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(e) Copies may be certified either by a certification on the document itself, or by a separate certification attached to the document. A certification on the document itself is placed at the end of the document. It indicates, either typed or stamped, that the document is a true copy of the original signed or initialed by (insert full name of signing officer), and it is signed by the certifying officer. If a certification is typed on a separate sheet of paper, it briefly describes the document certified and states that it is a true copy of the original signed by (full name) and it is signed by the certifying officer. $ 181.7 Transmittal to the Congress.

(a) International agreements other than treaties shall be transmitted by the Assistant Legal Adviser for Treaty Affairs to the President of the Senate and the Speaker of the House of Representatives as soon as practicable after the entry into force of such agreements, but in no event later than 60 days thereafter.

(b) Classified agreements shall be transmitted by the Assistant Secretary of State for Congressional Relations to the Senate Committee on Foreign Relations and to the House Committee on Foreign Affairs.

(c) The Assistant Legal Adviser for Treaty Affairs shall also transmit to the President of the Senate and to the Speaker of the House of Representatives background information to accompany each agreement reported under the Act. Background statements, while not expressly required by the Act, have been requested by the Congress and have become an integral part of the reporting requirement. Each background statement shall include information explaining the agreement, the negotiations, the effect of the agreement, and a precise citation of legal authority. At the request of the Assistant Legal Adviser for Treaty Affairs, each background statement is to be prepared in time for transmittal with the agreement it accompanies by the office most closely concerned with the agreement. Background statements for classified agreements are to be transmitted by the Assistant Secretary of State for Congressional Relations to the Senate Committee on Foreign Relations and to the House Committee on Foreign Affairs.

(d) Pursuant to Section 12 of the Taiwan Relations Act (22 U.S.C. 3311), any agreement entered into between the American Institute in Taiwan and the governing authorities on Taiwan, or any agreement entered into between the Institute and an agency of the United States Government, shall be transmitted by the Assistant Secretary of State for Congressional Relations to the President of the Senate and to the Speaker of the House of Representatives as soon as practicable after the entry into force of such agreements, but in no event later than 60 days thereafter. Classified agreements entered into by the Institute shall be transmitted by the Assistant Secretary for Congressional Relations to the Senate Committee on Foreign Affairs.2

In original. Should read Senate Committee on Foreign Relations.

(3) Delegating to the Secretary of State Certain Functions

With Respect to the Negotiation of International Agreements Relating to the Enhancement of the Environment Executive Order 11742; October 23, 1973; 38 F.R. 29467; 33 U.S.C. 1251 note

Under and by virtue of the authority vested in me by section 301 of title 3 of the United States Code and as President of the United States, I hereby authorize and empower the Secretary of State, in coordination with the Council on Environmental Quality, the Environmental Protection Agency, and other appropriate Federal agencies, to perform, without the approval, ratification, or other action of the President, the functions vested in the President by section 7 of the Federal Water Pollution Control Act Amendments of 1972 (Public Law 92-500; 86 Stat. 898) with respect to international agreements relating to the enhancement of the environment.

rons to performi, the functiontion Con

j. United States Institute of Peace Act

Partial text of Public Law 98-525 (Department of Defense Authorization

Act, 1986; HR. 6167), 98 Stat. 2492 at 2649, approved October 19, 1984; u amended by Public Law 99 498 (Higher Education Amendments of 1986, 8. 1966), 100 Stat. 1268, approved October 17, 1986; Public Law 100-50 (Higher Education Technical Amendments Act of 1987, H.R. 1846), 101 Stat. 335, approved June 3, 1987; Public Law 100569 (Library Services and Construction and United States Institute of Peace Reauthorization National Geography Studies Centers; H.R. 4416), 102 Stat. 2862, approved October 31, 1988; Public Law 101-520 (Legislative Branch Appropriations Act, 1991; HR. 6399), 104 Stat. 2254, approved November 8, 1990; and by Public Law 102-325, as amended (Higher Education Amendments of 1992, 8. 1160), 106 Stat. 448, approved July 23, 1992

AN ACT To authorize appropriations for fiscal year 1985 for the military functions

of the Department of Defense, to prescribe military personnel levels for that fiscal year for the Department of Defense, and for other purposes.

Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Representatives of the United States of America in Congress assembled,

SHORT TITLE: TABLE OF CONTENTS SECTION 1. (a) This Act may be cited as the “Department of Defense Authorization Act, 1985".

TITLE XVII—UNITED STATES INSTITUTE OF PEACE

SHORT TITLE Sec. 1701. This title may be cited as the “United States Institute of Peace Act".

DECLARATION OF FINDINGS AND PURPOSES Sec. 1702.1 (a) The Congress finds and declares that,

(1) a living institution embodying the heritage, ideals, and concerns of the American people for peace would be a significant response to the deep public need for the Nation to develop fully a range of effective options, in addition to armed capacity, that can leash international violence and manage international conflict;

(2) people throughout the world are fearful of nuclear war, are divided by war and threats of war, are experiencing social and cultural hostilities from rapid international change and real and perceived conflicts over interests, and are diverted from pence by the lack of problem-solving skills for dealing with such conflicts;

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(3) many potentially destructive conflicts among nations and people have been resolved constructively and with cost effi. ciency at the international, national, and community levels through proper use of such techniques as negotiation, conciliation, mediation, and arbitration;

(4) there is a national need to examine the disciplines in the social, behavioral, and physical sciences and the arts and humanities with regard to the history, nature, elements, and future of peace processes, and to bring together and develop new and tested techniques to promote peaceful economic, political, social, and cultural relations in the world;

(5) existing institutions providing programs in international affairs, diplomacy, conflict resolution, and peace studies are essential to further development of techniques to promote peaceful resolution of international conflict, and the peacemaking activities of people in such institutions, government, private enterprise, and voluntary associations can be strengthened by a national institution devoted to international peace research, education and training, and information services;

(6) there is a need for Federal leadership to expand and support the existing international peace and conflict resolution efforts of the Nation and to develop new comprehensive peace education and training programs, basic and applied research projects, and programs providing peace information;

(7) the Commission on Proposals for the National Academy of Peace and Conflict Resolution, created by the Education Amendments of 1978, recommended establishing an academy as a highly desirable investment to further the Nation's interest in promoting international peace;

(8) an institute strengthening and symbolizing the fruitful relation between the world of learning and the world of public affairs, would be the most efficient and immediate means for the Nation to enlarge its capacity to promote the peaceful resolution of international conflicts; and

(9) the establishment of such an institute is an appropriate investment by the people of this Nation to advance the history, science, art, and practice of international peace and the resolu

tion of conflicts among nations without the use of violence. (b) It is the purpose of this title to establish an independent, nonprofit, national institute to serve the people and the Government through the widest possible range of education and training, basic and applied research opportunities, and peace information services on the means to promote international peace and the resolution of conflicts among the nations and peoples of the world without recourse to violence.

DEFINITIONS
SEC. 1703.2 As used in this title, the term-

(1) “Institute” means the United States Institute of Peace established by this title; and

(2) “Board” means the Board of Directors of the Institute.

222 U.S.C. 4602.

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