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TWILIGHT.
THERE is an evening twilight of the heart,

When its wild passion waves are luli'd to rest, And the eye sees life's fairy scenes depart,

As fades the daybeam in the rosy west. 'Tis with a nameless feeling of regret

We gaze upon them as they melt away, And fondly would we bid them linger yet,

But Hope is round us with her angel lay, Hailing afar some happier moonlight hour; Dear are her whispers still, though lost their

early power.

ENTERING HEAVEN. SOFTLY part away the tresses

From her forehead of pale clay, And across her quiet bosom

Let her pale hands lightly lay ; Never idle in her lifetime

Were they folded thus away. She hath lived a life of labour,

She hath done with toil and care, She hath lived a life of sorrow,

She hath nothing more to bearAnd the lips that never murmur'd

Never more shall move in prayer. You who watch'd with me beside her,

As her last of nights went by, Know how calmly she assured us

That her hour was drawing nigh; How she told us, sweetly smiling,

She was glad that she could die.
Many times, from off the pillow

Lifting up her face to hear,
She had seem'd to watch and listen,

Half in hope, and half in fear,
Often asking those about her

If the day were drawing near. Till, at last, as one aweary,

To herself she murmur'd low,
“Could I see him, could I bless him

Only once before I go!
If he knew that I was dying

He would come to me, I know."
Drawing then my head down gently,

Till it lay beside her own,
Said she, "Tell him in his anguish,

When he finds that I am gone,
That the bitterness of dying

Was to leave him here alone. “ Leave me now, my dear ones, leave me,

You are wearied all, I know;
You have been so kind and watchful,

You can do no more below-
And if none I love are near me,

"T will be easier to go. "Let your warm hands chill not, slipping

From my fingers' icy tips,
Be there not the touch of kisses

On my uncaressing lips,
Let no kindness see the darkening

Of my eye's last, long eclipse. “ Never think of me as lying

By the dismal mould o'erspread, But about the soft, white pillow

Polded underneath iny head; And of summer flowers weaving

A rich broidery o'er my bed.

" Think of the immortal spirit

Living up above the sky,
And of how my face, there wearing

Light of immortality,
Looking earthward, is o'erlaving

The white bastions of the sky."
Stilling then, with one last effort,

All her weakness and her woe,
She seem'd wrapp'd in pleasant visions

But to wait her time to go;
For she never, after midnight,

Spoke of anything below;
But kept murmuring very softly,

Of cool streams and pleasant bowers,
Of a path going up brightly,

Where the fields were white with flowers; And at daybreak she had enter'd

On a better life than ours.

glow

MUSIC OF OCEAN.

LONELY and wild it rose. That strain of solemn music from the sea, As though the bright air trembled to disclose

An ocean mystery.

Again a low, sweet tone, Fainting in murmurs on the listening day, Just bade the excited thought its presence own,

Then died away.

Once more the gush of sound, Struggling and swelling from the heaving plain, Thrilld a rich peal triumphantly around,

And fled again.

0, boundless deep! we know Thou hast strange wonders in thy gloom con

ceal'd, Gems, flashing gems, from whose unearthly

Sunlight is seal'd

And an eternal spring Showers her rich colours with unsparing hand, Where coral trees their graceful branches fing

O’er golden sand.

But tell, O, restless main!
Who are the dwellers in thy world beneath,
That thus the watery realm cannot contain

The joy they breathe

Emblem of glorious might!
Are thy wild children like thyself array'd,
Strong in immortal and uncheck'd delight,

Which cannot fade!

Or to inankind allied, Toiling with woe, and passion's fiery sting, Like their own home, where storms cr peace preside,

As the winds bring?

Alas for human thought!
How does it flee existence, worn and old,
To win companionship with beings wrought

or finer mould!

'Tis vain-the reckless waves Join with loud revel the dim ages flown, But keep each secret of their hidden caves

Dark and unknown.

green wool.

