Henry, Volym 2

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Sida 114 - tis not so deep as a well, nor so wide as a church door ; but 'tis enough, 'twill serve : ask for me to-morrow, and you shall find me a grave man. I am peppered, I warrant, for this world. A plague o...
Sida 113 - My son, if sinners entice thee, consent thou not. If they say, Come with us, let us lay wait for blood, let us...
Sida 216 - ... story within story should be avoided; the adventures of the Man of the Hill, in The Foundling is an excrescence that offends against the grace and symmetry of the plot: whatever makes a pause in the main business, and keeps the chief characters too long out of sight, must be a defect.
Sida 113 - So are the ways of every one that is greedy of gain; which taketh away the life of the owners thereof.
Sida 7 - ... for of these every man is a critic: Nature is in the first place to be attended to, and probability is not to be lost sight of; but it must be nature strongly featured, and probability closely bordering on the marvellous; the one must touch upon extravagance, and the other be highly seasoned with adventures — for who will thank us for a dull and lifeless journal of insipid facts? Now every peculiarity of humour in the human character is a strain upon nature, and every surprising incident is...
Sida 5 - ... spirit of satire, that in my opinion neither adds to their merit nor our amusement. A pedant, who secludes himself from society, may nourish a cynical humour ; but a writer who gives the living manners of the age, is supposed to live amongst men, and write from the crowd rather than the closet ; now if such a man runs about from place to place with no cleanlier purpose than to search for filth and ordure, I conceive his office to be that of a scavenger rather than a scholar. An honest man, as...
Sida 210 - ... constitution of my country in the same breath, nor even (Heaven be thanked!) to overturn it, though that might be the easier task of the two, or, more properly speaking, one and the same thing in its consequences. Nature is my guide; man's nature, not his natural rights: the one ushers me by the straightest avenue to the human heart, the other bewilders me in a maze of metaphysics.
Sida 4 - I do not aim to draw a perfect character, for after a pretty long acquaintance with mankind I have never met with any one example of the sort: How then shall I describe what I have not seen? On the contrary, if I wish to form a character, like this of Henry, in which virtue predominates, or like that of Blackford, where the opposite 1 His vices are not allayed with a single virtue.
Sida 7 - To represent scenes of familiar life in an elegant and interesting manner, is one of the most difficult tasks an author can take in hand ; for of these every man is a critic : Nature is in the first place to be attended to, and probability is not to be lost sight of ; but it must be nature strongly featured, and probability closely bordering on the marvellous ; the one must touch upon extravagance, and the other be highly seasoned with adventures — for who will thank us for a dull and lifeless...
Sida 213 - I had in hand, and by considering how that stock was adapted to the different tastes and pursuits of the times ; in doing this I was obliged to be pretty well informed of the state of politics in Europe, as I have always found that bookselling is much affected by the political state of affairs. For as mankind are in search of amusement, they often embrace the first that offers ; so that if there is anything in the newspapers of consequence, that draws many to the coffee-house, where they chat away...

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