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.... not

Out.........

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Re....

..make.

....

Non..
.. not

..nonconformable. Ne

..never. Ob

object. Oc .... against

occur. Op

oppose. ..beyond

..outrun. Over.... ..above

..overlay. Poly. ..many

polysyllable. Pen... .almost

. penumbra. Per .... through

- pervade. Post .after

postscript. Pre.. .before

.predict. Pro... .forth..

produce.

..refine. Se ..from.

..select. Syl

syllogism. Sym .... with

symphony Syn

synchronisin. Sub

subscribe. Suc

succumb. Suf

suffix. Sup

support. Sus

sustain. Super

.superintend. Trans. .beyond

.transfer. Un.

. unknown. Unde under.

.underwrite. Up .......up

. uphold. With .against...

withstand Rem.-The above constitute the most important Prefixes and the most common definitions. But to them there are many exceptions-exceptions almost as important as the rules. If the student would perfect himself in this department of the science, he may consult “McElLigot's MANUAL OF ORTHOGRAPHY AND DEFINITION.”

Rem.--For an extended list of Suffixes the same reference is made.

....... under.

..over

... not

NOTE C. Most nouns adopted from the Latin, Greek, French, and Hebrew languages, have their plural forms also in those languages. Those most commonly used in English composition are the following: Latin or Greek words form their Plurals by changing the termination 18

into E s. Amanuensis, amanuenses. Axis,

axes, Antithesis, antitheses.

Basis,

bases. Analysis, analyses.

Borealis, boreales,

Crisis, crises.

Oasis,

oases. Ellipsis, ellipses.

Parenthesis,

parentheses Emphasis, emphases.

Phasis,

phases. Hypothesis, hypotheses. Thesis,

theses. Metamorphosis, metamorphoses.

The following change is into de 8:
Ephemeris, ephemerides. Chrysalis, chrysalides

The following change x into ces:
Apex,
apices.

Index,

indices. apexes.

indexes. appendices. Radix, Appendix,

radices. appendixes.

Vertex,

vertices. Calx, calces.

vertexes. calxes.

Vortex,

vortices. Nouns in us have their Plurals in l. Alumnus, alumni.

Magus,

magi. Focus, foci.

Nucleus,

nuclei. fungi. Fungus,

Obolus,

oboli. funguses.

Radius,

radii. Genius. genii.

Stimulus, stimuli. geniuses.

Nouns in on and om have their Plurals in A. Addendum, addenda.

gymnasia.

Gymnasium, Animalculum, animalcula.

gymnasiums. Arcanum,

Medium,

media, Automaton. automata,

mediums, criteria. Criterion,

Memorandum,

memoranda, criterions.

memoranduma Corrigendum, corrigenda.

Momentum,

momenta. Datum, data.

momentums. Desideratum, desiderata.

Phenomenon,

phenomena. Effluvium, efiluvia. encomia,

Scholium,

scholia,

scholiums. Encomium,

encomiums. Speculum, specula. Erratum, errata.

Stratum,

strata, Ephemeron, ephemera.

The following Nouns are thus formed:
banditti.

Lamina,

larninæ. Bandit, bandits.

Larva,

larvæ. Beau, beaux,

Miasma, miasmata. cherubim

Monsieur, messieurs, Cherut, cherubs.

Nebula,

nebulæ. dogmata. Dogma,

seraphim.

Seraph, dogmas.

seraphs. formulæ.

Stamina. Formula, formulas.

Stamen,

stamens. Genus, genera.

Viscus,

viscera.

arcana.

NOTE D. For expositions of the various offices of Participles, the student is referred to

“ Verbal Nouns," p. 44.
“ Verbal Adjectives," pp. 62, 63, and 164, 165.
"Participles," pp. 71, 72, and 125-128.
“Exercises," pp. 75, 76, and 133, 134.
6.Twofold office of some words," p. 105.

NOTE E.

For illustrations of the office of Nouns and Pronouns in the Possessive Case the student is referred to

Possessive Case of Nouns and Pronouns,” pp. 49, 50, and 142, 143.

"Possessive Adjectives," pp. 61, and 163, 164. “ Twofold office of some words," p. 100, and p. 118 Rem. 2.

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ACCORDING TO THEIR GRAMMATICAL STRUCTURE

BY S. W. CLARK, A. M.

Price 87} cents.

II.

A PRACTICAL GRAMMAR,

IN WHICH

WORDS, PHRASES, AND SENTENCES, ARE CLASSIFIED

ACCORDING TO THEIR OFFICES

AND THEIR RELATION TO EACH OTHER. ILLUSTRATED BY A COMPLETE SYSTEM OF DIAGRAMS.

BY S. W. CLARK, A. M

Price 50 cents.

III.

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THE ANALYSIS OF SENTENCES, THE ANALYSIS OF PHRASES

AND CLASSIFICATION AND MODIFICATION OF WORDS.

BY S. W. CLARK, A. M.

Mounted. Price $2.50.

PUBLISHED BY

A. S. BARNES & CO.,

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CLARK'S NEW ENGLISH GRAMMAR. A Practical Grammar, in which WORDS, PHRASES, and SENTENCES are claimed Rod, according to their offices, and their relation to each other : illustrated by a complete system of Diagrams. By S. W. CLARK, A. M. Price 50 cto.

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