Black's Picturesque Tourist of Scotland

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A. & C. Black, 1845 - 442 sidor

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Sida 382 - That man is little to be envied, whose patriotism would not gain force upon the plain of Marathon, or whose piety would not grow • warmer among the ruins of lona.
Sida 116 - When the broken arches are black in night, And each shafted oriel glimmers white; When the cold light's uncertain shower Streams on the ruined central tower; When buttress and buttress, alternately, Seem framed of ebon and ivory...
Sida 196 - And near, and nearer as they row'd, Distinct the martial ditty flowed. BOAT SONG Hail to the Chief who in triumph advances ! Honour'd and bless'd be the ever-green Pine ! Long may the tree, in his banner that glances, Flourish, the shelter and grace of our line...
Sida 93 - Marmion's rank. That Castle rises on the steep Of the green vale of Tyne : And far beneath, where slow they creep From pool to eddy, dark and deep, Where alders moist and willows weep, You hear her streams repine. The towers in different ages rose ; Their various architecture shows The builders' various hands ; A mighty mass,-that could oppose, When deadliest hatred fired its foes, The vengeful Douglas bands.
Sida 124 - Down from that strength had spurr'd their horse, Their southern rapine to renew, Far in the distant Cheviots blue, And, home returning, fill'd the hall With revel, wassel-rout, and brawl.
Sida 116 - The moon on the east oriel shone, Through slender shafts of shapely stone, By foliaged tracery combined ; Thou would'st have thought some fairy's hand ' Twixt poplars straight the ozier wand, In many a freakish knot, had twined ; Then framed a spell, when the work was done, And changed the willow wreaths to stone.
Sida 196 - THE moon's on the lake, and the mist's on the brae, And the Clan has a name that is nameless by day; Then gather, gather, gather, Grigalach Gather, gather, gather, &c.
Sida 124 - It was a barren scene, and wild, Where naked cliffs were rudely piled ; But ever and anon between Lay velvet tufts of loveliest green ; And well the lonely infant knew Recesses where the wall-flower grew, And honey-suckle loved to crawl Up the low crag and ruin'd wall. I deem'd such nooks the sweetest shade The sun in all its round surveyed...
Sida 31 - Sin' my true-love's forsaken me. Old Song. IF I were to choose a spot from which the rising or setting sun could be seen to the greatest possible advantage, it would be that wild path winding around the foot of the high belt of semicircular rocks called Salisbury Crags, and marking the verge of the steep descent which slopes down into the glen on the south-eastern side of the city of Edinburgh.
Sida 341 - A waefu' day it was to me ! For there I lost my father dear, My father dear, and brethren three. * Their winding sheet the bluidy clay, Their graves are growing green to see : And by them lies the dearest lad That ever blest a woman's ee ! Now wae to thee, thou cruel lord, A bluidy man I trow thou be ; For mony a heart thou hast made sair, That ne'er did wrong to thine or thee.

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