THE WORK-TABLE FRIEND.

repeat the stripes: miss 22 more, and repeat as much of the stripe as you can,

which will be 7 stitches of the twelve, and BERLIN TRAVELLING BAG. (à mille soies).

allow a single row of black all round.

In the directions for the broad stripe, Materials. Penelope canvass, No, 6, 14 yard, I shall use the initials of the colours. C. and the following wools and silks: Wool-black, 2'ozs.; light blueish green, 3 ozs.; scarlet, 14oz.; crimson, S. scarlet, L. lilac, Y. yellow : 4 shades lilac, $ oz. each ; 5 shades scarlet, oz.

Work from left to right. each; 5 shades crimson, } oz. each; 5 shades 1st Row.-- Miss 3, 1 s 1, 1 foss, miss 3, yellow. } oz. each. Floss-- lilac, 1 crimson, i scarlet; all lighter than the lightest wool.

1 s 2, 1 floss, miss 3, 1 s 3, 1 floss, miss 3, Price 4s. 6d.

1 y 3, 1 y 5, miss 2.

2nd Row.—Miss 3, 2 s 1, 1 floss, miss 2, In writing the receipt for this bag, I shall distinguish the shades of each colour

2 s 2, 1 floss, miss 2, 2 s 3, 1 floss, miss 3, by numbers, from 1 to 5, No 1 being the

1 y 5, miss 2. darkest.

3rd Row.-Miss 3, 2 s 1,1 s 3, 1 floss, By referring to the engraving it will be miss 1, 2 s 2, 1 s 4, í floss, miss'1, 2 s 3, seen that the bag has 4 broad stripes, and | 185, 1 floss, miss 5. three narrow ones, intervening, with a half

1th Row. --Miss 3, 2 s 1, 2 s 3, 1 floss, stripe at each edge. These narrow stripes 2 $ 2, 2 s 4, 1 floss, 2 s 3, 2 s 5, 1 floss,

miss 4. are in black and scarlet, the scarlet part

5th Row.--Miss 3, 2 s 1, 3 s 3, 2 s 2, 3 being marked in the centre stripe. 2. The ground, (marked 3) is in light

s 4, 2 s 3, 3 s 5, 1 floss, miss 3. Work entirely with double

6th Row.-- Miss 3, 2 s 1, 3 s 3, 1 s 2, 4 s wool.

4, 1 s 3, 5 s 5, 1 floss, miss 2. Each side of the bag is 140 squares (or

7th Row.— Miss 3, 2 s 1, 3 s 3, 5 s 4, 6 stitches) wide, and proportionably long,

s 5, 1 floss, miss 2. a narrow stripe goes up the centre occupy

8th Row.-Miss 3, 2 s 1, 3 s 3, 1 s 2, 4, ing 12 stitches, and is worked thus.

s 4, 1 s 3, 5 s 5, miss 3. Ist Row.-2 black, 8 scarlet, 2 black.

9th Row.-Miss 3, 2 s 1, 3 s 3, 2 s 2, 3 2nd Row.--2 black, 2 scarlet, 1 black,

s 4, 2 s 3, 3 s 5, miss 4. ? scarlet, 1 black, 2 scarlet, 2 black.

10th Row.-Miss 3, 2 s 1, 2 s 3, miss 1, 3rd Row.2 black, 1 scarlet, 2 black, 2,8 2, 2 s 4, miss 1, 2 s 3, 2 s 5, miss 2, i 2 scarlet, 2 black, 1 scarlet, 2 black.

lilac floss, miss 2. 4th Row.—5 black, 2 scarlet, 5 black.

11th Row.— Miss 3, 2 s 1, 1 s 3, miss 1, 5th Row. — Like 4th.

1 lilac floss, 2 s 2, 1 8 4, miss 2, 2 s 3, 1 6th Row.—2 black, miss 1, 2 black,

s 5, miss 2, 2 lilac floss. 2 scarlet, 2 black, miss 1, 2 black.

12th Row.-Miss 3, 2 s 1, miss 1, 1 lilac 7th Row.—1 black, miss 2, 2 black, floss, 2 1 2, 2 s 2, miss 3, 2 s 3, miss 2, 1 2 scarlet, 2 black, miss 2, 1 black.

