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supported now under very trying and wearing sufferings (for he has been for some time confined to his bed) day and night, it would strengthen your faith ; for he is of a gentle, timid disposition, and did not use to seem able to beår suffering well., God displays the power of his grace in him now; and as his earthly comforts fail, his heavenly joys increase, and patience is given him. He had fallen down in a fit, and one of his feet was much burned in the fire. He was very much hurt on his hip, and has taken to his bed entirely--but can never lie down. He sits in a most painful position, with his head constantly bowed down, from the weakness of his back, which cannot support it, and he is bent like hálf á hoop, and cannot bear to be lifted up. It is very difficult to raise his head a little even to feed him.

Jan. 10, 1842.- Poor old Crook is kept in constant peace and patience by God. He seems to live in prayer, He has every comfort that can be done for him, from good farmer G. and ourselves. We take care, between us, to supply him with broth, wine, coffee, gruel, arrow root, coals, &c. and he has as much covering as he requires ; so that he is never, thank God, in want of any thing.

Jan. 24, 1842.—I was told by his granddaughter that he was not very sensible, and perhaps would not know me. However, when I went up, I found him in his usual position; and when I spoke to him, he knew me, and prayed God to bless me. He then repeated several of the prayers from the Liturgy successively, without stopping, and perfectly, and gave a very strong proof not only of his correct memory in such a state of age and dying weakness, '(mortification having commenced,) but also that he perfectly understood what he was saying, by altering the words to suit his own circumstances, as, for instance, in this prayer, “O Lord our heavenly Father, who hast safely brought us to this hour of the day,” &c., and "grant that this night we fall into no sin,” &c.—it being about six o'clock in the evening when I visited him. He continued praying thus, and as I found that he did not heed my presence, Í left him. The next day, when I called, he was very restless and uneasy, and seemed not well able to attend to any thing, but still resigned, and full of love to God. He said he was a poor old worn-out pilgrim; asked for a piece of baked apple, and, when it was brought, wished, rather, for a piece of cheese ; and, when that was brought, deșired an onion instead. Then he seemed to recollect himself, and grieved that he gave so much trouble.

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In another letter my sister writes

October 27th, 1841.- I have not much news. Our life is sq still.and regular, that the days, roll over our heads like the waves of the sea, sometimes without a ripple, sometimes more swollen, when like the disciples on the lake, while Jesus was sleeping, my heart begins to sink for want of a stronger faith; but his kind voice always seems to say so gently, "O thou of little faith, wherefore didst thou doubt?” What can we fear if Jesus be in the ship with us? and “he knoweth onr frames he remembereth that we are but dust.” Poor old Crook said to me the other day, “ Mr. B.,” the clergyman of the parish, " has read to me such a Psalm, the 118th. . Such comfortable words, they are enough to make a man beside himself. I have had much difficulty in thinking who the Holy Ghost is; but after praying to God to teach me, it is all made - plain to me; and since that my mind has been so opened to understand the Scriptures-every day I seem to see more in them. Once I used to take great pleasure in having a parcel of foolish books read to me, and I liked to hear them better than the Bible; but pow I can't bear them-I don't know how I feel when any one reads them. I feel terrible.. I hate the things I used to like so much. I laid awake last night, but I felt comfortable

. I was praying to God, and thinking of all my dear friends." Yesterday, in our walk to a village near this, I ran into bis cottage to leave him a piece of meat. I told him I could not stay to read to him, as we were going to walk, but that I wished God might be with him to comfort him. He said, Well, thank you! you will come another day, and I hope you will have a very happy walk.”

November 9.On my last visit to him-he said, “ We have all great duties to do. I hope God will help us to do them all before we die.. I said to him, "I hope you do not think that our salvation will depend upon our doing our duties?" "Ok, no!" he answered, " I know that very well; we can do nothing of ourselves; it is God who must work in all of us.” . He told me that he had been seeking God for twenty years, and that he was first brought to God by attending a chapel where there was a preacher who explained the Bible to him in very plain language, and then he said, "I have been afflicted with illness more or less these twenty years, so that I have had all that time to be thinking of God: and I do think of. him. When I was young-and well, I did not think of these things.".

Jan. 1, 1842.- If you could see how poor old Crook is supported now under very trying and wearing sufferings (for he has been for some time confined to his bed) day and night, it would strengthen your faith ; for he is of a gentle, timid disposition, and did not use to seem able to beår suffering well., God displays the power of his grace in him now; and as his earthly comforts fail, his heavenly joys increase, and patience is given him. He had fallen down in a fit, and one of his feet was much burned in the fire. He was very much hurt on bis hip, and has taken to his bed entirely—but can never lie down. He sits in a most painful position, with his head constantly bowed down, from the weakness of his back, which cannot support it, and he is bent like half a hoop, and cannot bear to be lifted up. It is very difficult to raise his head a little even to feed him.

Jan. 10, 1842.- Poor old Crook is kept in constant peace and patience by God. He seems to live in prayer. He has every comfort that can be done for him, from good farmer G. and ourselves. We take care, between us, to supply him with broth, wine, coffee, gruel, arrow root, coals, &c. and he has as much covering as he requires ; so that he is never, thank God, in want of any thing.

