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ing a mandatory arms embargo on Uganda by all members of

the United Nations. EQUITABLE TREATMENT OF UNITED STATES CITIZENS LIVING ABROAD SEC. 611.36 The Congress finds that,

(1) United States citizens living abroad should be provided fair and equitable treatment by the United States Government with regard to taxation, citizenship of progeny, veterans' benefits, voting rights, Social Security benefits, and other obligations, rights, and benefits; and

(2) 37 United States statutes and regulations should be designed so as not to create competitive disadvantage for individual American citizens living abroad or working in international markets.

UNITED STATES-CANADIAN NEGOTIATIONS ON AIR QUALITY SEC. 612.38 (a) The Congress finds that,

(1) the United States and Canada share a common environment along a 5,500 mile border;

(2) the United States and Canada are both becoming increasingly concerned about the effects of pollution, particularly that resulting from power generation facilities, since the facilities of each country affect the environment of the other;

(3) the United States and Canada have subscribed to international conventions; have joined in the environmental work of the United Nations, the Organization for Economic Cooperation and Development, and other international environmental forums; and have entered into and implemented effectively the provisions of the historic Boundary Waters Treaty of 1909; and

(4) the United States and Canada have a tradition of cooperative resolution of issues of mutual concern which is nowhere

more evident than in the environmental area. (b) It is the sense of the Congress that the President should make every effort to negotiate a cooperative agreement with the Government of Canada aimed at preserving the mutual airshed of the United States and Canada so as to protect and enhance air resources and insure the attainment and maintenance of air quality protective of public health and welfare.

(c) It is further the sense of the Congress that the President, through the Secretary of State working in concert with interested Federal agencies and the affected States, should take whatever diplomatic actions appear necessary to reduce or eliminate any unde

38 22 U.S.C. 1731 note. Sec. 505(a) of Public Law 97-241 (96 Stat. 299) repealed subsec. (b) of this section. Subsec. (b), as amended by sec. 407(b) of Public Law 96-60, had required a report from the President identifying all U.S. statutes and regulations which treat U.S. citizens living abroad differently from U.S. citizens living in the United States or which may cause competitive disadvantage for Americans working abroad relative to the treatment by other major trading nations of the world of their citizens who are working abroad. The report also required an evaluation of such practices and drasl legislation to correct any unfair or competitively disad. vantageous treatment. The President submitted reports pursuant to this requirement on August 27, 1979, and January 24, 1980.

37 Paragraph (2) was amended and restated by sec. 407(a) of Public Law 96-60 (93 Stat. 405). It formerly read as follows: “(2) such fair and equitable treatment would be facilitated by a periodic review of statutes and regulations allecting Americans living abroad."

38 42 U.S.C. 7415 note.

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sirable impact upon the United States and Canada resulting from air pollution from any source.

CUBAN PRESENCE IN AFRICA SEC. 613.39 The Congress finds that

(1) the President authorized the exchange of notes of May 30, 1977, between the Governments of the United States and Cuba which established an Interests Section for the United States in the Embassy of Switzerland in Havana and an Interests Section for Cuba in the Embassy of Czechoslovakia in Washington;

(2) the President has the authority under the Export Administration Act of 1969 to limit trade with Cuba being conducted by subsidiaries of American firms operating in third countries;

(3) the President has the power to sever all diplomatic and economic relations with Cuba; and

(4) there has been a sharp increase in the number of Cuban military personnel serving in Africa in the past year.

