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the happy. They who have the custody of the wretched being are too prone to forget their duty and his claims upon them for kindness and forbearance. Their sympathy is exhausted, and their kindness becomes blunted by familiarity with misery. They often give up the feelings of the friend for the apathy of the jailer; and, after reducing the madman to the utmost degradation of which human nature is capable, so that he has lost almost the form and appearance of a man, they have in many cases utterly neglected even the appearance of ministering to his wants. There is, too, on this subject, a common error, that the maniac is insensible to suffering, and that the disease is incurable: thus the unfortunate subjects of this malady, as if they had lost their birthright as men—“as if they were fallen stars from the sphere of reason”—are consigned over to chains and imprisonment, and doomed to wear away a wretched existence, until death, like a kind angel, comes to their relief.

We need something to supply this defect in private sympathy, for it is not true that the insane are insensible to suffering. Hunger, cold, confinement, neglect, and the privation of all the accustomed comforts of life, affect them as it would affect us. Besides, in many cases of insanity, there is a morbidly increased sensibility to physical suffering.

The disease is far from being incurable. It has been stated to the committee by professional gentlemen—and their statements are fully supported by reports from various hospitals—that nine out of ten insane have been restored to reason, when placed under judicious treatment in the early stages of the disease. Cases of very long standing have been relieved, and instances often occur of a restoration after years of insanity.—The report of an asylum near Philadelphia gives the following result:—Admitted in five years, 158 patients; discharged in the same time, recovered, 53; improved, 17; much improved, 23; without change, nine. In the retreat at York, England, out of 40 patients admitted within three months after the first attack, the whole number, 40, were restored to their friends recovered; of those admitted after three and within twelve months, the proportion of cures was as 25 to 45; but of those whose disease was of more than two years’ standing, the proportion of cures was only as 14 to 79. A report from the Connecticut retreat shows the ratio of recovery in the old cases to be 26 to the hundred; and out of 24 recent cases, 22 were recovered.

Some incipient movements have been made in the States of New York and New Jersey, towards making suitable provision for this unhappy class of persons.

Estimated number of Lunatics in the United States.—Assuming that the number of lunatics is as one to a thousand of the population, which is found to correspond nearly with facts where they have been ascertained, the follow

ing table will show nearly the number in each State and Territory.

Maine, 399 Kentucky, 687 New Hampshire, 259 Tennessee, 681 Vermont, 280 Ohio, 935 Massachusetts, 610 Louisiana, 215 Rhode Island, 97 Indiana, 139 Connecticut, 297 Illinois, 157 New York, 1,918 Alabama, 309 New Jersey, 320 Missouri, 140 Pennsylvania, 1,348 Michigan, 31 Delaware, 76 Arkansas, 30 Maryland, 447 Florida, 35 Virginia, 1,211 Dist. of Columbia, 39 North Carolina, 737 South Carolina, 516 Total, 11,919

In five or six of the States there are private asylums, which may contain in all about a thousand. For the remaining 10,919 no suitable means are used for their restoration. About 7,000 or 8,000 of them are paupers, most of whom are confined, or run at large, the objects of neglect or abuse, similar to what is represented by the committee of the legislature of New Hampshire.

Imprisonment for Debt.—Laws have been enacted in the States of Maine and Massachusetts, which virtually abolish imprisonment for debt. The laws in the other States remain nearly as they have been represented in the preceding reports of the society.

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Berlin Missionary Society.—Four missionaries of the Society for Foreign Missions, recently established at Berlin in Prussia, who embarked during the last autumn, have arrived at the Cape of Good Hope. About the time of their arrival, a party, headed by Dr. Smith of Cape Town, under the patronage of an association in London, were ready to start on a tour for exploring the territory situated between the most advanced missionary stations und De La Goa Bay. At the request of the exploring party these four missianaries accompanied them, with a view to occupying a field of labor in that quarter.

French Mission in South Africa.-Mr. Lemue, a French o at Motito, near Lattakoo, has prepared a map of an extensive tract of country in the interior of South Asiica, which he has explored himself, or respecting which he has obtained accurato information from other explorers.

Rhenish Missionary Society.—This society, constituted by the union of the smaller associations of Barmen, Elberfeld, Wesel, Cologne, and Mark, received, during the year preceding its last report, 34,576 francs; and expended 35,746 francs. It has four stations in South Africa, all within the Colony of the Cape of Good Hope; at which there are eight missionaries. The society has fourteen candidates for missionary service in a course of education at its Seminary.

.Mission to Borneo.—Two missionaries from the Rhenish Society just noticed, embarked at Amsterdain, in August last, for Batavia, destined to attempt a mission among the 1:ayaks of Borneo. One of the chiefs of this barbarous people, at the suggestion of a Dutch civil officer, had determined to albolish the savage practice of making war to collect human heads with which to ornament their dwellings, and was disposed to receive teachers.

Serampore Baptist Mission.—The Rev. Dr. Carey, the sountler of this mission, died on the 9th of June, 1834, at the age of 73.

àmeritan i50art of Commiggioners for Jortign offigions,

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100mations, From DEcEMBER 11th, to January 10th, inclusive. Auburn and vic. N. Y., H. Ivison, Jr. Agent, Auburn, Mon. con. in 1st chh. 25, 39 Cazenovia, Free chh. 20 00 Cortlandville, Chh. 58-40 Genoa, 1st presb. chh. 4,25; mon. con. 8,62; 1287 Lansing, Chh. 15 85 Ludlowville, Presb. chh.. to constitute Bessamin Joy an Honorary Member of the Board, 100 00 Owasco, Bible class miss. so. for bibles, 15, 25–207 76 Barnstable co., Ms. Aux. So. Rev. N. Cogswell, Tr. Cotuit, Friends, 13 00 North Dennis, Gent. and la- 15 to Sandwich, Gent. and la. 85; mon. con. 65,06; 150 06 Yarmouth, Gent. and la- to constitute Rev. Nathanael Cooswell an Honorary Member of the Board, 50 00–228 68 Of the above, $100 for Rev. S. Munson. Chittenden co. Vt. Aux. So. W. I. Seymour, Tr. Burlington, La. 20 00

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WARIOUS COLLECTIONS AND DONATIONs.

