Essay on instinct, and its physical and moral relations

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William Phillips, 1824 - 551 sidor
"A concise view of the following argument on instinct and its physical and moral relations was originally community about two years ago. A request was soon made that it might be given to the public. In surveying the diversified classes of phenomena, which are presented to the view in the wide field of Natural History, none appear more interesting than the acts of the Brute creation. It is natural therefore to compare these acts, which have generally been supposed to result from a peculiar principle, named Instinct, with the operations of Human Reason. In so far as illustrations from Natural History were necessary to my purpose, I have not scrupled to avail myself freely of the scientific labours of others--I trust, however, with proper acknowledgments. And, though I consider the speculations in the First Part (physical relations of instinct) as but secondary and introductory to those in the Second (moral relations of instinct), I am aware, that there is a class of readers who will give them the preference. I have therefore studied to make the former more interesting to this class, by a greater number of quotations than I should have otherwise thought necessary"--Book. (PsycINFO Database Record (c) 2012 APA, all rights reserved).

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Sida 166 - Lives thro' all life, extends thro' all extent ; Spreads undivided, operates unspent ; Breathes in our soul, informs our mortal part, As full, as perfect, in a hair as heart ; As full, as perfect, in vile Man that mourns, As the rapt seraph that adores and burns: To him no high, no low, no great, no small; He fills, he bounds, connects, and equals all.
Sida 480 - Let no man deceive himself. If any man among you seemeth to be wise in this world, let him become a fool, that he may be wise.
Sida 481 - Who is a wise man and endued with knowledge among you ? let him shew out of a good conversation his works with meekness of wisdom.
Sida 6 - Knowledge and wisdom, far from being one, Have ofttimes no connection. Knowledge dwells In heads replete with thoughts of other men, Wisdom in minds attentive to their own.
Sida 548 - Not a flower But shows some touch, in freckle, streak, or stain, Of his unrivall'd pencil. He inspires Their balmy odours, and imparts their hues, And bathes their eyes with nectar, and includes, In grains as countless as the seaside sands, The forms with which he sprinkles all the earth.
Sida 480 - And I, brethren, when I came to you, came not with excellency of speech or of wisdom, declaring unto you the testimony of God, for I determined not to know any thing among you, save Jesus Christ, and him crucified.
Sida 543 - What think ye of Christ? whose son is he?" They say unto him, " The son of David." He saith unto them, " How then doth David in spirit call him Lord, saying, The Lord said unto my Lord, Sit thou on my right hand, till I make thine enemies thy footstool ? If David then call him Lord, how is he his son?
Sida 480 - Now we have received, not the spirit of the world, but the spirit which is of God; that we might know the things that are freely given to us of God. Which things also we speak, not in the words which man's wisdom teacheth, but which the Holy Ghost teacheth; comparing spiritual things with spiritual.
Sida 166 - Who taught the nations of the field and wood To shun their poison, and to choose their food ? Prescient, the tides or tempests to withstand, Build on the wave, or arch beneath the sand?
Sida 194 - Some drill and bore The solid earth, and from the strata there Extract a register, by which we learn That he who made it, and reveal'd its date To Moses, was mistaken in its age.

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