PALESTINIAN RIGHTS UNITS

SEC. 614. (a) The Congress, noting United Nations General Assembly Resolution 3376 (XXX) which established the Committee on the Exercise of the Inalienable Rights of the Palestinian People and noting United Nations General Assembly Resolutions 32/40/A and 32/40/B which continued the mandate of that Committee and requested that the Secretary General establish within the Secretariat of the United Nations a Special Unit on Palestinian Rights, declares that,

(1) the continuation of the Committee on the Exercise of the Inalienable Rights of the Palestinian People and the creation of the Special Unit on Palestinian Rights are wasteful expenditures of limited United Nations resources at a time when the United Nations is experiencing severe financial difficulties and when the United Nations is under close scrutiny from contributing members;

(2) the work of the Committee on the Exercise of the Inalienable Rights of the Palestinian People does not contribute to the process of peacemaking underway at present in the Middle East; and

(3) the United States Ambassador to the United Nations should be instructed to continue to oppose extensions of the mandate of that Committee as well as extensions of the Special

Unit on Palestinian Rights. (b) It is the sense of the Congress that the President should direct the Permanent Representative of the United States to the United Nations to use all means at his disposal to obtain action by the General Assembly terminating the Committee on the Exercise of the Inalienable Rights of the Palestinian People and the Special Unit on Palestinian Rights.

39 22 U.S.C. 2370 note. Sec. 505(a) of Public Law 97–241 (96 Stat. 299) repealed subsec. (b) of this section which had required a report from the President reviewing U.S. diplomatic and economic relations with Cuba. The President submitted this report on February 8, 1979.

TITLE VII–MISCELLANEOUS PROVISIONS

CONTRIBUTION TO THE INTERNATIONAL TIN COUNCIL SEC. 704. Effective October 1, 1978, there is authorized to be appropriated to the President $60,000,000 for the purpose of acquiring tin metal to contribute to the buffer stock of the International Tin Council established under the Fifth International Tin Agreement.

PROHIBITION ON AID OR REPARATIONS TO VIETNAM SEC. 705.40 The President shall continue to take all possible steps to obtain a final accounting of all Americans missing in action in Vietnam.

USE OF FOREIGN AIR CARRIERS SEC. 706. Notwithstanding the limitations established by section 1117 of the Federal Aviation Act of 1958 (49 U.S.C. 1517), funds appropriated after the date of enactment of this Act to the Department of State, the International Communications Agency, the Agency for International Development (or any successor agency),41 and the Arms Control and Disarmament Agency may be used to pay for the transportation, between two places both of which are outside the United States, of officers and employees of those agencies, their dependents, and accompanying baggage, aboard air carriers which do not hold certificates under section 401 of that Act.

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40 Subsec. (a), which had prohibited the use of any funds authorized to be appropriated by this Act for reparations, aid, or any other form of payment to Vietnam, was repealed by sec. 505(a X2) of Public Law 97-241 (96 Stat. 299).

41 This responsibility of AID was transferred to the Director of IDCA, pursuant to sec. 6 of Reorganization Plan No. 2 of 1979 (establishing IDCA).

42 Sec. 709, which had prohibited the use of any funds authorized to be appropriated by this Act, directly or indirectly, to effect the implementation of the Panama Canal treaties without authorization by the Constitution or by Act of Congress, was repealed by sec. 505(aX2) of Public Law 97–241 (96 Slat. 299).

43 Sec. 711, which had authorized $1.5 million in each of the fiscal years 1979 and 1980 for a commission on global hunger and malnutrition, was repealed by sec. 505(aX2) of Public Law 97–241 (96 Slat. 299).

n. Foreign Relations Authorization Act, Fiscal Year 1978

Partial text of Public Law 95–105 (HR. 6689), 91 Stat. 844, approved August

17, 1977; as amended by Public Law 95 426 (Foreign Relations Authoriza. tion Act, Fiscal Year 1979; H.R. 12598), 92 Stat. 963, approved October 7, 1978; Public Law 96-465 (Foreign Service Act of 1980, H.R. 6790), 94 Stat. 2071 at 2160, approved October 17, 1980; Public Law 97–241 (Department of State Authorization Act, Fiscal Years 1982 and 1983; S. 1193, 96 Stat. 273 at 299, approved August 24, 1982; Public Law 103–236 (Foreign Relations Authorization Act, Fiscal Years 1994 and 1995; H.R. 2333), 108 Stat. 382, approved April 30, 1994

AN ACT To authorize fiscal year 1978 appropriations for the Department of State,

the United States Information Agency, and the Board for International Broadcast. ing, and for other purposes

NOTE.-Sections amend other State Department or foreign relations legislation and are incorporated elsewhere in this volume.

Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled,

SHORT TITLE SECTION 1. This Act may be cited as the “Foreign Relations Authorization Act, Fiscal Year 1978”.

TITLE I-STATE DEPARTMENT

AUTHORIZATION OF APPROPRIATIONS SEC. 101. (a) There are authorized to be appropriated for the Department of State for fiscal year 1978, to carry out the authorities, functions, duties, and responsibilities in the conduct of the foreign affairs of the United States, including trade negotiations, and other purposes authorized by law, the following amounts:

(1) For the “Administration of Foreign Affairs”, $762,005,000.

(2) For "International Organizations and Conferences", $426,687,000.1

(3) For "International Commissions”, $21,839,000.
(4) For “Education Exchange", $94,600,000.
(5) For “Migration and Refugee Assistance”, $63,554,000.

(6) For increases in salary, pay, retirement, and other employee benefits authorized by law, and for other nondiscretionary costs, such amounts as may be necessary.

This authorization figure was substituted in lieu of the original authorization of $389,412,000 by sec. 102 of Public Law 95 426 (92 Stat. 963).

(b) Amounts appropriated under this section are authorized to remain available until expended.

TRANSFER AUTHORITY SEC. 102. Funds authorized to be appropriated for fiscal year 1978 by any paragraph of section 101(a) (other than paragraph (6)) may be appropriated for such fiscal year for a purpose for which appropriations are authorized by any other paragraph of such section (other than paragraph (6)), except that the total amount appropriated for a purpose described in any paragraph of section 101(a) (other than paragraph (6)) may not exceed the amount spe. cifically authorized for such purpose by section 101(a) by more than 10 per centum.

CONTRIBUTION TO THE WORLD HEALTH ORGANIZATION SEC. 103. Notwithstanding the limitation contained in the proviso in the paragraph under the subheading “Contributions to International Organizations” in title I of the Act of October 25, 1972 (86 Stat. 1110),2 $7,281,583 of the amount authorized to be appropriated by section 101(a)(2) of this Act may be used to pay the unpaid portion of the United States assessed contributions to the World Health Organization for the calendar years 1974 through 1977.

ASSISTANCE FOR REFUGEES SETTLING IN ISRAEL SEC. 104. Of the amount authorized to be appropriated by section 101(a)(5) of this Act, $20,000,000 shall be available only for assistance for the resettlement in Israel of refugees from the Union of Soviet Socialist Republics and from Communist countries in Eastern Europe.

Sec. 105.3 * * * (Repealed-1985)

STRENGTHENING EDUCATIONAL EXCHANGE PROGRAMS SEC. 107.4 The Congress finds that,

(1) for over thirty years the United States program for the international exchange of teachers and scholars, begun by the Act of August 1, 1946 (60 Stat. 754; known as the “Fulbright Act of 1946”), has contributed significantly to the free flow of knowledge and to greater understanding between the United States and other nations;

(2) it is in the interest of the United States that this program be strengthened; and

(3) a still stronger educational exchange program can be attained by

2 Such Act placed a 25 percent æiling on U.S. payments of assessed contributions to the United Nations or any alliliated agency. The amount authorized in this section was in excess of the 25 percent limit.

3 Sec. 105, relating to the U.S. contribution to the International Committee of the Red Cross, was repealed by sec. 109(d) of Public Law 99-93 (99 Stat 410).

* Sec. 505/a X3) of Public Law 97–241 (96 Stat. 299) repealed subsec. (b) of this section which had required a report from the Secretary of State on measures taken to strengthen educational exchange activities. The Secretary submilled this report on January 3, 1978.

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