1 floss, 1 1 4, 1 l floss, miss 2. 8th, 9th, and 10th Rows.—Miss 3, 2

(Observe lilac 4 is the lightest shade of black on black, 2 scarleton scarlet, 2

that colour, black being taken for the black on black, miss 3.

darkest.) 11th Row. Like 7th.

13th Row.-Miss 3, 1 s 1, miss 1, 1 1 12th Row.---Like 6th.

floss, 2 I 2, 1 s 2, miss 3, 1 1 floss, I s 3, 13th and 14th Rows. Like 4th.

miss 2, 1 1 floss, 2 14, 1 1 floss, miss 2. 15th Rou.Like 3rd.

14th Row.—Miss 4, 1 l floss, 3 12, il 16th Row.--Like 2nd.

floss, miss 2, 1 1 floss, 113, 1 1 floss, miss 17th and 18th Row.--Like Ist.

1, 1 lfloss, 3 1 4, 1 l floss, miss 2. Repeat these eighteen rows up to the

15th Row.—Miss 3, 1 l floss, 1 black, top: ‘miss 22 squares on each side, and 212, 11 floss, miss 1, 1 1 filoss, 2 13, 2 i

floss, 4 1 4, 1 1 floss, miss 2. * To enable ladies in the country to obtain,

16th Row.-Miss 3, 2 black, 3 1 2, 1 without difficulty, the proper materials for the 1 floss, 111, 313, 1 ) floss, 5 15, 1 1 floss, Work-Table designs in the Family Friend, Mrs. miss 2. PULLAN will, in future, append to every article the prices, on receipt of which, by stamps or Post

17th Row.--Miss 3, 2 black, 312, 211, office order, the articles will be forwarded by post. 313, 1 1 2, 5 15,1 l floss, miss 2.

[graphic][merged small]

18th Row.—Miss 3, 2 black, 312, 211, 27th Row.- Miss 5,2 c 3, 1 c 2, 5 c 4, 313,2 1 22,4 1 5, 1 1 floss, miss 2.

1 c 2, 5 c 3, 1 c floss, miss 2. 19th Row.-Miss 3, 2 black, 31 2,2 11, 28th Row.-Miss 4, 1 c 1, 2 c 3, 2 c 2, 313, miss 1, 2 12,3 1 5, 1 floss, miss 2. 3 c 4, 1 c 2, 1 c 1, 5 c 3, 1 c floss, Begin crimson floss.

miss 2. 20th Row.--Miss 4, 2 black, 2 1 2,2 11, 29th Row.-Miss 3, 2 c 1, 2.c 3, I c 4, 31 3, miss 1, 2 1 2, 3 1 5, 1 crimson floss, 2 c 2, 1 c 4, 1 c 2, 2 c 1, 5 c 3,1 c floss, miss 2.

miss 2. 21st Row.-Miss 5, 2 black, 1 1 2,2 11, 30th Row.-Miss 3, 2 c 1, 2 c 3, 2 c. 4, 313, miss 1, 212, 2 1 5,2 c floss, miss 2n 3 < 2, 2 c 1, 5 c 2, 1 c floss, miss 2.

22nd Row.--Miss 6, 2 black,,2 11,313, 31st Row,—Miss 3, 2 c 1, 2 c 3, 1 c 2, 1 c 4, 212,1 15,1 c floss, 1 c 3, 1 c floss, 2 c 4, 1 c 2, 1 c 4, 2 c 1, 5 c 3, I c floss, miss 2.

miss 2. 23rd Row.--Miss 7, 1 black, 211, 213, 32nd Row.-Miss 3, 2 c 1,2 c 3, 2 e 2, 2 c 4, 2 1 2, 1 c floss, 2 e 3, 1 c floss, 3 c 4, 2 c 1, 5 c 3, miss 3. miss 2.

