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TROCHAIC VERSE.

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1. Hexameter, or six feet. « On a | mountain | stretched beneath a | hoary) wil.com, Lay a shepherd swain and viewed the rolling billow.”

2. Pentameter or five feet.
“ Rouse him I like a / rattling | peal of thunder.”

3. Tetrameter or four feet.
On the mountain's | top ap | rearing,
Lo, the sacred herald stands!

4. Three feet.
Come and I join our | singing."
“How I | love to see thee,
Golden evening sun."

5. Two feet.
Rich the treasure,
Sweet the pleasure.
6. One foot.

Ringing,
Singing.

IAMBIC VERSE.

nal morn,

1. Six feet. The praise I of Bac, chus then I the sweel | musician sung

2. Five feet.
Oh, 1 | have loved ( in youth's / fair ver
To spread | ima I gina | tion's wild ! est wing.

3. Four feet.
There is , a calm | for those / who weep,
A rest | for wea | ry pil | grims found.

4. Three feet.
What sought they thus | afar ?
Bright jew | els of the mine?

5. Two feet.
“I am | the grave."

6. One foot.
"My home.”

ANAPASSIC VERSE.

1. Four feet.
But we stead I fastly gazed | on the face 1 of the dead.

2. Three feet.
“And I loved | her the more | when I heard
Such tenderness fall from her tongue.”

3. Two feet.
“For thě night | only draws

A thin veil o'er the day.”

DACTYLIC VERSE.

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1. Four feet. Come, ye dis | consolate, / where'er ye 'languish.

2. Three feet.
Earth has no / sorrows that | Heaven cannot | heal.

3. Two feet.
Free from anx ' iety,
Care and satiety.

4. One foot.
Chëērfülly,
Fearfully.

THE AMPHIBRACH.

There is a | bleak desert | where daylight | grows weary

Of wasting its smile on a region so dreary."
" With storm-dar, ing pinion | and sun-ga | zing eye,

The gray forest eagle is king of the sky.”
“There's preasure | in ireedom | whatever | the season,
That makes every object look 'lovely and fair."

REMARKS.

The first syllable of a verse is sometimes omitted.

EXAMPLE

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17" And there | lay the ri | der, distorted and pale,

With the dew on his brow | and the rust I on his mail." 2. A syllable is sometimes added to a line.

EXAMPLES.
Earth has no | sorrows that I heaven cannot real

||

"
A guar | dian an ge! o'er / my life | presid | ing,
Doubling my pleasures and my cares dividing.

3. The different measures are sometimes coinlined in the same line.

EXAMPLES

“May comes, | May comes, I we have called | her .ong,
May comes 1 'o'er the moun | tains with light | and song;
We may trace | her steps | o'er the wak | ening earth,

By the winds / which tell | of the vio | let's birth.” Sometimes the last syllable of a line becomes the first syllable in the first foot of the next.

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EXAMPLE.

“On the cold | cheek of death | smiles and ro | ses are blend | ing, And beau / ty immor | tal awakes , from the tomb."

FIGURES. A Figure of speech is a licensed departure from the ordinary structure, or use of a word in a sentence.

Grammatical or Figures are

Rhetorical. A Grammatical Figure is a deviation from the ordinary form or office of a word in a sentence.

A Rhetorical Figure is a deviation from the crdinary application of words in the expression of thought.

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FIGURES MODIFYING THE FORM OF WORDS.
These are called
Aphæresis,

Synæresis,
Apocope,

Diæresis,
Prosthesis,

Syncope,
Paragoge,

Tmesis. 1. Aphæresis allows the elision of one or more of the first letters of a word.

EXAMPLES.

"Mid scenes of confusion.”
“And therefore thou may'st think my 'haviour light.”—Juliet.

“What! have you let the false enchanter 'scape ?"-Milton. 2. Apocope allows the elision of one or more of the final letters of a word.

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EXAMPLES.

“And that is spoke.. with such a dying fall."
" Tho' the whole loosened Spring around her blows"

“ T' whom th' archangel.”-Millon.

3. Paragoge allows a syllable to be annexed to a word.

EXAMPLES.

• Withouten trump was proclamation made.”—Thompson.

“ Nor deem that kindly nature did him wrong."Bryant. 4. Synæresis allows two syllables to become one. EXAMPLE-Extra session-ordinary session-extraordinary sessica, 5. Prosthesis allows a syllable to be prefixed to a word

EXAMPLES,

" Else would à maiden blush bepaint my cheek.”—Juliet.
“Let fall adown his silver beard some tears."— Thomson.

“ The great archangel from his warlike toil

Surceased.”—Milton. 6. Diæresis separates two vowels into different syllables. EXAMPLES—Coöperate-reïterate.

7. Syncope allows one or more letters to be taken from the middle of a word.

EXAMPLES.

11. Or serve they as a flow'ry verge to bind,

The fluid skirts of that same wat’ry cloud,

Lest it again dissolve and show'r the earth.”—Milton. 8. Tmesis allows a word to be inserted between the parts of a compound word.

EXAMPLE-" HOW MUCH soever we may desire it."
Obs.-Sometimes two figures are combined in the same word.
EXAMPLE="Ah, whence is that sound which now larums his ear?"

II.

Pleonasm,

FIGURES MODIFYING THE OFFICE OF WORDS.
These are called
Ellipsis,

Syllipsis,

Enallage,

Hyperbaton. 1. Ellipsis allows the omission of one or more words necessary to complete the grammatical construction, when custom has rendered them unnecessary to complete the sense.

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2. Pleonasm allows the introduction of words not necessary to complete the grammatical construction of a sentence. EXAMPLE—"The moon herself is lost in heaven.” 3. Syllipsis allows a word to be used not in its literal sense. EXAMPLE_" And there lay the steer with his nostril all wide.”

4. Enallage allows the use of one word for another of similar origin.

EXAMPLE_" A world devote to universal wreck."
5. Hyperbaton allows the transposition of words in a sentence.
ExamPLE—His voice SUBLIME, is heard afar."

FIGURES OF RHETORIC.
They are
Simile,

Synecdoche,
Metaphor,

Apostrophe,
Allegory,

Interrogation,
Personation,

Exclamation,
Irony,

Vision,
Hyperbole,

Paralepsis,
Antithesis,

Climax,
Metonomy,

Anti-climax,

Alliteration.
1. A Simile is a direct comparison.
EXAMPLE_" The Assyrian came down like the wolf on the fold."
2. A Metaphor is an indirect comparison.
EXAMPLE— There is a tide in the affairs of men,

Which, taken at the flood, leads on to fortune." 3. An Allegory is an extended metaphor, by which a narration, real or fictitious, is made to convey an analogous truth or fiction. Example—“Eternity's vast ocean lies before thee,

There, there, Lorenzo, thy Clarissa sails,
Give thy mind sea-room; keep it wide of Earth-
That rock of souls immortal; cut thy cord;
Weigh anchor; spread thy sails; call every wind;

Eye ihy great Pole-star; make the land of life."— Young. 4. Personation represents inanimate things as being endowed with life and volition. EXAMPLES— And old Experience learns too late,

That all is vanity below."
Joy has her tears, and Transporl has her death.”

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