.Acton. Ms. Indiv. of evang. chh. (of which to constitute Rev. James T. Woodbury

an Honorary Member of the Board, 50;) 75 56 ..Alleghany, Pa. Sah. sch. in presb chh. 3 00 .Amherst, S. par. Ms. Fem. char. so. 10 00 ...Andover, Ms. Mon. con. in Theol. sem. 109 00 4, gyle, N. Y., D. Stevenson, 5 00 Jirkpurt, N. Y. Mon. con. 15 00 Aron, ot. Mrs. L. Kellogg, for Bela Kellogg in Čeylon. 15 00 Barre, Ms. Mon. con. in evang, chh. 41 00 Belchertown, Ms. J. Walker, 10 00 Berkley, Ms. Gent. asso. a 00 Boston, Ms. Asa Ward, 90; a mechanic, 5; 25 00 Brooklyne, Pa. Coll. in presb. chh. 13; indiv. 8,25; 21 25 Bucksport, Me. Mon. con. 50 00 Cambridgeport, Ms. Miss B’s sab. sch. class in Mr. S's so. for Iniss. to China, 1 00 Camden, Me. Gent. asso. and mon. con. 16 36 Canonsburg, Pa. Sab. sch. in college chh.. for miss. to W. Afica, 4,34; for Mahratta miss. 4,40; fem. miss. so. 40; Inou. con. 20; M. Brown, 5; 73 74 Charlestown, Ms. Mon. con, in Winthrop so. 81 19 Connecticut, A friend. 20; do. 3; 23 00 Constable, N. Y. Mon. con. 1 00 Danville, Pa. Mon. con. in presb. chh. 100 00 East Aurora, N. Y. Mon. con. 3 41 Ellicottrille, N. Y. Mon. con in presb. chh. 6 00 Hamp. Chris. Depos, Ms. Gen. agency of the Miss. Herald, viz. Ash.field, Rev. T. S. 4,40; Bloody Brook, Rev. T. S. C. 2,80; Buckland, Mr. H. 1,20; Charlemont, Rev. W.T. 2,80; Chesterfield. M. B. 2; Conway, J. W. 80c. East Hampton, S. W. 40c. Gorham. J. L. 2; Granby West. H. W. G. 1,60; Hadley, N. C. Jr. 7,25; Hatfield, C. P. 5,10; Hawley, J. L. 2; Northampton, D. S. W. 10,86; Norwich, N. S. 2,80; South Hadley, W. L. 2,40; Southampton, E. E. 3,20; Sunderland, 40c. West Hampton, Rev. E. H. 4,40; Whateley, L. B. 4; Williamsburgh, Rev. H. L. 4,40; 64 81 Hillsboro’, N. H. Mrs. Mary Simonds, given on her death bed, 50 00 Holliston, Ms. Mon. con. 25 21 Lamington, N. J. Presb. chh. 23 00. Lenor, Ms. Mon. con in N. sch. dist. 10 00 Lyme, N. H. Rev. NATH AN El LAMBERT, which constitutes him an Honorary Member of the Board, 50 00 JManchester, Vt. Mon. con. in cong. so. 30 00 .Marlboro’, Ms. Mon. con. 26 80. JMassachusetts, A friend, for printing Osage books, 10; Mr. H. l; 11 00 .Mattancan, N. Y. Presb. chh.. mon, con. 12 00 .Medina, N.Y. Coll. 151 78 .Moira, N. Y. Mon. con. 1 50 ..Morristown, N. J. Mrs. C. B. Ardin, 30 00 .Napoli, N. Y. Mon, con. in presb. chh. 5 00 .Nassau, N. Y., A friend, 1 00 .Neuchern, N. C. Mon. con. in presb. chh. 10 00 .Newbury, Ms. Mon, con. in Belleville cong. so. 1227 .New Castle Presbytery, Chancesord cong. for support of Rev. B. Schneider, 45 00 .New Haven, Ct. H. for China, 3 00 .Now Marlboro’, Ms Indiv. 10 32 .New York city, Ladies of Brick chh.. for Spring sch. in Ceylon, 36; W. S. 10; scholars of Miss Goldsmith, 20; chil. of Central presb. chh.. sab. sch. 2,15; a friend, 3; do. 1,75; 72 90 .North Reading, Ms. Mon. con. in cong. so. 17 00 .Norwich, Ct. Av. of jewelry, 9 53 Orange, N. J. Mon, con. in 1st presb. chh. 15 00

Philadelphia, Pa. J. Stille, (of which to constitute Rev. H. A. Board MAN an Hononly Member of the Board 50,) 100; T. Fleming, 100; W. Brown, 50; G. Ralston. 50; S. Hildeburn. 50; Mrs. Blain, 40; N. Burt, 25; other indiv. of 10th presb. chh. 125,39; coll. in 1st presb. chh. 542,10; indiv. of 2d presb. chh. (of which for E/eanor Cuyler in Ceylon, 20;) 120,50; coll. in 3d presb. chl. 105,81; d.o. in 6th do. 50;

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The engraving above presents a view of the Mission House and premises at Mackinaw, together with a portion of the island. This paper will be principally occupied with a brief | account of the object, character, and success of this mission.

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