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POETRY

PHILOLOGY.

Hook, LL.D. F.R.S. S.A. Archdeacon of English Synonymes explained in alpha- Huntingdon, &c. 410. 5s. betical order; with copious illustrations and Hora Subsiciva; or, a refutation of the examples drawn from the best writers. By popular opinion, as founded in prophecy, George Crabb, of Magdalen Hall, Oxford. that peace will ultinately prevail over th. 8vo, 11. Is.

whole world. By Jeremiah Jackson, M.A Leçons de Langue Italienne; ou gram. Vicar of Swaff ham Bulbeck, and late Fellow maire complete : suivie d'un supplement qui of St. John's, Cambridge. 8vo. 45. contient un liste de verbes avec leur régime, Every-day Christianity. By the Author of et des remarques sur la prononciation de Rhoda. 1 vol. 12mo. l'E, et de ro. Par A. Anaya, Maître de Scripture Characters; or, a Practical Imlangues. 7s.

provement of the principal Histories of the Å Table of all the French Parts of Speech; | Old and New Testament. By Thomas Rnexhibiting, iu one view, a comprehensive binson, M.A. late Vicar of St. Mary's. Leiepitome of French grammar. By L. S. de cester, and Fellow of 'Trinity College, Camla Serre. Is. 6d.

bridge. Abridged for the use of young pere The Elements of French Grammar. Ar- sons. 12o. 7s. ranged in a methodical manner. By M. Ch.

TOPOGRAPHY, de Bellicour, professor of the French language. Svo. 9s.

A Historical and Descriptive Account of A Greek Testament; principally taken the Town and Castle of Warwick, and of the from the text of Griesbach. By the Rev. neighbouring Spa of Leamington. To which E. Valpy. 12mo. 5s. bound.

are added, short notices of the Towns, VilItalian Phraseology, a companion to the lages, &c. within the circuit of ten miles. Grammar; comprising a selection of the With six engravings. 8vo. 165. royal paper,

il. 16s. most useful phrases, &c. By M. Santagnello, author of the Italian Grammar, &c.

A Topographical Account of the Isle of 12mo. 7s.

Axholme, in the County of Lincoln. To be completed in two volumes. By W. Peck.

Illustrated by engravings of views, portraits, A Year in Canada, and other poems. By &c. Vol. I. 4to. 21. 25.; and on royal paper, Ann Cuthbert Knight. 8vo. 55.

41. 4s. Mont St. Jean; a poem. By the Rev.

TRAVELS,
William Liddiard. 8vo. 5s.
The City of the Plague; a dramatic

Travels in Beloochistan and Sinde; ac

poem. By John Wilson, author of the Isle of Palms, companied by a geographical and historical &c. 8vo. 10s. 6d.

account of those countries. By Lieutenant

Henry Pottinger, of the Honourable East POLITICAL ECONOMY.

India Company's Service; Assistant to the Catechism of Political Economy; or, fa- Presicient at the Court of his Highness the miliar conversations on the manner in which Peishwa; and lare Assistant and Surveyor wealth is produced, distributed, and con with the Missions to Sinde and Persia. With sumed in society. Translated from the

a large two-sheet map of the country. 4to. French of Jean Baptiste Say, professor of 21.5s. Political Economy in the Athenue Royale Travels of Ali Bey, in Morocco, Tripoli, of Paris. 6s.

Cyprus, Egypt, Arabia, Syria, and Turkey, England, and the English People. By J. between the years 1803 and 1807. Written B. Say. Price ts. Gid.

by Himself. With nearly 100 engrasings.

2 vois. 4to. 61. 6s. Discourses on the Principles of Religious A Tour throughout the whole of France; Belief, as connected with human happiness or, New Topographical and Historical Sketch and improvement. By the Rev. Robert of all its inost important and interesting Morehead, A.M. late of Baliol College, Ox. Cities, Towns, Forts, Castles, Palaces, Islands; ford; Junior Minister of the Episcopal Cha- Harbours, Bridges, Rivers, Antiquities, &c. poel, Cowgate, Edinburgh. Vol. II. 8vo. Interspersed with curicus and illustrative 10s. 6d.

anecdotes of the Manners, Customs, Dress, A Familiar and Practical Exposition of &c. of the inhabitants. By John Barnes, the Thirty-nine Articles of Religion of the embellished with many copper-plates and a United Church of England and Ireland. By map. 12mo. 4s. half-bound. the Rev. 1. C. O'Donnoghue, A. M. of St. John's College, Cambridge. 8vo. 7s. 6d.

