Reliques of Ancient English Poetry: Consisting of Old Heroic Ballads, Songs, and Other Pieces of Our Earlier Poets, Together with Some of Later Date, Volym 1

Framsida
G. Bell, 1876
0 Recensioner
Recensionerna verifieras inte, men Google söker efter och tar bort falskt innehåll när det upptäcks

Från bokens innehåll

Så tycker andra - Skriv en recension

Vi kunde inte hitta några recensioner.

Utvalda sidor

Innehåll

On the word Termagant
53
A Scottish Ballad 7 Sir Patrick Spence
54
Robin Hood and Guy of Gisborne
56
BOOK THE SECOND
62
CONTAINING BALLADS THAT ILLUSTRATE SHAKSPEARE
88
BOOK THE FIFTH
93
PAGE
98
Adam Bell Clym o the Clough and William of Cloudesly 2 The Aged Lover renounceth Love 3 Jephthah Judge of Israel
130
A Robyn Jolly Robyn
133
A Song to the Lute in Musicke
134
King Cophetua and the BeggarMaid
135
Take thy Old Cloak about thee
139
Willow Willow Willow
142
Sir Lancelot du Lake
146
Corydons Farewell to Phillis
150
Gernutus the Jew of Venice
151
The Passionate Shepherd to his Love by Marlow
158
The Nymphs Reply by Sir W Raleigh
160
Titus Andronicuss Complaint
161
Take those Lips away
166
King Leir and his Three Daughters
167
Youth and Age by Shakspeare
172
The Frolicksome Duke or the Tinkers good Fortune
173
The Friar of Orders Gray
176
PAGE
180
Illustration of the Northern Names
191
Deaths final Conquest by James Shirley
192
The Rising in the North
193
Northumberland betrayed by Douglas
200
My Mind to me a Kingdom is
208
The Patient Countess by W Warner
210
Dowsabell by Drayton
216
The Farewell to Love from Beaumont and Fletcher
221
Cupids Pastime by Davison
224
The Character of a Happy Life by Sir H Wotton
226
Gilderoy A Scottish Ballad
227
Winifreda
230
The Witch of Wokey
231
Bryan and Pereene A West India Ballad by Dr Grainger
234
Gentle River Gentle River Translated from the Spanish
236
Alcanzar and Zayda A Moorish Tale
242
Richard of Almaigne
246
On the death of K Edward I
249

Andra upplagor - Visa alla

Vanliga ord och fraser

Populära avsnitt

Sida 158 - The shepherd swains shall dance and sing For thy delight each May morning: If these delights thy mind may move, Then live with me and be my love.
Sida 158 - A belt of straw and ivy buds With coral clasps and amber studs : And if these pleasures may thee move, Come live with me and be my Love.
Sida 159 - A honey tongue, a heart of gall, Is fancy's spring, but sorrow's fall. Thy gowns, thy shoes, thy beds of roses, Thy cap, thy kirtle, and thy posies, Soon break, soon wither, soon forgotten ; In folly ripe, in reason rotten. Thy belt of straw, and ivy buds, Thy coral clasps, and amber studs, All these in me no means can move To come to thee, and be thy love.
Sida 224 - Who God doth late and early pray, More of his grace than gifts to lend, And entertains the harmless day, With a religious book or friend. This man is freed from servile bands Of hope to rise, or fear to fall ; Lord of himself, though not of lands, And having nothing, yet hath all.
Sida viii - The first time, too, I could scrape a few shillings together, which were not common occurrences with me, I bought unto myself a copy of these beloved volumes ; nor do I believe I ever read a book half so frequently, or with half the enthusiasm.
Sida 171 - Crabbed age and youth Cannot live together ; Youth is full of pleasance, Age is full of care: Youth like summer morn, Age like winter weather ; Youth like summer brave, Age like winter bare. Youth is full of sport, Age's breath is short, Youth is nimble, age is lame : Youth is hot and bold, Age is weak and cold ; Youth is wild, and age is tame.
Sida 206 - Content I live, this is my stay; I seek no more than may suffice; I press to bear no haughty sway; Look, what I lack my mind supplies. Lo, thus I triumph like a king, Content with that my mind doth bring.
Sida 140 - My mother had a maid call'd Barbara : She was in love ; and he she lov'd prov'd mad, And did forsake her : she had a song of " willow ;" An old thing 'twas, but it express'd her fortune, And she died singing it...
Sida 191 - Some men with swords may reap the field, And plant fresh laurels where they kill: But their strong nerves at last must yield; They tame but one another still: Early or late They stoop to fate, And must give up their murmuring breath, When they, pale captives, creep to death. The garlands wither on your brow, Then boast no more your mighty deeds; Upon Death's purple altar now See, where the victor-victim bleeds: Your heads must come To the cold tomb; Only the actions of the just Smell sweet, and blossom...
Sida 190 - The glories of our blood and state Are shadows, not substantial things ; There is no armour against fate ; Death lays his icy hand on kings : Sceptre and crown Must tumble down, And in the dust be equal made With the poor crooked scythe and spade.

Bibliografisk information