Annual Report of the Bureau of American Ethnology to the Secretary of the Smithsonian Institution, Volym 24

Framsida
U.S. Government Printing Office, 1907
"List of publications of the Bureau of American Ethnology (comp. by Frederick Webb Hodge)":
 

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Sidan 519 - ... nearest to, and he loses his throw ; when another steps into his place. This game is a very difficult one to describe, so as to give an exact idea of it, unless one can see it played — it is a game of great beauty and fine bodily exercise, and these people become excessively fascinated with it; often gambling away...
Sidan 243 - They had each a bundle of about fifty small sticks, neatly polished, of the size of a quill, and five inches long: a certain number of these sticks had red lines round them; and as many of these as one of the players might find convenient were curiously rolled up in dry grass, and according to the judgment of his antagonist respecting their number and, marks, he lost or won.
Sidan 607 - ... they could raise their voices; whilst the women of each party, who had their goods at stake, formed into two rows on the line between the two parties of players, and danced also, in...
Sidan 607 - Every weapon, by a rule of all ballplays, is laid by in their respective encampments, and no man allowed to go for one; so that the sudden broils that take place on the ground, are presumed to be as suddenly settled without any probability of much personal injury; and no one is allowed to interfere in any way with the contentious individuals.
Sidan 518 - The game of Tchung-kee, a beautiful athletic exercise, which they seem to be almost unceasingly practicing whilst the weather is fair, and they have nothing else of moment to demand their attention. This game is decidedly their favorite amusement, and is played near to the village on a pavement of clay, which has been used for that purpose until it has become as smooth and hard as a floor. For this game two champions form their respective parties, by choosing alternately the most famous players,...
Sidan 517 - From the first to the second chief's lodge, a distance of about fifty yards, was covered with timber smoothed and joined so as to be as level as the floor of one of our houses, with a battery at the end to stop the rings ; these rings were of clay-stone and flat like the...
Sidan 518 - This game is decidedly their favorite amusement, and is played near to the village on a pavement of clay, which has been used for that purpose until it has become as smooth and hard as a floor. For this game two champions form their respective parties, by choosing alternately the most famous players, until their requisite numbers are made up. Their bettings are then made, and their stakes are held by some of the chiefs or others present. The play commences...
Sidan 544 - Bone-play," is another in-door amusement, so called, because the articles used are made of the hoof-joint bones of the deer. The ends are hollowed out, and from three to ten are strung together. In playing it they use the same kind of sharp stick, the end of which is thrown into the bones. Doubtless the most interesting of all games is the "Maiden's Ball Play," in the Ojibway language, Pah-pah-se-Kah-way.
Sidan xxxiv - Office furniture, appliances, and supplies; (2) field outfits; (3) ethnologic manuscripts and other documents; (4) illustrations — photographs, drawings, etc.; (5) books and periodicals; (6) collections held temporarily by collaborators for use in research; (7) undistributed residue of the editions of Bureau publications. The additions to the office and field property during the year have been few and unimportant, Numerous minor manuscripts have been added, principally in connection with the Dictionary...
Sidan 54 - The players toss up the dice from the basket, letting them drop again into it, and score points according to the way the dice turn up in the basket. The first throw by each player is made from the hand instead of from the basket. One hundred points usually count a game, and stakes are wagered on the result as in almost every other Indian contest of skill or chance. For the purpose of explanation, we shall designate two of the five as "rounds" and the other three as "diamonds...

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