a)) other than the grounds described in paragraphs

(14), (15), (20), (21), and (25); and (2) such status should be granted to those aliens until the situation in El Salvador has changed sufficiently to permit

their safely residing in that country. EXPEDITED PROCEDURES FOR CERTAIN JOINT RESOLUTIONS AND BILLS

SEC. 1013.37 Any joint resolution or bill introduced in either House which requires the removal of United States Armed Forces engaged in hostilities outside the territory of the United States, its possessions and territories, without a declaration of war or specific statutory authorization shall be considered in accordance with the procedures of section 601(b) of the International Security Assistance and Arms Export Control Act of 1976, except that any such resolution or bill shall be amendable. If such a joint resolution or bill should be vetoed by the President, the time for debate in consideration of the veto message on such measure shall be limited to twenty hours in the Senate and in the House shall be determined in accordance with the Rules of the House.

37 50 U.S.C. 1546a.

k. Department of State Authorization Act, Fiscal Years 1982

and 1983

Partial text of Public Law 97–241 (S. 1193), 96 Stat. 273, approved August

24, 1982, as amended by Public Law 98–164 (Department of State Author ization Act, Fiscal Years 1984 and 1985; H.R. 2916), 97 Stat. 1017 at 1030, approved November 22, 1983; Public Law 103–199 (FRIENDSHIP Act, H.R. 3000), 107 Stat. 2317, approved December 17, 1993; Public Law 103–236 (Foreign Relations Authorization Act, Fiscal Years 1994 and 1996; H.R. 2333), 108 Stat. 382, approved April 30, 1994

AN ACT To authorize appropriations for fiscal years 1982 and 1983 for the Depart

ment of State, the International Communication Agency, and the Board for International Broadcasting, and for other purposes.

NOTE.-Sections in this Act amend other State Department and foreign relations legislation and are incorporated elsewhere in this compilation.

Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled,

TITLE I—DEPARTMENT OF STATE

SHORT TITLE SEC. 101. This title may be cited as the “Department of State Authorization Act, Fiscal Years 1982 and 1983”.

AUTHORIZATIONS OF APPROPRIATIONS SEC. 102. There are authorized to be appropriated for the Department of State to carry out the authorities, functions, duties, and responsibilities in the conduct of the foreign affairs of the United States and other purposes authorized by law, the following amounts:

(1) For "Administration of Foreign Affairs”, $1,245,637,000 for the fiscal year 19821 and $1,248,059,000 for the fiscal year 1983.2

(2) For "International Organizations and Conferences", $503,462,000 for the fiscal year 1982 3 and $514,436,000 for the fiscal year 1983.4

(3) For "International Commissions", $19,808,000 for the fiscal year 19825 and $22,432,000 for the fiscal year 1983.6

1 Sec. 101(h) of Continuing Appropriations, 1982 (Public Law 97-92; 95 Stat 1183), and H.R 4169, as passed by the House and made part of Public Law 97-92, appropriated $1,176,381,000 for the "Administration of Foreign Affairs" during fiscal year 1962, itemized in the following manner. salaries and expensco-$890,758,000; representation allowances-$3,570,000; acquisition, operation, and maintenance of buildings abroad-$185.970.000: acquisition, operation and maintenance of buildings abroad (special foreign currency program)$9,102,000; emergencies in the diplomatic and consular service-$4,400,000; buying power maintenance-$1,500,000; pay. ment to the American Institute in Taiwan-$7,884,000; and payment to the Foreign Service Retirement and Disability Fund-$73,197,000.