33rd Row.-Miss 3, 2 c 1, 3c 3, 2 c 2, 24th Row.-Miss 8,21 1, 113,3 c 4, 13 c 4, 2 c 1, 3 c 3, miss 1, 1 c floss, 12,1 c floss, 3 e 3, 1 c floss, miss 2. miss 2.

25th Row.—Miss 9, 111, (the last lilae,) 34th Row.-Miss 4, 2 c 1, 2 c 3, miss I, 3 c 4, 1 c floss, 4 c 3, 1 c floss, miss 2. 2 c 2, 2 c 4, 1 c 5, 2 c 1, 1 c 3, miss 1, 2

26th Row.-Miss 6, 1 c 3, miss 2, 5 c 4, c floss, miss 2. 5 c3, 1 c floss, miss 2.

35th Row.-Miss 5, 2 c 1,1 c 3, miss 2, 2 c 2, 1 c 4, 2 c 5, 1 c 1, miss 1, 1 c floss, 3 y 4, 1 y 3, 1 y 4, 1 y ffoss, miss 3, 11 1 c 5, 1 c floss, miss 2.

[graphic]

FLOWERS IN CROCHET -THE JESSAMINE-BY MRS. PULLAN.

floss, miss 2. 36th Row.--Miss 6, 2 c 1, miss 2, 1 y 2, 45th Row.—Miss 3, 2 y 1, 3 y 3, 2 y 2, 2 1 2, 3 1 5, 1 l floss, 2 I 5, 1 1 floss, 3 y 1, 2 y 3, 1 y 5, 1 y ffoss, miss 5. miss 2.

46th Row.--Miss 3, 2 y 1, 3 y 3, 2 y 2, 37th Rou.—Miss 7, 1 c 1, miss 2, 2 y 2, 3 y 4, 2 y 3, 2 y 5, 1 y floss, mise 4. 112, 113, 5 1 5, 1 1 floss, miss 2.

47th Row.-Miss 3, 2 y 1, 3 y 3, 2 y 2, 38th Row.-Miss 10, 2 y 2, 1 y 4, 2 1 2, 3 y 4, 2 y 3, 3 y 5, 1 y floss, miss 3. 4 1 5, 1 1 floss, miss 2.

48th Row.- Miss 3, 2 y 1, 3 y 3, 2 y 2, 39th Row.-Miss 3, 1 y floss, miss 4, 13 y 4, 2 y 3, 4 y 5, 1 y floss, miss 2. y 2, miss 1, 2 y 2, 2 y 4, 2 1 3, 3 1 5, 1 1 49th Row.-Like 48th. floss, miss 2.

50th Row.-Miss 4, 2 y 1, 2 y 3, miss 1, 40th Row.-Miss 3, 1 y 1, 1 y floss, 2 y 2, 2 y 4, miss 1, 2 y 3, 3 y 5, 1 y floss, miss 3, 4 y 2, 3 y 4, 213, 2 1 5, 1 1 floss, miss 2. miss 2.

51st Row.-Miss 5, 2 y 1, 1 y 3, miss 2, 41st Row.—Miss 3, 2 y 1, 1 y ffoss, 2 y 2, 1 y 4, miss 2, 2 y 3, 2 y 5, I y floss, miss 2, 4 y 2, 3 y 4, 1 y floss, 213, 11 5, miss 2. 11 floss, miss 2.

52nd Row.-Miss 6, 2 y 1, miss 3, 2 y 2, 42nd Row.—Miss 3, 2 y 1, 1 y 3, 1 y miss 3, 2 y 3, 1 y 5, 1 y floss, miss 2. floss, miss 1, 4 y 3, 3 y 4, 1 y floss, miss 1. 53rd Row.—Miss 3, 1 scarlet floss, 2 1 3, 1 I floss, miss 2.

miss 3, 1 y 1, 1 s floss, miss 3, 1 y 2, 1 s 43rd Row.—Miss 3, 2 y 1, 2 y 3, 1 y floss, miss 3, 1 y 3, 1 s floss, miss 3, 2 y 3, ffoss, 2 y 2, 1 y 4, 1 y 2, 3 y 4, 1 y floss, 1 y floss, miss 2. Repeat from the Ist. miss 2, 1 1 3,11 floss, miss 2.

