Hunting Sports in the West: Comprising Adventures of the Most Celebrated Hunters and Trappers

Framsida
Potter, 1859 - 320 sidor
Collection of published stories of famous adventurers, including Davy Crockett, Frederick Gerstaecker, John J. Audubon, Kendall, Merrit, Pike, etc. Most of the tales are from accounts by Audubon and Gerstaeker.
 

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Sida 318 - We got there just before dark, and struck up a fire, and commenced butchering my bear. It was some time in the night before we finished it : and I can assert, on my honor, that I believe he would have weighed six hundred pounds.
Sida 256 - The deer is heard coming. It has inadvertently cracked a dead stick with its hoof, and the dogs are now so near it that it will pass in a moment. There it comes! How beautifully it bounds over the ground! What a splendid head of horns! How easy its attitudes, depending, as it seems to do, on its own swiftness for safety! All is in vain, however: a gun is fired, the animal plunges and doubles with incomparable speed. There he goes! He passes another stand, from which a second shot, better directed...
Sida 238 - ... it. Each hunter now moved with caution, holding his gun ready, and allowing the bridle to dangle on the neck of his horse, as it advanced slowly towards the dogs. A shot from one of the party was heard, on which the cougar was seen to leap to the ground, and bound off with such velocity as to show that he was very unwilling to stand our fire longer.
Sida 156 - ... feet long, with four openings. After having well fortified the inner man, we prepared to enter the cave. We took only one rifle with us, but each had his large hunting-knife, and I buckled my powder-horn close to my side ; then with my rifle in my right hand, and a torch of at least twenty inches in my left, we entered a dark passage about four feet high and two feet wide ; young Conwell came next to me with another torch, followed by his father with a bundle of splinters to replace the torches...
Sida 252 - We arrive at the spot where the animal had laid itself down among the grass -in a thicket of grape-vines, sumachs, and spruce bushes, where it intended to repose during the middle of the day. The place is covered with blood, the hoofs of the deer have left deep prints in the ground, as it bounced in the agonies produced by its wound ; but the blood that has gushed from its side discloses the course which it has taken. We soon reach the spot. There lies the buck, its tongue out, its eye dim, its breath...
Sida 254 - There is something in it which at times appears awfully grand. At other times a certain degree of fear creeps over the mind, and even affects the physical powers of him who follows the hunter through the thick undergrowth of our woods, having to leap his horse over hundreds of huge fallen trunks, at one time impeded by a straggling grape-vine crossing his path, at another squeezed between two stubborn saplings, whilst their twigs come smack in his face, as his companion has forced his way through...
Sida 237 - ... Painter, it being previously settled that the discoverer should blow his horn, and remain on the spot until the rest should join him. In less than an hour, the sound of the horn was clearly heard, and, sticking close to the squatter, off we went through the thick woods, guided only by the now and then repeated call of the distant huntsman.
Sida 257 - These tracts are discovered by persons on horseback in the woods, or a deer is observed crossing a road, a field, or a small stream. When this has been noticed twice, the deer may be shot from the places called stands, by the sportsman who is stationed there, and waits for it, a line of stands being generally formed so as to cross the path which the game will follow. The person who ascertains the usual pass of the game, or discovers the parts where the animal feeds or lies down during the day, gives...
Sida 259 - There it procures abundance of succulent roots, and of the tender juicy stems of plants, upon which it chiefly feeds at that season. During the summer heat, it enters the gloomy swamps, passes much of its time in wallowing in the mud, like a hog, and contents itself with crayfish, roots, and nettles, now and then, when hard pressed by hunger, seizing on a young pig, or perhaps a sow, or even a calf. As soon as the different kinds of berries which prow on the mountains begin to ripen, the Bears betake...
Sida 51 - ... only made me welcome, but promised all his assistance in forwarding my views. The long walks and long talks we have had together, I never can forget, or the many beautiful birds which we pursued, shot, and admired. The juicy venison, excellent bear flesh, and delightful trout, that daily formed my food, methinks I can still enjoy. And then, what pleasure I had in listening to him as he read his...

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