Subsequently, the Supplemental Appropriations Act, 1982 (Public Law 97-257; 96 Stat. 819 at 822), provided the following additional amounts: salaries and expenses_$37,978,000, of which $31,228,000 shall remain available until Sept. 30, 1984; acquisition, operation, and maintenance of buildings abroad-$17,655,000, to remain available until Sept. 30, 1984; payment to the American Institute in Taiwan-$244,000; and payment to the Foreign Service Retirement and Disability Fund-$4,615,000.

a Sec. 101(d) of the Further Continuing Appropriations Act, 1983 (Public Law 97-377; 96 Stat. 1830 at 1876), and S. 2956, as reported in the Senate on Sept. 24, 1982, and made part of Public Law 97_377, appropriated $1,310,232,000 for "Administration of Foreign Affairs" during fiscal year 1983, itemized in following manner: salaries and expenses—$995,000,000; reopening consulates-$1,000,000; representation allowances_$3,876,000; acquisition, operation, and maintenance or buildings abroad-$193,040,000; acquisition, operation, and maintenance of buildings abroad (special foreign currency program,$8,360,000; emergencies in the diplomatic and consular service $4,400,000; buying power maintenance_$4,500,000; payment to the American Institute in Taiwan-$8,744,000; and payment to the Foreign Service Retirement and Disability Fund $91,312,000.

In addition to the regular fiscal year 1983 appropriation of $1,310,232,000 for the "Administration of Foreign Affairs" contained in Public Law 97-377, the Supplemental Appropriations Act, 1983 (Public Law 98-63) provided the following amounts: salaries and expenses$7,985,000, acquisition, operation, and maintenance of buildings abroad—$22,256,000; payment to the Foreign Serviæ Retirement and Disability Fund-$4,658,000; and salaries and expenses (increased pay costs)$21,711,000, of which $8,111,000 was derived by transfer from contributions to the international organizations.

3 Sec. 101(h) of the Continuing Appropriations Act, 1982 (Public Law 97–92; 95 Stat. 1183) and H.R. 4169, as passed by the House and made part of Public Law 97-92, appropriated $466,462,000 for "International Organizations and Conlerences" during fiscal year 1982 itemized in the following manner. contributions to international organizations-$398,240,000 including funds for the payment of assessed contributions to the Pan American Health Organization, and to reimburse the Pan American Health Organization for payments under the tax equalization program for employees who are U.S. citizens; contributions for international peacekeeping activities $60,938,000; international conferences and contingencies $7,284,000.

*Sec. 101(d) or the Further Continuing Appropriations Act, 1983 (Public Law 97-377; 96 Stat. 1830 at 1877), and S. 2956, as reported in the Senate on Sept. 24, 1982, and made part of Public Law 97_377, appropriated $526,915,000 for "International Organizations and Conferences" during fiscal year 1983 itemized in the following manner: contributions to international organizations—$444,315,000, of which $12,506,000 shall be for payment of the full 1983 assessed contributions to the Inter-American Institute for Cooperation on Agriculture; contributions for international peacekceping activities—$73,400,000, of which not more than $50,000,000 shall be available for contributions to a United Nations Transition Assistance Group, upon a determination by the President; and international conferences and contingencies—$9,200,000.

Sec. 101(h) of the Continuing Appropriations Act, 1982 (Public Law 97–92; 95 Slat. 1183), and H.R. 4169. as passed by the House and made part of Public Law 97-92. appropriated $20,197,000 for "International Commissions" during fiscal year 1982 itemized in the following manner: International Boundary and Water Commission, United States and Mexico, salaries and expenses_$7,927,000, and for delailed plan preparation and construction of authorized projects—$1,186,000; American sections, international commissions—$2,847,000; and international fisheries commissions—$8,237,000. Subsequently, the Supplemental Appropriations Act, 1982 (Public Law 97-257; 96 Slat. 819 at 823) provided the following additional amounts: American Sections, International Commissions—$95,000 for the International Joint Commission to remain available until Sept. 30, 1983.

Sec. 101(d) of the Further Continuing Appropriations Act, 1983 (Public Law 97-377; 96 Stat. 1830 at 1866), and S. 2956, as reported in the Senate on Sept. 24, 1982 and made part of Public Law 97-377, appropriated $20,198,000 for "International Commissions" during fiscal year 1983 itemized in the following manner: International Boundary and Water Commission, United

Continued

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