The third, (or middle one,) of the five 44th Row.—Miss 3, 2 y 1, 3 y 3, 2 y 2, shades of scarlet, must be the same as that

stem.

in the narrow stripes. The yellow is highest, and the darkest at the end of the shaded into a sort of olive-brown, both scarlet and crimson into brown.

1st Leaf. (For the points of the set.) The second stripe should be begun at Make 16 Ch, fold a bit of wire in the the 15th row of the first, and after the form of a hook. Slip the end in the last 53rd you should go on from the 1st. The chain, and work down it 6 Sc, 2 Sdc, 5 third stripe may begin at the 29th row, Dc, 1 Sdc, 2 Sc; draw the wool through, and the fourth at the 44th row. By and fasten off. this arrangement the brilliancy of the 2nd Leaf. (Two required). 13 Ch, bend pattern is much increased, the colours a bit of wire, and work over it, down the falling in different parts of the stripe, chain, 4 Sc, 3 Sdc, 5 Dc, 1 Sc. Fasten instead of in the same line across the off. bag.

3rd Leaf. (Four required). 10 Ch; The grounding should be done last. One bend the wire as before ; work on it, 3 Sc, row of black is to be worked completely 3 Sdc, 2 Cc, 1 Sdc, 1Sc; fasten off. round each side of the bag. The sides When the seven leaves are made, take a may have leather, as in an ordinary piece of the coarser wire, three inches carpet bag, or be simply sewed together. long; slip the point in the end of the

first leaf, fasten it to the fine wire stem of

the leaf, by winding some wool of the THE JESSAMINE.

same shade round it very evenly; place Materials. A reel of white cannetille; a little the next two leaves a little way down the coarser wire: a skein of pure white floss silk; a

stem, opposite each other, and continue small skein of yellow ditto; green Berlin wool of winding, covering in the ends of their three shades :-rather a yellow green is required, stems; place the other four leaves in and the shades must not be very light.

pairs in the same way, and wind round FOR THE Flower. With the white the wool, to the end of the wire. floss silk, make a chain of eight stitches ; Several of these sets of leaves should take a piece of cannetille a nail long, be made, and then flowers and leaves are and place it under the last chain. Cro- to be arranged in a tasteful manner, on a chet down the chain, working over the coarse wire. wire doubled, 7 Sc. Draw the silk through the last loop, and fasten off. This makes Our Mother.—Children ought to love, one petal, and five will be required for obey, and honour their parents. Let your each flower. To make up the flower, take a mother, in particular, who in your tender finger-length of the coarser wire, bend years has the more immediate charge of the end of it down closely in the form of you, be on earth the most sacred object of a hook, and wind round the top a piece your affections. Let her be your friend of yellow floss silk, two or three times. and chief confidant. Conceal nothing Then pinch the wire close together, and from her, but make her acquainted with wind the silk round both sides of the wire, the company which you keep, the books a little way. Round this head arrange which you read, and even the faults which the petals one by one, winding a little you commit. Happy is the son and parwhite silk round each. Continue to wind ticularly the daughter, who are not afraid the white silk round, for about of an to communicate to their mother their inch, and then cover the remainder of the more secret thoughts. While they remain stem with a light green wool. Do every thus artless and undisguised, they are free flower in the same manner. About five from danger. Children, obey your parents will be required for a small spray.

in youth ; but whenever you are no longer THE FOLIAGE.—The leaves of the jes- under their care, let not your reverence samine grow in sets ; each small branch abate. If by the providence of God you has a leaf at the point, and six others, should rise above them in the world, grow placed in twos, at the sides. Several of not ashamed of them. While they are ihese sets, made of the various shades of bending under the infirmities of old age, green, are arranged on a spray, care being still continue to treat them with respect taken that the lightest shall always be the as well as affection.

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