VETERINARY SCIENCE, A Charge delivered to the Clergy of the

A Practical Treatise on the Diseases of Archdeaconry of Huntingdon, at the Pri- the foot of the Horse. With Observations mary Visitation in the

year

1815. With an on Shoeing. By Richard Hayward Budd, appendix and notes. "By the Rev. James Veterinary Surgeon, 8vo, 10s. 6d.

THEOLOGY,

AUSTRIA

M. de Schreibers, Director of the CaForeign Literary Cazette.

binet of Natural History at Vienna, has sent to the Academy two specimens of the Proteus Anguinus; and the Cabinet of Mineralogy has been enriched with a col.

lection of minerals, transmitted by the Die Ritter Academie, fr. On the The

department of Mines. resiau Noble Academy at Vienna : by Professor Bommer. This account ap

To the Polytechnic Cabinet is now peared, for the first time, in the Patriotic united all the models belonging to the Papers of 1813. The course of Instruction general direction of bridges, highways, &c. in this Academy is entrusted to forty-two

The Observatory has received three Monks of the regular schools; and the large instruments, made by M. Reichennamber of scholars is about two hundred bach, 1. A complete multiplying and and forty; of which one hundred are sons

astronomical circle, three feet in diameter. of nobility, or of noble descent, who pay | 2. A meridional telescope of six feer. 3. five hundred forins, yearly, and furnish | An equatorial iustrument, of a new conthemselves in all respects, at their own

struction, cost, besides paying music masters, fencing

The Cabinets of Medals and of Anti. masters, riding masters, &c. The other quities have received the extensive colscholars pay nearly two hundred Acrius, lection of medals, coins, and engraved yearly, and the deficit iu their payments is stones, of the Prince Abbot of St. Emeran, made up by the Government.

at Ratisbon; and that of the Court of the The income of this Academy is derived Deanery of the same city. from seveu seignorial estates situated in The class of History has made a report Hungary, Moravia, and Lower Austria. on certain ancient instrumeuts of copper,

The Library contains nearly fifty thousand Mosaic pavements, and other antiquities volumes. Fifteen scholars who reckon six- found near Alterwied and Tackarding. teen quarterings, obtain the title of “ Noble

Besides these memoirs, the Academy Imperial pages.". Those who quit this publishes au Annual Report of its labours, establishment, enjoy an annual pension of and notices of those pursuits in which its three hundred Horins; till opportunity classes have been engaged. These papers offers for their admission into a place, or a

also announce the decisions of this learned situation, suited to their acquisitious and body, the history of establishments formed talents.

in behalf of sciences, resources obtained or

enlarged, of whatever kind, &c. The whole The Memoirs of the Royal Academy of is intended, not merely to interest the Sciences at Munich, for the years 1811, learned, but the public, in favour of 1812, published in 1813, contain an ac- science, and the liberal studies. count of considerable augmentations and improvements, which have been established

FRANCE. in favour of that institution.

In a recent publication intitled Eramen The department of Natural History has des principes les plus fuvorable aur progrès de received great accessions of books on the l'Agriculiure, $c, the author seems to us, subject; with many articles also of Natural to have gone somewhat out of his way, to History, selected from the collections of present a picture of the State of France, as the Chevalier Cobres, at Augsburgh, and it was, with respect to parties, a few purchased by the Prince Royal of Bavaria, months back. It is understood to be a fair for 12,000 florins. The number of books account. is about 2000 rare and valuable; the num Says our author, “ It is unhappily true, ber of preserved subjects, &c, is 580. that there exists in France, three parties

The central library has been augmented very distinct, and marked. The first is by the incorporation of that of St. Emeran, that of the extruvugant Purtizuns of the at Ratisbon, and sundry others.

