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ART. 3. The contracting parties do hereby agree, promise, and oblige Prisoners to be themselves, reciprocally to deliver up all the prisoners now in their delivered up. hands, (by what means soever the same may have come into their possession,) to the officer commanding at St. Louis, to be by him restored to their respective nations, as soon as it may be practicable.

Art. 4. The contracting parties, in the sincerity of mutual friend- Former treaship, recognize, re-establish, and confirm, all and every treaty, contract. ties recognised and agreement, heretofore concluded between the United States and the

and confirmed. said Iaway tribe or nation,

In witness whereof, the said William Clark, Ninian Edwards, and

Auguste Chouteau, Commissioners as aforesaid, and the aforesaid
King, Chiefs, and Warriors, have hereunto subscribed their names
and affixed their seals, this sixteenth day of September, in the year
of our Lord one thousand eight hundred and fifteen, and of the
independence of the United States the fortieth.

WILLIAM CLARK,
NINIAN EDWARDS,

AUGUSTE CHOUTEAU.
Wyingwaha, or hard heart,

Wohomppee, the broth, Wongehehronyne, or big chief,

Shongatong, the horse jockey, Wonehee, or the slave,

Nahocheininugga, without ears, Hahraga, the forked born,

Conja, the plumb, Eniswabanee, the big axe,

Chahowbrowpa, the dew-lap, Washcommanee, the great marcher, Manuhanu, the great walker, Wyimppishcoonee, the ill-humored Chapee, the pine buffaloe,

Okugwata, the roller, Ranoingga, the little pipe,

Ishtagrasa, grey eyes. Done at Portage des Sioux, in the presence of R. Wash, secretary to the commissinn. D. Bissel, brig. gen. T. Paul, c. C. T. Samuel Brady, lieut. Geo. Fisher, surgeon Illinois regt. P. Chouteau, agent. Jno. W. Johnson, U. 8. factor and I. agent. Samuel Solomon, interpreter. Maurice Blondeaux, agt. Louis Dorion. Dennis Julien. Jas. M.Colloch, capt.

To the Indian names are subjoined a mark and seal.

man,

A TREATY OF PEACE AND FRIENDSHIP,

Made and concluded between Ninian Edwards and Auguste Oct. 28, 1815.

Chouteau, Commissioners Plenipotentiary of the United States Ratified, Doc. of America, on the part and behalf of the said States, of one 26, 1818. part ; and the undersigned Chiefs and Warriors of the Kanzas Tribe of Indians, on the part and behalf of their said Tribe, of the other part.

The parties being desireous of re-establishing peace and friendship between the United States and their said tribe, and of being placed, in all things, and in every respect, upon the same footing upon which they stood before the late war between the United States and Great Britain, have agreed to the following articles :

ARTICLE 1. Every injury or act of hostility by one or either of the Injuries, &c. contracting parties against the other, shall be mutually forgiven and forgiven. forgot.

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ART. 2. There shall be perpetual peace and friendship between all the citizens of the United States of America and all the individuals composeing the said Kanzas tribe, and all the friendly relations that existed between them before the war shall be, and the same are hereby, renewed.

Art. 3. The undersigned chiefs and warriors, for themselves and their said tribe, do hereby acknowledge themselves to be under the protection of the United States of America, and of no other nation, power, or sovereign, whatsoever. In witness whereof, the said Ninian Edwards and Auguste Chouteau,

Commissioners as aforesaid, and the Chiefs aforesaid, have here-
unto subscribed their names and affixed their seals, this twenty-
eighth day of October, in the year of our Lord one thousand eight
hundred and fifteen and of the independence of the United States
the fortieth.

NINIAN EDWARDS,
AUGUSTE CHOUTEAU.

Cayezettanzaw, or the big chief,

Egashabe,
Niedapy,

Kaehamony, or the floating down stream,
Hazeware, or the buck elk running after Opasheega,
the doo,

Karabsheengaw, or the little crow,
Wabangasby, or the endless,

Metanegaw, or the foolish robe,
Cayegasheengaw, or the little chief, Wehurasudge, or the red eagle,
Manshonskaw, or the white plume, Necolebran, or he who can smell a man,
Cayegettsagesbeengaw, or the old chief, Mannanedge,
Mocupamawny, or the walking cloud, Watankegaw,
Washangare,

Taritchu, or the cow's rib.
Done in St. Louis, in presence of R. Wash, Secretary to the Commission. T.
Paul, C. T. of the C. Ja. Kennerly, C. I. dept. Christian Witt. Gabriel 8. Chou.
teau, ensign M. M. G. H. Kennerly. Thomas Forsyth, I. agent. Taylor Berry.
Antoine Barada, Paul Desjardins, Interpreters.

