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set of executive officers to whose hands the management of our concerns could be entrusted with entire confidence. The result is before the public. The society has prospered, during the two years of its location at Hartford, beyond all former experience; and its friends owe a tribute of respect and gratitude, not only to their departed fellow-laborer, but to the gentlemen associated with bim in the supervision of its affairs, one of whom, the Rev. Gustavus F. Davis, D. D., late pastor of the First Baptist Church in Hartford, has also gone to receive from the God of peace the rewards promised to the peacemaker.

We trust, however, that the cause will lose nothing by the society's removal to Boston. It is obviously the best place for the seat of our operations that can be found in America. The focus of business, intelligence and religious influence to all that section of our country where the deepest interest has been taken in this cause, the metropolis of New England offers very peculiar facilities for the prosecution of our enterprise. It is a sort of moral observatory and light-house to the nation ; and froin its past services in the cause of liberty, benevolence and reform, we may confidently expect much aid in the great work of universal and permanent peace. This resting-place of the Pilgrims was the cradle of foreign missions, the temperance reform, and many other enterprises that are now rallying the wise and the good in all parts of our country, and blessing the nation and the world. Here was blown in 1814 the first blast that roused the friends of peace in our own and other lands, to the claims of this long-neglected cause; and the venerable man who blew those angel-notes of universal peace and love, still lingers among us to rejoice in the progress and brightening prospects of an enterprise to which be devoted the best energies of his life. We trust that the mantle of Elijah has fallen upon more than one Elisha ; and from the tried and able friends of our cause, clustered in larger numbers around this city than any other place in America, we expect such aid in the publication of our periodical, and such support in our general operations, as will more than justify the society's removal.

II. PERIODICAL OF THE SOCIETY.

This work, conducted hitherto with such ability as to command a high degree of respect on both sides of the Atlantic, must of course pass into other hands. Whether it will continue to deserve the reputation it has won, it is not for us to predict; but, with the aid of former contributors to its pages, and additional assistance from men of learning, taste and talent in this region pledged to our cause, we shall hope to render it even more useful to common, and not less interesting to cultivated minds.

We contemplate no special change in the work, except in making it more strictly the organ of our society, and a more faithful chronicler of efforts in our cause through the world. We shall aim to keep our readers informed, not only of what is thought on the subject of peace, but of what is done for the spread of its principles; and, for this purpose, we shall occasionally quote from contemporary journals and other works, enough to mark the favorable change which we believe to be silently, yet steadily going on in the public mind beyond the sphere of efforts made by the plighted friends of this enterprise. The work, however, will retain the same general features, and be devoted still to the discussion of important topics connected with our cause, to brief notices of current publications involving more or less of our principles, and to general intelligence concerning the civil and political affairs of the world.

Our principles are known; and for the defence and propagation of these principles, we shall plant ourselves upon the word of God, and call upon the community to look at the subject in the light which beams from his throne. We believe the time has fully come for a direct, earnest, decisive appeal " to the law and to the testimony ;” and to this test we would bring the great questions involved in our cause, and keep the public mind grappled to the subject until its main points are all settled in accordance with the Christian's only standard of truth and duty

It must come to this; and the sooner, the better. Here is the hinge of the whole subject. It is with us a question not

set of executive officers to whose hands the management of our concerns could be entrusted with entire confidence. The result is before the public. The society has prospered, during the two years of its location at Hartford, beyond all former experience; and its friends owe a tribute of respect and gratitude, not only to their departed fellow-laborer, but to the gentlemen associated with him in the supervision of its affairs, one of whom, the Rev. Gustavus F. Davis, D. D., late pastor of the First Baptist Church in Hartford, has also gone to receive from the God of peace the rewards promised to the peacemaker.