Anvient Regime; these, recollecting with By two royal decrees of October 4 and grief the loss of their privileges, and the 17, 1811, the place of President of the destruction of the former commanding boAcademy is suppressed, and the duties are dies of the State, cannot support the notion discharged by a Secretary-General, with of any change whatever in the goverùseparate secretaries for each class. By ment, thoughi merely as a moditication. another decree of December 2, the funds The Coustitutionai Charter which destroy. of the Academy have been · augmented ed their dearest hopes, is the object of their with a considerable sum, supplied by the dislike. Their attachment to the King stamp-duty on Almanacks.

cannot be doubted, and therefore, there is VOL. IV. Lit. Pan. No. 20, N. S. May 1.

L

BAVARIA,

every room to bope, that from respect for desires peace and tranquillity, the stabi: him, and for their own interests, they will lity of the Constitution, and of the Laws, sooner or later, be reconciled to this Char: the support of which is absolutely necessary ter, which is now become a fundamental to enable them to look to their own affairs, law of the kingilom. .

and to pursue their lawful occupations. The nobles in general being the princi. This party is composed of persons of pa! proprietors of vested interests, will dis- property, manufacturers, merchants, and cover, that they, of all men, are the most tradesmen; it comprises also the laborious deeply interested in the punctual execution classes, so that the population at large is of this charter, which gusrantees to them on this side: It curses the Imperial Goa the peaceable enjoyment of their property. vernment, and its agents, the tyranny and

The second party is that of the Friends injustice of which it has so often experia of Buonaparte, into which the Republicans enced: it is singularly attached to the Cons were mingled and amalgamated. He had stitutional Government, and it will become made friends of those who composed this niore and more attached, by the repeated last party, by giving them places and em assurances given, that the Charter shall be ployments civil or military, by his distri- preserved iuviolate, by which its prorerty bution of honours, by favours and dona is secured, with the laws, by which the tions, and most of all by promises of addixme and the feudal droits are irrevocably viincement, and of what he would do for suppressed. That this great mass ivcludes them, by which means be had secured the almost every inhabitant of the cities, and devotedvess of the officers and soldiers. It of the country at large, admits of no quesmay be supposed, that these last, espe- tion or dispute." cially, regret a government that loaded

Difficult Prize Question won by a Lady. them withi wealth and honours, and granted

At the sitting of the first class of the Into their profession a marked preference over all others. . . These are the most stitut, December 26, 1815, a circumstance dangerous enemies of the Constitutional somewhat remarkable took place

. A prize Government. This party also includes

question that bad been proposed three many individuals who have joived it

, I different times, and was kept on the list of through apprehension of the disturbance prizes during six years, was at length anof sales of National Property, and of other prize. It is the first instance of the kind

swered by a lady, who obtained the highest institutions throughout France. These are

in France. The lady is Mademoiselle muistoken, but they have not separated their interests from those of their fellow citizens: Sophie Germanes: the subject was a very and it may be hoped, that the prudence of important, question in Mathematics and the King and the two Chambers, will re

Natural Philosophy :-On the resolution of concile them, by correcting their opinions Surfaces. Various other prizes were awarded

the Problem of the Vibraiions of Elustic The number of Friends of Buonaparte, not so great as some have imagined. When at the same time, but this, as might be exhe proceeded to execute his plan for form- pected, was by far the most noticed. ang a body of Fédérés, to oppose the national guard, he failed in many depart The Society of Sciences at Goettingen ments: at Paris be never could assemble has proposed among other things, a prize more than from two to three thousand, of for the discovery of a cheap and easy mewubich nany were incorporated by force. thod of preparing, during the burning of The inhabitants of the Fauxbourgs St. wood, the pyroligneous acid, or Vinegur Viartin, St. Denis, and the Temple, obsti- of Wood, in such a manner, and to such pately refused to enter into these federa-extent, that it may be used instead of vitions. The acclamations which the pre- vegar, in domestic service, and for the pursence of the King excited in the Faux. poses of the Arts and Manufactures. bourg St. Antoine, and in all the others, Die Hoehen der Erde, &c. The Heights demonstrated the loyalty of the labouring of the Earth have lately been treated in a classes in Paris. The same observations descriptive volume, printed at Frankfort. Dave been niade in all the departments. In the first section of the work, the author The most numerous, active, and dauger- treats on the heights of mountains, of val. ons partizans of Napoleon, were unques- leys, of lakes, and other elevated points of tionably in the army.

