Social Protest Thought in the African Methodist Episcopal Church, 1862-1939

Framsida
Stephen W. Angell, Stephen Ward Angell, Anthony B. Pinn, Agnes Cullen Arnold Professor of Humanities Anthony B Pinn
Univ. of Tennessee Press, 2000 - 357 sidor
"Angell and Pinn have selected a set of lively and significant examples of social protest literature from A.M.E. Church periodicals and demonstrated that these newspapers and journals represent a critically important location in which African Americans debated vital questions of the day."--Judith Weisenfeld, Barnard College

Although the African Methodist Episcopal (A.M.E.) Church has long been acknowledged as a crucial institution in African American life during the nineteenth and twentieth centuries, relatively little attention has been given to the ways in which the church's publications influenced social awareness and protest among its members and others, both in the United States and abroad. Filling that gap, this volume brings together a rich sampling of A.M.E. literature addressing a variety of social issues and controversies.

As the editors observe, the formation of independent black churches in the early nineteenth century was not just a religious act but a political one with ramifications extending into every area of life. The A.M.E. Church, as a leader among those new denominations, made the educational, moral, political, and social needs of black Americans a constant concern. Through its newspapers and magazines--including the A.M.E. Church Review and the Christian Recorder--the church produced a steady flow of news articles, editorials, and scholarly essays that articulated its positions, nurtured intellectual debate, and contributed to the ongoing struggle for racial equality.

Drawing together writings from the Civil War era to the eve of World War II, this book is organized thematically. Each chapter presents a selection of A.M.E. sources on a particular topic: civil rights, education, black theology, African missions and emigrationism, women's identities, and socialism and the social gospel. Among the writers represented are such notable figures as W. E. B. Du Bois, Henry McNeal Turner, Ida B. Wells, Amanda Berry Smith, and Benjamin Tucker Tanner.

An invaluable new resource for researchers and students, this book demonstrates both the variety and vitality of A.M.E. social and political thought.

The Editors: Stephen W. Angell is associate professor of religion at Florida A&M University and author of Henry McNeal Turner and African-American Religion in the South.

Anthony B. Pinn is associate professor of religious studies at Macalester College. He is the author of Why Lord? Suffering and Evil in Black Theology and Varieties of African American Religious Experience and editor of Making the Gospel Plain: The Writings of Bishop Reverdy C. Ransom.

Från bokens innehåll

Så tycker andra - Skriv en recension

Vi kunde inte hitta några recensioner.

Andra upplagor - Visa alla

Vanliga ord och fraser

Om författaren (2000)

The Editors: Stephen W. Angell is associate professor of religion at Florida A&M University and author of Henry McNeal Turner and African-American Religion in the South.

Anthony B. Pinn is associate professor of religious studies at Macalester College. He is the author of Why Lord? Suffering and Evil in Black Theology and Varieties of African American Religious Experience and editor of Making the Gospel Plain: The Writings of Bishop Reverdy C. Ransom.

Bibliografisk information