The Scottish Invention of America, Democracy and Human Rights: A History of Liberty and Freedom from the Ancient Celts to the New Millennium

Framsida
University Press of America, 2004 - 434 sidor
The Scottish Invention of America, Democracy and Human Rights is a history of liberty from 1300 BC to 2004 AD. The book traces the history of the philosophy and fight for freedom from the ancient Celts to the creation of America, asserting the roots of liberty originated in the radical political thought of the ancient Celts, the Scots' struggle for freedom, John Duns Scotus and the Arbroath Declaration (1320), a tradition that influenced Locke and the English Whig theorists as well as our Founding Fathers, particularly Jefferson, Madison, Wilson and Witherspoon. Author Alexander Klieforth argues the Arbroath Declaration (1320) and its philosophy was the intellectual foundation of the American Revolution and Declaration of Independence (1776). Thus, the work is a revolutionary alternative to the traditional Anglocentric view that freedom, democracy and human rights descended only from John Locke and England of the 1600s. The work is the first historical analysis to locate and document the origin of the doctrine of the "consent of the governed" in the medieval scholar, John Duns Scotus (c.1290s), four centuries before Locke and the English Whigs, and in the evolutionary progress of mankind. The work contends that the Arbroath Declaration (1320) and its philosophy was the intellectual foundation of the American Revolution and Declaration of Independence (1776). After showing the Scottish influence on the U.S. Constitution, Bill of Rights, and the new Federal government, the Braudelian-style work traces the development of Scottish-style freedom and human rights through the French Declaration of the Rights of Man and of the Citizen influenced by Jefferson, Lincoln's Gettysburg Address that transformed Jefferson's Declaration, and Eleanor Roosevelt's role in creating the U.N. Universal Declaration of Human Rights, the foundation of the modern human rights struggle. More information about this book is available at the authors website www.braveheartsoul.com.
 

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Innehåll

Chapter 1 Ceud Mille Failte
1
Genesis
5
The Celts The People Who Disappeared Into the Shadows
13
The Blossoming of Celtic Culture
25
The Thistle Takes Root Celtic Scotland
37
Vent Vidi Sed Non Vici
51
The Four Founding Peoples and Their Kingdoms
61
The Celts and Supernatural Life
79
The Scottish Mind of Thomas Jefferson
241
The Drafting of the Declaration of Independence
245
THE TEXT OF THE FIRST PRINTING OF THE DECLARATION OF
251
An Analysis of the Style and Logic of the American Declaration
255
A Comparison of the Arbroath Declaration 1320 and the Declaration of Independence 1776
263
The Scottish Influence on the Constitution the Bill of Rights and the New Federal Government
269
THE TEXT OF THE AMERICAn BILL OF RIGHTS
276
The Controversy The Comparative Influences of the CelticArbroath Philosophy and Scottish Enlightenment Versus English Philosophy and Law on t...
279

The Scandinavians
95
The Forging of a New Nation
107
The Normans
117
The House of Canmore
133
The Fall of the House of Canmore
145
He Who Sows the Wind
155
Shall Reap the Whirlwind
165
Robert the Bruce
171
Medieval Scotland and John Duns Scotus
177
The Declaration of Arbroath
185
THE TEXT OF THE DECLARATION OF ARBROATH IN ENGLISH An English Translation of the original Latin text
190
THE TEXT OF THE DECLARATION OF ARBROATH IN MEDIEVAL LATIN
194
From the Arbroath Declaration to the Scottish Enlightenment
197
The Scottish Enlightenment
213
The Scottish Invention of AmericaThomas Jefferson the Arbroath Declaration and the Declaration of Independence
227
The Scottish Enlightenment in the United States
229
The Age of the Rights of Mankind How the Declaration of 1776 Carried WorldWide the Ideology of 1320 to the New Millennium
293
The Declaration of Independence the French Revolution and the Declaration of the Rights of Man and of the Citizen
297
Abraham Lincolns Transformation of the Declaration of Independence from Freedom and Liberty to Equality
299
THE TEXT OF THE GETTYSBURG ADDRESS
301
The Ideology of 1320 and 1776 and the Global Independence and Human Rights Movements
303
The Scots American and French Declarations and the Third World
309
And We Return to Scotland and England The Scottish Parliament
311
209 Years Later the English the Scots and the Welsh Get an AmericanStyle Bill of Rights
317
Conclusions and the Future
319
American Events
323
End notes
374
Bibliography Further Reading
401
Index
429
About the Authors
Upphovsrätt

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Om författaren (2004)

Alexander Leslie Klieforth received his B.A. and LL.D. degrees from St. Norbert College in Wisconsin, his M.A. from the Fletcher School of Law and Diplomacy, advanced study at the University of Geneva, Switzerland, Louvain, Belgium, and doctoral work at George Washington University, Washington, D.C. As a professional American diplomat, he was stationed in Washington, D.C., Europe, Asia and Latin America and on special assignments in the Middle East and Africa. Robert Munro is the University Law Librarian and Director of CIFCS of the College of Law, University of Florida, Gainesville. He is also Senior Research Fellow and Director of Research for North America of CIDOEC at Jesus College, Cambridge University. He holds a J.D. from the College of Law of the University of Iowa, a Ph.D. from the University of Florida, and has completed further graduate studies at Cambridge University, Oxford University, and the Institute of Advanced Legal Studies of the University of London.

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