Shakespeare's Tragedy of Macbeth: With Introduction, and Notes Explanatory and Critical. For Use in Schools and Classes

Framsida
Ginn & Heath, 1879 - 203 sidor
 

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Sida 143 - Hell is murky ! — Fie, my lord, fie ! a soldier, and afeard ? What need we fear who knows it, when none can call our power to account? — Yet who would have thought the old man to have had so much blood in him ? Doct. Do you mark that ? Lady M. The thane of Fife had a wife ; where is she now° ? — What, will these hands ne'er be clean ? — No more o' that, my lord, no mor.e o' that : you mar all with this starting.
Sida 57 - Are ye fantastical, or that indeed Which outwardly ye show? My noble partner You greet with present grace, and great prediction Of noble having, and of royal hope, That he seems rapt withal; to me you speak not: If you can look into the seeds of time, And say, which grain will grow, and which will not, Speak then to me, who neither beg, nor fear, Your favours, nor your hate.
Sida 84 - God bless us!' and 'Amen' the other ; As they had seen me with these hangman's hands. Listening their fear, I could not say ' Amen,' When they did say ' God bless us !
Sida 82 - I go, and it is done ; the bell invites me. Hear it not, Duncan ; for it is a knell That summons thee to heaven or to hell.
Sida 164 - That palter with us in a double sense, That keep the word of promise to our ear, And break it to our hope. I'll not fight with thee. Macd. Then yield thee, coward, And live to be the show and gaze o
Sida 73 - tis done, then 'twere well It were done quickly; if the assassination Could trammel up the consequence, and catch With his surcease success : that but this blow Might be the be-all and the end-all here, But here, upon this bank and shoal of time, We'd jump the life to come.
Sida 191 - Merciful heaven ! — What, man ! ne'er pull your hat upon your brows; Give sorrow words : the grief that does not speak Whispers the o'erfraught heart, and bids it break.
Sida 75 - Was the hope drunk, Wherein you dress'd yourself ? hath it slept since, And wakes it now, to look so green and pale At what it did so freely ? From this time Such I account thy love. Art thou afeard To be the same in thine own act and valour As thou art in desire ? Wouldst thou have that Which thou esteem'st the ornament of life, And live a coward in thine own esteem, Letting " I dare not" wait upon " I would," Like the poor cat i
Sida 84 - Who was it that thus cried ? Why, worthy thane, You do unbend your noble strength, to think So brainsickly of things : — Go, get some water, And wash this filthy witness from your hand. — Why did you bring these daggers from -the place ? They must lie there : go carry them ; and smear The sleepy grooms with blood. Macb. . I'll go no more : I am afraid to think what I have done ; Look on't again, I dare not.
Sida 84 - Methought I heard a voice cry " Sleep no more ! Macbeth does murder sleep," the innocent sleep, Sleep that knits up the ravell'd sleave of care, The death of each day's life, sore labour's bath, Balm of hurt minds, great nature's second course, Chief nourisher in life's feast, — Lady M. What do you mean ? Macb. Still it cried "Sleep no more!" to all the house: "Glamis hath murder'd sleep, and therefore Cawdor Shall sleep no more ; Macbeth shall sleep no more !

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