The Bishop of Oxford's Charge to the Clergy of His Diocese, at His Triennial Visitation in July, 1719..

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George Mortlock at the Phoenix in St. Paul's Church-yard, 1720 - 24 sidor
 

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Sida 24 - My son, fear thou the LORD and the king : and meddle not with them that are given to change...
Sida 12 - Who art one God, one Lord : not one only Person, but three Persons in one substance. For that which we believe of the glory of the Father, the same we believe of the Son and of the Holy Ghost, without any difference or inequality.
Sida 18 - ... once, to have depraved the faith, whilst her Pastors, and other chief members, were daily suffering martyrdom in its defence: and few there are, or rather none at all, as far as I have been able to observe, who refuse to allow the testimony of the primitive writers its due weight and authority, such only excepted, as have not read them, or are afraid of their evidence, and, therefore, in order to divert us from the true sense of the holy Scriptures, (in discovering which those interpreters have...
Sida 14 - That he alloweth the Book of Articles of Religion agreed upon by the archbishops and bishops of both provinces, and the whole clergy in the convocation holden at London in the year of our Lord God...
Sida 18 - ... them. I speak not of improvements in the liberal arts and sciences ; which had their rise from study and observation, and therefore must be advanced, and perfected in the same method: whereas the Christian Religion having been completely published to the world by our Blessed LORD and His Apostles, no addition can be made to it without a new Revelation. Here, then, is no room for invention or discovery ; but, on the contrary, if any doctrine be new, if it be not truly Primitive and Apostolical,...
Sida 17 - ... even the first Christians endured in the Heathen persecutions. These practices, together with the principles from which they proceed, can hardly be too much detested : but shall we then, instead of reforming these or the like abuses, quite discard that sacred authority which hath been abused ? . . . . But I am in hopes, that in the opinion of every true son of this Church, it will be a sufficient confutation of all innovations, which have been, or hereafter shall be, advanced, to say with St....
Sida 6 - ... hearty concern and just zeal for that spiritual power, which our LORD hath left in His Church. But, instead of this, these men describe the Church, rather as a number of persons disunited from, and independent on one another, than as an orderly society under lawful governors of Divine, or necessary appointment; and thus root up, as far as in them lieth, the very foundation of all Ecclesiastical authority at once. It might easily be shown, how by the schemes lately published, every branch of this...
Sida 18 - Whence our best writers, as well in their controversies with the Papists, as with other sectaries and heretics, constantly appeal to the judgment and practice of the Church, in the next centuries after the Apostles: which as she had better means of information, than can be pretended to in any succeeding age, so cannot reasonably be supposed, either through negligence or design, and this, in all parts of the world at once, to have depraved the faith, whilst her Pastors, and other chief members, were...
Sida 18 - ... information, than can be pretended to in any succeeding age, so cannot reasonably be supposed, either through negligence or design, and this, in all parts of the world at once, to have depraved the faith, whilst her Pastors, and other chief members, were daily suffering martyrdom in its defence: and few there are, or rather none at all, as far as I have been able to observe, who refuse to allow the testimony of the primitive writers its due weight and authority, such only excepted, as have not...
Sida 17 - ... arrogance of some vainglorious philosopher, who by making strange discoveries, and contradicting the rest of the world, seeks to raise in others a great esteem of himself, than of the humility of a good Christian ; whose chief glory consists in the entire resignation of his understanding, and the stedfast belief of all the truths, which GOD hath revealed to him, whether he doth, or doth not, clearly comprehend them. I speak not of improvements in the liberal arts and sciences ; which had their...

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