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WAGE WORKERS.

The table illustrating the average daily and weekly wages received by employes in the most common of the industrial occupations is made up from returns made to this Bureau by individual employes, a sufficient number of returns from each occupation being used to make a fair average. A noticeably different average is arrived at from returns made by employers, which is presumably explained on the theory that employes usually give the lowest figures, while the employer generally gives the highest, the tendeney on the one part being to make it appear that their condition is worse than it really is, and on the other part to make it appear that the laborer is better off than he really is.

GENERAL STATISTICAL TABLE,

SHOWING AVERAGE WAGES PER DAY OR PER WEEK, AND THE AV

ERAGE NUMBER OF HOURS CONSTITUTING A DAY'S LABOR IN
FORTY-EIGHT DIFFERENT EMPLOYMENTS.

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10

10

10

10

10

92 This table represents about 100 firms

and 900 printers, union and non-union.

10

10 Employed about i time.

10

Plumber.

15 00

Polisher.

1 801

Porter.

10 00

Paper box maker.....

19 00

Pork packer.

2 00

Printer.

2 25

Painter-house

2 50

Painter-carriage....

12 00

Quarryman

1 90

Screw cutter.

1 25

10

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Notes.—There are about 700 bricklayers in the city of St. Louis, not including 350 apprentices. On account of the nature of the occupation they find employment only about 200 days in the year.

The average weekly wages of cigarmakers in Kansas City is $11.50, and in St. Louis, $10.

Glass bottle blowers usually are without work for the months of July and August. It is claimed that the importation of German bottles seriously interferes with that industry in St. Louis, and limits the demands for and the wages of labor.

Boys from ten to seventeen years of age are being largely employed in house painting, thereby cheapening wages.

In the brush making industry boys are generally taking the places of men ; while complaint is made that in St. Louis the women in the work house are hired at twenty-five cents a day by manufacturers.

Quarrymen rarely find employment for more than eight months in the year on account of rain and frost.

Emery dust seriously affects the health of stove mounters, frequently resulting in pulmonary consumption.

Boys are largely employed in carriage painting.

In horse collar making employes complain that they are brought in direct competition with convict labor to their detriment.

The stocking knitters in St. Louis very generally complain of poor pay, overwork, and frequently of harsh treatment.

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