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as any other part of speech.” In parsing, a word is to be called a Word of Euphony, only when its chief office is Rhetorical.

QUESTIONS FOR REVIEW.
ADVERBS_PREPOSITIONS—CONJUNCTIONS-EXCLAMATIONS,
What is an Adverb ?
Why are they used ?
For what are they often substituted ?
Adverbs may consist of what?
What are the classes of Adverbs ?
Are Adverbs Modified? In what respect ?
When is an Adverb used only for Euphony?
What is a Preposition ?
What is the « Antecedent term of relation"?
The Antecedent may consist of what ?
Is it always expressed ? Examples ?
When is it not to be expressed ?
What is the “Consequent term of relation" }
The Consequent may consist of what ?
Is it always expressed ? Examples ?
When noi expressed, what offices does the Preposition perform ?
Is the Preposition always expressed ?
What is a Conjunction ?
What Conjunctions are used only to introduce Auxiliary Sentences ?
What is said of the Conjunctions nor, lest, f.c.?
What are double Conjunctions ?
What is an Exclamation ?
Exclamations may consist of what ?
Exclamations are followed by what?
What is a word of Euphony ?

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WORDS VARYING IN THEIR ETYMOLOGY. Rem.-Words are similar in Orthoëpy, when they are pronounced with the same sound of the same letter,

Examples— There, their; all, awl.

They are similar in Orthography, when they are formed by the same letters, similarly arranged.

EXAMPLES—Read, réad; extract, extract'.

They are similar in Elymology, when they perform a similar office in the construction of a phrase or sentence.

But it is plain that words similar in Orthoëpy differ in their Orthography--and words of similar Orthography perform widely different cffices in citerent connections,

7 Il should always be remembered by the scholar, that the OFFICE Q: a word not its shape-determines its Etymology.

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108

PART IJ.-ETYMOLOGY-EXERCISES.

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The Sentence which is Auxiliary to the Subject of the Prin. cipal Sentence is a Compound Mixed Sentence—its first Predi jate being Intransitive, the second Transitive.

The Teacher will find exercises of this sort beneficial chiefly to beginners, who may be associated with more advanced scholars.

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EXERCISES IN ETYMOLOGICAL ANALYSIS AND

PARSING.
Every motive therefore, of justice and of policy, of dignity
and prudence, urges you to allay the ferment in America, by a
removal of your troops from Boston; by a repeal of your Acts
of Parliament; and by a demonstration of amicable dispositions
towards your Colonies.”Pilt.

“From the shore,
Eat into caverns by the restless wave,
And forest-rustling mountains, comes voice,
That solemn sounding, bids the world prepare."

Thomson.
“There Joy gilds the mountains, all purple and bright;

And Peace, in the vales, rests in gentle repose ;
And Love, like a spirit of beauty and light,
Breathes sweetness abroad, on the air as it blows."

F. S. Jewelle.
“ There is a stern round tower of other days,
Firm as a fortress, with its fence of stone;
Such as an army's baffled strength delays,
Standing with half its battlements alone,
And with two thousand years of Ivy overgrown."-Byron

" Amidst the murmuring fountains

Of everlasting life,
Thy spirit like a bounding bark,

With song and gladness rife,
Goes gliding to the palmy shore,

That lies in sunny light before." —Hesperian.
- Let me hear thy voice awake, and bid her

Give me new and glorious hopes, like sunbeams,
Gleaming thro' the dark, but scattering clouds;
And strength of soul, to outbrave the thunder blast,
And like the eagle, suuward, mount, o'er rock,
And cloud, and storm, forever.”—F. S. Jewelle.

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as any other “part of speech.” In parsing, a word is to be called a Word of Euphony, only when its chief office is Rhetorival.

QUESTIONS FOR REVIEW.

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ADVERBS_PREPOSITIONS-CONJUNCTIONS-EXCLAMATIONS.
What is an Adverb ?
Why are they used ?
For what are they often substituted ?
Adverbs may consist of what?
What are the classes of Adverbs ?
Are Adverbs Modified ? In what respect ?
When is an Adverb used only for Euphony?
What is a Preposition ?
What is the “ Antecedent term of relation" ?
The Antecedent may consist of what?
Is it always expressed ? Examples ?
When is it not to be expressed ?
What is the “Consequent term of relation”?
The Consequent may consist of what ?
Is it always expressed ? Examples ?
When noi expressed, what offices does the Preposition perform ?
Is the Preposition always expressed ?
What is a Conjunction ?
What Conjunciions are used only to introduce Auxiliary Sentences ?
What is said of the Conjunctions nor, lest, f.c. ?
What are double Conjunctions ?
What is an Exclamation ?
Exclamations may consist of what ?
Exclamations are followed by what ?
What is a word of Euphony ?