To the Indian names are subjoined a mark and seal

ARTICLES OF A TREATY

March 22, 1816. Made and concluded at the City of Washington, on the twentyRatified, April

second day of March, one thousand eight hundred and sixteen, 8, 1816.

between George Graham, being specially authorized by the President of the United States thereto, and the undersigned Chiefs and Headmen of the Cherokee Nation, duly authorized and empowered by the said Nation.

Cession by

ARTICLE 1. Whereas the Executive of the State of South Carolina Cherokees to has made an application to the President of the United States to extin

guish the claim of the Cherokee nation to that part of their lands wbich lye within the boundaries of the said State, as lately established and agreed upon between that State and the State of North Carolina; and as the Cherokee nation is disposed to comply with the wishes of their brothers of South Carolina, they have agreed and do hereby agree to

cede to the State of South Carolina, and forever quit claim to, the tract Bounds of the of country contained within the following bounds, viz. : beginning on cession. the east bank of the Chattuga river, where the boundary line of the

Cherokee nation crosses the same, running thence, with the said boundary line, to a rock on the Blue Ridge, where the boundary line crosses the same, and which rock has been lately established as a corner to the States of North and South Carolina; running thence, south, sixty-eight and a quarter degrees west, twenty miles and thirty-two chains, to a rock on the Chattuga river at the thirty-fifth degree of north latitude, another corner of the boundaries agreed upon by the States of North and South Carolina; thence, down and with the Chattuga, to the beginning.

ART. 2. For and in consideration of the above cession, the United U.S. engage States promise and engage that the State of South Carolina shall pay to for the payment

of 85000 by the Cherokee nation, or its accredited agent, the sum of five thousand South Carolina. dollars, within ninety days after the President and Senate shall have ratified this treaty : Provided, That the Cherokee nation shall have Proviso. sanctioned the same in Council: And provided also, That the Executive of the State of South Carolina shall approve of the stipulations contained in this article.

In testimony whereof, the said Commissioner, and the undersigned

Chiefs and Headmen of the Cherokee Nation, have hereunto set
their hands and seals.

GEORGE GRAHAM.
Colonel John Lowry,

Richard Taylor,
Major John Walker,

John Ross,
Major Ridge,

Choucunsene.
WITNESSES PRESENT AT SIGNING AND SEALING :—Return J. Meigs, Jacob Laub,
Gid: Davis.

To the Indian names are subjoined a mark and seal.

ARTICLES OF A CONVENTION Made and entered into between George Graham, specially au- March 22, 1816.

thorized thereto by the President of the United States, and the Racifie undersigned Chiefs and Headmen of the Cherokee Nation, duly 8, 1816. authorized and empowered by the said Nation.

ARTICLE 1. Whereas doubts have existed in relation to the northern Donbts about boundary of that part of the Creek lands lying west of the Coosa river, boundary. and which were ceded to the United States by the treaty held at Fort Jackson, on the ninth day of August, one thousand eight hundred and fourteen; and whereas, by the third article of the Treaty, dated the seventh of January, one thousand eight hundred and six, between the United States and the Cherokee nation, the United States have recognised a claim on the part of the Cherokee nation to the lands south of the Big Bend of the Tennessee river, and extending as far west as a place on the waters of Bear Creek, [a branch of the Tennessee river,] known by the name of the Flat Rock, or Stone; it is, therefore, now Boundary line declared and agreed, that a line shall be run from a point on the west designated and bank of the Coosa river, opposite to the lower end of the Ten Islands establi in said river, and above Fort Strother, directly to the Flat Rock or Stone, on Bear creek, [a branch of the Tennessee river;] which line shall be established as the boundary of the lands ceded by the Creek Dation to the United States by the treaty held at Fort Jackson, on the ninth day of August, one thousand eight hundred and fourteen, and of the lands claimed by the Cherokee nation lying west of the Coosa and south of the Tennessee rivers.