the globe; such as-the Maritime Alps, The third party is that of the Great Mass, with the Appenines—the Grey Alps--the seast part of the Nation, which equally Mouut Cenis, &c. The Peninine Alps fears the excess of anarchy, and the arbi- and Mount Blanc, &c. The Lepontine trai'y acts of an absolute government, which Alps; those of the Canton of Berne;

GERMANY

HUNGARY.

the other Alps of Switzerland; &c. He From the tenor of certain essays which theu adverts to mountains, as the Haemus, appeared in the years 1810, 1811, it should the Lacha, the Carpathiau, the Sudetes, seem that there was a serious apprehension the mountains of Upper Lusatia, of Bo- of the return of barbarous times, in Gerhemia, the Hartz, the Jura, the Ceven- many, in consequence of the tyranny exnes, the Pyrennees, those of Britain, ofercised by Napoleon. One of these pubIceland, &c.-addmg also those of Africa, lished in the Vaterlandisches Museum, the Asia, and America.

Museum of our Native Country, was inThe first Supplement contains the titled On the Fear of a Scientific Barbarism, heights of 794 cities, towns, valleys, approaching : The author deduces the core lakes, &c. in alphabetical order. The ruption of the German character, from the second marks the heights of various edi.

evident diminution of national industy." If fices, columus, rud obelisks: the heights this be well founded, what an escape had of nineteen churches and towers: of the Europe, by means of the expedition of NaPyramids--as well those of Egypt, as those poleon to Moscow! of New Spain. The number of mountains described, is two hundred and five :-with notices on their structure, and most re-sity of Pesth, in 1814, was $05; of which

The number of students in the Univermarkable productious.

70 were students in Theology; 182 in MeThe Constitution sketched out for Ger-dicine and Surgery; 192 in Jurisprudence; many by the Congress at Vienua, has, as and 361 in Philosophy.--The number of it might be expected, given occasion to students in the Gymnasium of the same various publications. Amoug others, one city was 576; that of the College of Deprofesses to be the History of Civil Libreezin was 550. In the Catholic Lyceum berty in Germany; or the rights of the ci- of Clausenbery, were reckoned students in tizens, of the nobility, and of the eccle- Philosophy 136; in Surgery 16; in Jurissiastics. Wurtzburg. ' 2 vols. 8vo. prudence 80; in all 232. In the College

The writer, M. Montag, treats on these of the Reformed Religion of the same town, subjects in several distinctions; which we were reckoned 636; and in the Unitarian conceive must be very acceptable in his College 206. own country, though they would not, persium at Presburgh, has lately been consi

The Library of the Lutheran Gymnabaps, greatly interest British readers.

derably augmented by voluntary dona. Barbary Powers, to reduce.

tions. The proposals made by our naval hero, Bir Sydney Smith, for reducing the power The state of the public mind in Prussia of the Barbary States within due bounds, is not entirely understood by those who -a proposal which is likely to be sup- have no immediate communication with ported by all the Chivalry of Europe, has that country; did we not know this from excited considerable emotion on the Con- other means, we might easily infer it, from tinent. It has also given occasion to the the publication of a selt of Satirical Lecpublication of a volume entitled Ueber dietures, delivered at Berlin in the winter of Seeraeuber im Mittelmeer, &c. Observations 1813-14. The first volume has been pubon the Measures to be taken to exterminate lished, and has already reached a second the Corsairs in the Mediterranean, accom Edition panied by historical and statistical illustra The subjects treated on in this sett are-fions. It was published at Lubeck, in On the present age of Gold-On Hell, 1815.

and those who are in Hell-fire.-On tho This work was addressed to the Con- | Art of becoming rich-On the Art of obgress at Vienna. The author begins with taining a good place--On the Art of obtaina rapid glance at the history of the Bar. ing immortal renown~The tactics of the bary States, and their connections with the slipper, or the Art of domineering over States of Europe during the last three cen. men-On Education-The Natural History turies. He next examines their strength of the Ass—The Natural History of the by land and by sea, at the early part of Monkey-On the Landsturm fever. the nineteenth century, and closes with

In a sitting of the University of Berlin, general remarks on their mode of exercis held August 3, 1815, Dr. Tralles commuing their piracies.

nicated a notice of the calculations made by This matter is under further considera- M. Bessel, at Konigsburg, of the orbit of tion ; and these pirates have already made the comet of Olbers, seen in that year:restitution of nearly 200 captives to the the periodical revolution of which he fixes Emperor of Austria.

at aventy-four years.

