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BY ROBLEY DUNGLISON, M. D., M. A. P. S.
Professor of the Institutes of Medicine, &c., in Jefferson Medical College of Philadelphia ; one of
the attending physicians to the Philadelphia Hospital (Blockley); Fellow of the College

of Physicians; and Honorary Member of the Medical Society and College of
Pharmacy of Philadelphia, and of the Medical Societies of the states

of Massachusetts, New York, and Maryland, &c. &c. &c.

PHILADELPHIA:
PUBLISHED BY A. WALDIE, NO. 46, CARPENTER STREET,

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PREFACE.

At the expiration of the second year of the American Medical Library and Intelligencer, the editor trusts his subscribers will have found that there has been no relaxation in his efforts to render his publication what it has always purported to be," a concentrated record of medical science and literature."

In the “Library” part, the following distinct works have been reprinted :-Dr. W. Kramer on Diseases of the Ear, Dr. James Hamilton's Practical Observations on Midwifery, Mr. James Syme on Diseases of the Rectum, Dr. Jonathan Osborne on the nature and treatment of Dropsical Diseases, Dr. Jonathan Green on Diseases of the Skin, Mr. W. Coulson on Diseases of the Bladder, Mr. R. Liston's Practical Surgery, with one hundred and thirty engravings, and notes by Dr. Norris, Mr. George T. Morgan on Inflammation, Dr. A. B. Granville on Counter-irritation, Dr. T. Hodgkin on the Morbid Anatomy of the Serous and Mucous Membranes, Mr. T. Ryland on Diseases and Injuries of the Larynx and Trachea, Dr. R. Rowland on Neuralgia, Dr. R. Dunglison's Observations on the Condition of the Insane Poor, Dr. F. Churchill on the Diseases of Females, and Dr. Lallemand on Involuntary Seminal Discharges; the cost of the originals of which, in this country, would not be less, to our subscribers, than sixty dollars.

Besides these, the following essays on particular subjects have appeared in the “ Library.” Dr. J. Clendenning's Croonian Lectures, Experiments and Observations on the Pathology of the Heart, and Sir A. Cooper on Spermatocele or Varicocele of the Spermatic Cord.

The editor need scarcely add, that all the zeal, industry, and ability which he is capable of bestowing on the work to render it extensively useful, shall be continued in its future progress.

ROBLEY DUNGLISON. Philadelphia, 9 Girard St.,

March 15, 1839.

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THE

AMERICAN MEDICAL INTELLIGENCER.

Vol. II.

April 2, 1838.

No. 1.

ART. I.-ON THE HYDRATED PEROXIDE OF IRON AS AN

ANTIDOTE FOR ARSENIC.

BY JOSEPH E. MUSE, M. D., OF CAMBRIDGE, MARYLAND. To Professor Dunglison.

Cambridge, Md., March 1, 1838. Dear Sir,-In your “General Therapeutics” the hydrated peroxide of iron is suggested as an antidote to arsenic acid, though it is marked by you as questionable.

Drs. Bunsen and Berthold, in 1834, reported it as a true specific.

In the last January number of "Bell's Medical Library," I was much gratified to read “Experiments on the Hydrated Peroxide of Iron, by Dr. von Specs."

The fact being a very interesting one, I determined to satisfy myself, by a series of experiments, of the efficacy of the antidote; and I was, perhaps, the more inclined to be sceptic from having understood frequently, and from respectable sources, that arsenic would not kill a dog-and the experiments of Dr. Von Specs had been made with that animal.

For this purpose I prepared some hydrated peroxide of iron by a solution of the metal in nitro-muriatic acid, precipitated by an alkaline carbonate (I used carbonate of soda),-having dried the precipitate I obtained a beautiful specimen of "brown hematite,” or hydrated peroxide of iron ; I also borrowed of a kind neighbour a worthless dog, in full health, about two years old, and of ordinary size.

Being thus prepared with materials for the work of destruction and preservation at will, i determined, in the first place, to settle the question of the efficacy of the arsenic as a poison upon the animal economy of the dog ; and secondly, when I should have finished the first dog, or the first question, to obtain the loañ of another dog, and then to settle the second question, of the efficacy of the antidote to preserve him.

In my experiments it will be observed that I used the same quantities of arsenic reported to have been used by Dr. Von Specs, that I might have the more fair and appropriate results.

On Sunday afternoon, Feb. 18, 1838, at half past three o'clock, a scruple of the white oxide of arsenic was given, in minced meat, to the dog before described; at six o'clock the dog was not at all affected by it. The next morning, Monday, at nine o'clock, the dog, which was chained in a stall in my stable, appeared sickened, dull, and timid, -which two latter incidents I ascribed to his being a stranger both to the hostler, my assistant, and to myself, as well as to the fact of his being chained; and I name them because they were noticed by Dr. Von Specs, apparently, as pathological symptoms. His stall bore the evidence of emesis during the night, though

VOL. II.-1

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