U. S. to have ART. 2. It is expressly agreed on the part of the Cherokee nation the right of that the United States shall have the right to lay off, open, and have the opening and

Sads, &c. free use of, such road or roads, through any part of the Cherokee nation, in the Cherokee lying north of the boundary line now established, as may be deemed nation.

necessary for the free intercourse between the States of Tennessee and Georgia and the Mississippi Territory. And the citizens of the United

States shall freely navigate and use, as a highway, all the rivers and Cherokees to waters within the Cherokee nation. The Cherokee nation further agree keep up public to establish and keep up, on the roads to be opened under the sanction houses, &c.

of this article, such ferries and public houses as may be necessary for

the accommodation of the citizens of the United States. Commission. Art. 3. In order to preclude any dispute hereafter, relative to the ers to run the boundary line now established, it is hereby agreed that the Cherokee boundary line.

nation shall appoint two commissioners to accompany the commissioners already appointed on the part of the United States, to run the boundary lines of the lands ceded by the Creek nation to the United States, while they are engaged in running that part of the boundary established by

the first article of this treaty. Commissioner ART. 4. In order to avoid unnecessary expense and delay, it is further to lay off roads. agreed that, whenever the President of the United States may deem it

expedient to open a road through any part of the Cherokee nation, in pursuance of the stipulations of the second article of this Convention, the principal chief of the Cherokee nation shall appoint one commis

sioner to accompany the commissioners appointed by the President of To be paid by the United States, to lay off and mark the road; and the said commis the U. s.

sioner shall be paid by the United States. Indemnity to ART. 5. The United States agree to indemnify the individuals of the Cherokees. Cherokee nation for losses sustained by them in consequence of the

march of the militia and other troops in the service of the United States through that nation; which losses have been ascertained by the agents of the United States to amount to twenty-five thousand five hundred dollars.

In testimony whereof the said Commissioner, and the undersigned

Chiefs and Headmen of the Cherokee Nation, have hereunto set their hands and seals. Done at the City of Washington, this twenty-second day of March, one thousand eight hundred and sixteen.

GEORGE GRAHAM.

Colonel John Lowry,

Richard Taylor,
Major John Walker,

John Ross,
Major Ridge,

Cheucunsene.
WITNESSES PRESENT AT SIONING AND SEALING,—Return J. Meigs, Jacob Laub,
Gid: Davis.

To the Indian names are subjoined a mark and soal.

A TREATY OF PEACE AND FRIENDSHIP

Made and concluded between William Clark, Ninian Edwards, May 13, 1816. and Auguste Chouteau, commissioners plenipotentiary of the p.

Proclamation, United States of America, on the part and behalf of the said Dec. 30, 1816. states, of the one part, and the undersigned chiefs and warriors of the Sacs of Rock river and the adjacent country, of the other part.

Preamble.

Whereas by the ninth article of the treaty of peace, which was concluded on the twenty-fourth day of December, eighteen hundred and fourteen, between the United States and Great Britain, at Ghent, and which was ratified by the president, with the advice and consent of the senate, on the seventeenth day of February, eighteen hundred and fifteen, it was stipulated that the said parties should severally put an end to all hostilities with the Indian tribes, with whom they might be at war, at the time of the ratification of said treaty; and to place the said tribes inhabiting their respective territories, on the same footing upon which they stood before the war: Provided, they should agree to desist from all hostilities against the said parties, their citizens or subjects respectively, upon the ratification of the said treaty being notified to them, and should so desist accordingly.

And whereas the United States being determined to execute every article of the treaty with perfect good faith, and wishing to be particularly exact in the execution of the article above alluded to, relating to the Indian tribes : The president, in consequence thereof, for that purpose, on the eleventh day of March, eighteen hundred and fifteen, appointed the undersigned William Clark, governor of Missouri territory, Ninian Edwards, governor of Illinois territory, and Auguste Chouteau, esq. of the Missouri territory, commissioners, with full power to conclude a treaty of peace and amity with all those tribes of Indians, conformably to the stipulations contained in the said article, on the part of the United States, in relation to such tribes.

And whereas the commissioners, in conformity with their instructions in the early part of last year, notified the Sacs of Rock river, and the adjacent country, of the time of the ratification of said treaty; of the stipulations it contained in relation to them; of the disposition of the American government to fulfil those stipulations, by entering into a treaty with them, conformably thereto; and invited the said Sacs of Rock river, and the adjacent country, to send forward a deputation of their chiefs to meet the said commissioners at Portage des Sioux, for the purpose of concluding such a treaty as aforesaid, between the United States and the said Indians, and the said Sacs of Rock river, and the adjacent country, having not only declined that friendly overture, but having continued their hostilities, and committed many depredations thereafter, which would have justified the infliction of the severest chastisement upon them; but having earnestly repented of their conduct, now imploring mercy, and being anxious to return to the habits of peace and friendship with the United States; and the latter being always disposed to pursue the most liberal and humane policy towards the Indian tribes within their territory, preferring their reclamation by peaceful measures, to their punishment, by the application of the military force of the nation — Now, therefore,

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