PRUSSIA.

every room to hope, that from respect for | desires peace and tranquility, the stabi: him, and for their own interests, they will lity of the Constitution, and of the Lairs, sooner or later, be reconciled to this Cbar. the support of which is absolutely necessary ter, which is now become a fundamental to enable them to look to their own affairs, law of the kingdom..

and to pursue their lawful occupations. The nobles in general being the princi This party is composed of persons of pal proprietors of vested interests, will dis- property, manufacturers, merchants, and cover, that they, of all men, are the most tradesmen; it comprises also the laborious deeply interested in the punctual execution classes, so that the population at large is of this charter, which guarantees to them on this side: It curses the Imperial Gothe peaceable enjoyment of their property. vernment, and its agents, the tyranny and

The second party is that of the Friends injustice of which it has so often experiof Buonaparte, into which the Republicans enced: it is singularly attached to the Conwere mingled and amalgamated. He had stitutional Government, and it will become made friends of those who composed this niore and more attached, by the repeated last party, by giving them places and em assurances given, that the Charter shall be ployments civil or military, by his distri-preserved in violate, by which its property bution of honours, by favours and dona | is secured, with the laws, by which the tions, and most of all by promises of ad-dixme and the feudal droits are irrevocably vincement, and of what he would do for suppressed. That this great mass includes .them, by wbich means he had secured the almost every inhabitant of the cities, and devotedness of the officers and soldiers. It of the country at large, admits of no ques. may be supposed, that these Jast, espe- tion or dispute." cially, regret a government that loaded Difficult Prise Question won by a Lady. them with wealth and honours, and granted to their profession a marked preference

At the sitting of the first class of the Inover all others. . . These are the most stitut, December 26, 1815, a circumstance dangerous enemies of the Constitutional somewhat remarkable took place. A prize

question that had been proposed three Government. This party also includes

different times, and was kept on the list of many individuals who have joined it, through apprehension of the disturbance prizes during six years, was at length aaof sales of National Property, and of other swered by a lady, who obtained the highest institutions throughout France. These are

prize. It is the first instance of the kind mistaken, but they have not separated their

in France. The lady is Mademoiselle interests from those of their fellow citizens: Sophie Germanes: the subject was a very and it may be hoped, that the prudence of important, question in Mathematics and the King and the two Chambers, will re

Natural Philosophy :-On the resolution of concile them, by correcting their opinions Surfaces. Various other prizes were awarded

the Problem of the Vibraiions of Elastic The number of Friends of Buonaparte, is

at the same time, but this, as might be exnot so great as some have imagined. When he proceeded to execute his plan for form. pected, was by far the most noticed. ing a body of Fédérés, to oppose the national guard, he failed in many depart The Society of Sciences at Goettingen 'ments: at Paris be never could assemble has proposed among other things, a prize more than from two to three thousand, of for the discovery of a cheap and easy me. which inany were incorporated by force.thod of preparing, during the burning of The inhabitants of the Fauxbourgs St. wood, the pyroligueous acid, or Vinegut Vartin, St. Denis, and the Temple, obsti- of Wood, in such a manner, and to such nately refused to evter into these federa-extent, that it may be used instead of vi. tions. The acclamations which the pre-negar, in domestic service, and for the pure sence of the King excited in the Faux-poses of the Arts and Manufactures. bourg St. Antoine, and in all the others, Die Hoehen der Erde, &c. The Heights demonstrated the loyalty of the labouring of the Earth bave lately been treated in a classes in Paris. The same observations descriptive volume, printed at Frankfort have been niade in all the departments. In the first section of the work, the author 'The most numerous, active, and danger- treats on the heights of mountains, of val. Oils partizans of Napoleon, were unques- leys, of lakes, and other elevated points of tionally in the army.

the globe; such as--the Maritime Alps, The third party is that of the Great Mass, with the Appenines--the Grey Alpsthe poteris part of the Nation, which equally Mount Cenis, &c. The Peninine Alpe fears the excess of anarchy, and the arbi- and Mount Blanc, &c. The Lepontine trary acts of au absolute government, which Alps; those of the Canton of Berne;

GERMANY

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