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THE

LADY OF GLYNNE.

BY

THE AUTHOR

OF

"MARGARET AND HER BRIDESMAIDS."

• What shall I do to gain eternal life?

Discharge aright
The simple dues with which each day is rife ;

Yea, with thy might.
Ere perfect scheme of action thou devise

Will life be filed,
While he who ever acts as conscience cries
Shall live, though dead."

TRANSLATION OF SCHILLER.

IN THREE VOLUMES.

VOL. III.

LONDON:
HURST AND BLACKETT, PUBLISHERS,
SUCCESSORS TO HENRY COLBURN,
13, GREAT MARLBOROUGH STREET.

1857.
(The right of Translation is reserved.]

249. 2. 28.

2

THE LADY OF GLYNNE,

CHAPTER I.

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Time hath, my lord, a wallet on his back,
Wherein he puts alms for oblivion.”

PERHAPS a minute elapsed.
Then he said, in the same calm voice,

“I know not what arrangement you have made about my boy with his mother, I hardly think she is aware who is her guest."

" It was yesterday, only yesterday that I discovered it. I thought it better to wait, to see

you."

“ You judged rightly, kindly. My boy is not a philosopher yet. He will have to rough

VOL. III.

B

it in the world ere he takes a sudden parting calmly.”

Oh, Glynne, how cuttingly you said that, yet how instantly you saw my position, and helped me out of it!

"I cannot withhold from you, at the risk, though, of being considered impertinent, how grateful I am for the love and care you have bestowed on my boy, and all for his own sake, too, little spoilt animal. I was not aware, of course, to whom I was indebted, but allow me to say this is the first time I ever returned after an absence, that I have not had cause to regret leaving him. He would have mourned terribly, had

you left him yesterday. I thank you from

my heart.

Though every word was as darts of flame scorching me, with ruddy, glancing tongues, though I shrunk and shivered with strange mortification, and feelings I disliked and hated, yet could not define them, or struggle out of the misery they gave me, yet my woman's nature recoiled from showing any more emotion than himself.

I said calmly,

once

more

to you

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“I have been living with Doctor Blaize, an old friend of my father's, for the last two years ; and when he died, I accepted a situation as nursery-governess in the south, preparatory to asking to be restored all.”

“I believe your re-appearance will cause great joy. I will take upon myself to tell Selina; her health is delicate. She mourned for you." If I had thought or paused, all my

fortitude would have given way. So I continued

I used to see your boy on the sands at Brighton : his nurses were not good. We became acquainted, and play-fellows. I know nothing more than that his mother came for me suddenly, and took me away with her. I was the more content to go, and less curious as to her name, because I recognised her, and hoped I had greater chance of meeting with some of you, through her means, than by staying with Mrs. Hall.”

Glynne bowed his old haughty mocking bow.

I drew myself up also, and said, “I presume I had better go to the Lady,' and say I must leave her.”

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