Jan. 24, 1842.— I was told by his granddaughter that he was not very sensible, and perhaps would not know me. However, when I went up, I found him in his usual position; and when I spoke to him, he knew me, and prayed God to bless me. He then repeated several of the prayers from the Liturgy successively, without stopping, and perfectly, and gave a very strong proof not only of his correct memory in such a state of age and dying weakness, (mortification having commenced,) but also that he perfectly understood what he was saying, by altering the words tņ suit his own circumstances, as, for instânce, in this prayer, “O Lord our heavenly Father, who hast safely brought us to this hour of the day,” &c., and “grant that this night we fall into no sin,” &c.—it being about six o'clock in the evening when I visited him. He continued praying thus, and as I found that he did not heed my presence, I left him. The next day, when I called, he was very restless and uneasy, and seemed not well able to attend to any thing, but still resigned, and full of love to God. He said he was á poor old worn-out pilgrim; asked for a piece of baked apple, and, when it was brought, wished, rather, for a piece of cheese; and, when that was brought, deşired an onion instead. Then he seemed to recollect himself, and grieved that he gave so much trouble.

The night before the one in which he died, his granddaughter told me his sufferings were very great, from his bruised hip; that he was groaning aloud with pain ; and that she and her husband were up with him all night. The next day he had ease, and remained all day in an insensible state; he appeared easy, but spoke not; and at one o'clock on the following night, or rather morning, his spirit fled-so quietly, that his granddaughter, who was supporting him, only knew it by perceiving that he had ceased to breathe-on the 25th of January, 1842.

This is a sweet simple account of a dear child of God, and it must give pleasure to his brothers and sisters in Christ to hear how mercifully and gently he was dealt with by his heavenly Father-living in a poor cottage, on an exposed common, on the skirts of the forest of Bere.

He was very poor, but he was waited upon by ministering angels, and the good Shepherd himself, The angels of the Lord encampeth round about them that fear him.”

Christians love one another : his fellow-Christians thought it a pleasure to administer to his wants.

The Saviour says, “Inasmuch as ye have done it unto one of the least of these my brethren, ye have done it unto me."

It is interesting to observe how God teaches his children by his Holy Spirit. This poor old man had received no educa. tion-he could not read-and yet see what a happy knowledge he had of his God! He was enabled to “rejoice in the Lord.” He loved the word of God, and was full of gratitude at hearing it read. It was the food for his soul. He fed upon the hidden manna. He could say, with the prophet, “ Thy words were found, and I did eat them; they were the joy and rejoicing of my heart.”

“ I love thy commandments above gold; yea, above fine gold.” (Ps. cxix. 127.)

In speaking of his Saviour, he said, “My Saviour is a precious Saviour to me."

"To you who believe he is precious."

When he heard the 118th Psalm read, he said, “ It was so comfortable !”

“I thought of thy wonders of old, and comforted myself."

When he got a taste for the word of God, he hated light and foolish books.

“ If any man be in Christ, he is a new creature; old things have passed away; behold all things are become new."

Observe, also, how the good Shepherd supported him through all his pains, and conducted him safely through the valley of the shadow of death.

This poor man cried, and the Lord heard him, and delivered him out of all his fears.” (Ps. xxxiv.)

Many are the afflictions of the righteous, but the Lord delivereth him out of them all.” (Ps. xxxiv. 19.)

“The Lord is my Shepherd; I shall not want. Yea, though I walk through the valley of the shadow of death, I will fear no evil; thy rod and thy staff they comfort me.” (Ps. xxiii, 1, 4.)

SABBATH MORNING MEDITATION. “My meditation of hin shall be sweet.”—Psalm civ. 34. It cannot be otherwise. In him all sweetness dwells, and as my soul goeth after him with the rising light of this morning, he will manifest himself to me more and more sweetly, so that I shall find it good to wait upon the Lord.

It was sweet last night to lie down “ on his breast” and wake this morning "in his arms” and feel that his smiles are the beams of this

sacred day, and these hours are the droppings from the wings of his love. Blessed be his holy name for this Sabbath, and to his service and his enjoyment shall it all be given.

It is sweet to think that God is love! That the Infinite God whose will holds worlds in being which his word created, comprehends the perfections of characters in that one word; a word that suits the lips of angels, and falls like the music of angels on the ear-God is love! It brings the great God so near to us, to hear him speaking of himself as Love, not lovely onlythat may be said of now and then one of his creatures—but he is Love. There is nothing lovely that has not something of him to make it so. He is the fountain; and purity, beauty, and bliss are in the streams.

It is sweet to think that He is the friend of those who trust in him: that we, who sometime were afar off, are now made nigh by the blood of the Cross, and that God is in Christ reconciling us unto himself. Thinking of our sins, and the stern justice of a holy God, we might tremble: but dwelling on the love of God in Christ, the precious plan of his own devising by which he can be just while he spares and saves, we rejoice with joy unspeakable, and with all the confidence

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