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WORDS VARYING IN THEIR ETYMOLOGY. Rem.-Words are similar in Orthoëpy, when they are pronounced with ine same sound of the same letter.

EXAMPLES-There, their; all, awl.

They are similar in Orthography, when they are formed by the same letters, similarly arranged.

EXAMPLES-Réad, rčad ; car'lract, extract'.

They are similar in Elymology, when they perform a similar office in the construction of a phrase or sentence.

But it is plain that words similar in Orthoëpy differ in their Orthography- and words of similar Orthography perform widely different cffices in datterent connections.

Il should always be remembered by the scholar, that the OFFICE I a word -not its shapedetermines its Etymology.

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108

PART II ETYMOLOGY-EXERCISES.

P.LON Dis

The Sentence which is Auxiliary to the Subject of the Prin. cipal Sentence is a Compound Mixed Sentence—its first Predi ate being Intransitive, the second Transitive.

17 The Teacher will find exercises of this sort beneficial chiefly to beginners, who may be associated with more advanced scholars.

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EXERCISES IN ETYMOLOGICAL ANALYSIS AND

PARSING.
“Every motive therefore, of justice and of policy, of dignity
and prudence, urges you to allay the ferment in America, by a
removal of your troops from Boston; by a repeal of your Acts
of Parliament; and by a demonstration of amicable dispositions
towards your Colonies.”Pilt.

“ From the shore,
Eat into caverns by the restless wave,
And forest-rustling mountains, comes a voice,
That solemn sounding, bids the world prepare.

Thomson.
“There Joy gilds the mountains, all purple and bright;

And Peace, in the vales, rests in gentle repose ;
And Love, like a spirit of beauty and light.
Breathes sweetness abroad, on the air as it blows."

F. S. Jewelle.
“ There is a stern round tower of other days,

Firm as a fortress, with its fence of stone;
Such as an army's baffled strength delays,
Standing with half its battlements alone,
And with two thousand years of Ivy overgrown.”Byron

"Amidst the murmuring fountains

Of everlasting life,
Thy spirit like a bounding bark,

With song and gladness rife,
Goes gliding to the palmy shore,

That lies in sunny light before.”Hesperian. - Let me hear thy voice awake, and bid her

Give me new and glorious hopes, like sunbeams,
Gleaming thro' the dark, but scattering clouds;
And strength of soul, to outbrave the thunder blast,
And like the eagle, sunward, mount, o'er rock,
And cloud, and storm, forever."-F. S. Jewelle.

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$

DIAGRAMS-THEIROFFICES.

107

. « The office of a word in a Sentence determines its place in the Diagram.” Then

Prin.

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Obs.-When a Sentence is properly placed in Diagram, the young pupil can easily determine the office, (and consequently the class) of each word, and its most important modifications. Thus in the Diagram above, 1 and 25 occupy the place of Nouns or Pronouns, which must be in the Nominative Case.

2, 7, 11, and 26, are Verbs—2, 11, and 26, are Transitive7 is Intransitive.

3 and 12 are Nouns or Pronouns, and must be in the Objective Case.

22 and 16 may be Nouns, Pronouns, or Infinitive Verbs, and are Objects of Prepositions.

4, 5, 13, 14, 20, are Adjectives. 8, 9, are Adverbs.

17, 18, 19, 23, 24, are Adjectives--if 22, 16, are Nouns or Pronouns. They are Adverbs—if 22, 16, are Infinitive Verbs.

6 and x are Relative Pronouns-6 is in the Nominative Case---x is in the Objective Case.

6 to 19, inclusive, constitute an Adjective Sentence, which describes (1.)

(25, 26, x,) constitute an Adjective Sentence, which describes (22.)

(21, 22, 23, 24,) and (15, 16, 17, 18, 19,) constitute Phrasesand, because they are attached to 3 and 12, they are Adjectives. 21 and 15 are Prepositions

0 and 10 are Conjunctions—0 introduces a Sentence-10 connects two words.

The Sentence to which this Diagram is applicable is Complex, The Principal Sentence is Simple-Transitive—the Subject of which is qualified by two Words and one Sentence—the Object is qualified by one Word and one Phrase.

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