We trust, however, that the cause will lose nothing by the society's removal to Boston. It is obviously the best place for the seat of our operations that can be found in America. The focus of business, intelligence and religious influence to all that section of our country where the deepest interest bas been taken in this cause, the metropolis of New England offers very peculiar facilities for the prosecution of our enterprise. It is a sort of moral observatory and light-house to the nation ; and froin its past services in the cause of liberty, benevolence and reform, we may confidently expect much aid in the great work of universal and permanent peace. This resting-place of the Pilgrims was the cradle of foreign missions, the temperance reform, and many other enterprises that are now rallying the wise and the good in all parts of our country, and blessing the nation and the world. Here was blown in 1814 the first blast that roused the friends of peace in our own and other lands, to the claims of this long-neglected cause; and the venerable man who blew those angel-notes of universal peace and love, still lingers among us to rejoice in the proge ress and brightening prospects of an enterprise to which he devoted the best energies of his life. We trust that the mantle of Elijah has fallen upon more than one Elisha ; and from the tried and able friends of our cause, clustered in larger numbers around this city than any other place in America, we expect such aid in the publication of our periodical, and such support in our general operations, as will more than justify the society's removal.

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This work, conducted hitherto with such ability as to command a high degree of respect on both sides of the Atlantic, must of course pass into other hands. Whether it will continue to deserve the reputation it has won, it is not for us to predict; but, with the aid of former contributors to its pages, and additional assistance from men of learning, taste and talent in this region pledged to our cause, we shall hope to render it even more useful to common, and not less interesting to cultivated minds.

We contemplate no special change in the work, except in making it more strictly the organ of our society, and a more faithful chronicler of efforts in our cause through the world. We shall aim to keep our readers informed, not only of what is thought on the subject of peace, but of what is done for the spread of its principles; and, for this purpose, we shall occasionally quote from contemporary journals and other works, enough to mark the favorable change which we believe to be silently, yet steadily going on in the public mind beyond the sphere of efforts made by the plighted friends of this enterprise. The work, however, will retain the same general features, and be devoted still to the discussion of important topics connected with our cause, to brief notices of current publications involving more or less of our principles, and to general intelligence concerning the civil and political affairs of the world.

Our principles are known; and for the defence and propagation of these principles, we shall plant ourselves upon the word of God, and call upon the community to look at the subject in the light which beams from his throne. We believe the time has fully come for a direct, earnest, decisive appeal “to the law and to the testimony ;” and to this test we would bring the great questions involved in our cause, and keep the public mind grappled to the subject until its main points are all settled in accordance with the Christian's only standard of truth and duty.

It must come to this; and the sooner, the better. Here is the hinge of the whole subject. It is with us a question not

cause.

so much of policy as of conscience. It is a branch of our religion. It belongs to the higher ethics of Christianity. The argument from expediency is very strong; but the argument from Christian duty is irresistible. Here is the pivot of this

If peace be not an enterprise strictly evangelical, its principles a part of the gospel, its duties an element of our religion, essential to the full and perfect development of Christian character, we are prepared to abandon it forthwith for work more appropriate to our high and holy calling; but, if it is, then must we insist upon restoring this long lost pleiad to the primitive constellation of Christian graces, and press upon every follower of Christ the obligation of cultivating this grace, and laboring to render peace, just as he does repentance and faith, co-extensive with the prevalence of Christianity itself. We shall not overlook other views of this subject; but whatever rays of light may come from reason or history, we would concentrate in this grand focus of our cause. We wish to look at war as the apostles did, as Jesus Christ himself did, as a God of infinite purity and love still regards it. We would hold it up before the mirror of the gospel, and reflect upon the whole community a just and startling image of its guilt as a mass of abominations in the sight of God. If he has legalized, in any case, its arts and intrigues, its falsehoods and deceptions, its pollutions and cruelties, its atrocities and horrors, its ferocious outrages upon the dearest rights and interests of mankind, its reckless trampling on all the laws of earth and heaven, its glaring contradictions of the spirit and precepts of the New Testament, we will relinquish our ground; but, if not, we shall call upon the Christian, as he reveres God, or loves man, to rally beneath the stainless banners of peace, and take his stand upon the everlasting gospel against this legalized system of vice, and crime, and wholesale mischief.

We design to pursue a liberal course. On all the points of this great subject, we shall open our pages to a fair and full exhibition of both sides ; and, wbile devoting our chief attention to those principles which we believe to be taught in the gospel, we shall dwell, as much as our limits will allow, upon topics like the following:

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