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And make their bed with thee. As the long train
Of ages glide away, the sons of men,
The youth in life's green spring, and he who goes
In the full strength of years, matron, and maid,
The bowed with age, the infant in the smiles
And beauty of its innocent age cut off, -
Shall, one by one, be gathered to thy side,
By those who in their turn shall follow them.

So live, that, when thy summons comes to join
The innumerable caravan, that moves
To that mysterious realm where each shall take
His chamber in the silent halls of death,
Thou go not, like the quarry-slave, at night,
Scourged to his dungeon; but, sustained and soothed
By an unfaltering trust, approach thy grave,
Like one who wraps the drapery of his couch
About him, and lies down to pleasant dreams.

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EXERCISE XLIII.

Miscellaneous Sentences.

1 2 3

4

The more we possess, the more we desire.
He was offered three thousand dollars.
Hard by a cottage chimney smokes
From betwixt two aged oaks.
Sweet and beautiful it is to die for our country.
He acted during the day as President.
And from before the brightness of her face,
White break the clouds away.
Sweet is the coming on of evening mild.
What! can ye lull the winged winds asleep?
This circumstance makes him doubly in fault.

6 10

7 8 9

it is given.

He went almost to Philadelphia.
The string let fly,

11 Twanged short and sharp, like the shrill swallow's cry. He, being a worthy man, was promoted.

12 Man shall not live by bread alone.

13 He remained in London almost a year.

14 Not a cent was contributed.

15 Say, first, of God above, or man below,

16 What can we reason but from what we know? All men cannot receive this saying, save they to whom

17 Oh that I had wings like a dove!

18 All are but parts of one stupendous whole.

19 Thus shall mankind his guardian care engage,

20 The promised father of the future age. Lambeth is over against Westminister Abbey.

21 There's nothing bright, above, below,

22 From flowers that bloom, to stars that glow, But in its light my soul can see Some feature of the Deity! Where thy true treasure ? Gold says, “ Not in me;" And, “ Not in me," the diamond. Gold is poor.

23 The articles were purchased at the following prices,

namely, Love, and love only, is the loan for love.

25 Generally speaking, the examination was satisfactory. 26 All nature is but art unknown to thee.

27 For who but He who arched the skies,

28 Could raise the daisy's purple bud ? Whether he is rich or poor, makes little difference. 29 This did not prevent John's being acknowledged and 30

solemnly inaugurated Duke of Normandy. Delightful task! to rear the tender thought,

31 To teach the young idea how to shoot, And pour the fresh instruction o'er the mind.

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43

I will not let thee go, except thou bless me.

32 And the air grew hot and thick.

33 The seat of a member was disputed, which occasioned 34

a long and sharp debate.
He woke to hear his sentry's shriek,-
To arms! They come! The Greek! The Greek !
All around me is thick darkness.

36 All creatures else forget their daily care,

37 And sleep, the common gift of nature, share. There must be, somewhere, such a rank as man. 38 Let such as hear take heed.

39 Call imperfection what thou fanciest such.

40 And treat this passion more as friend than foe.

41 The chain holds on, and where it ends unknown. 42 Night shades the groves, and all in silence lie, All save the mournful Philomel and I. Every blade of grass, and every flower,

44 And every bud and blossom of the spring, Is the memorial that nature rears Over a kindred grave. He is far from home. He went up over the hill.

46 Well! I will take the subject into consideration. 47 I will contribute, provided the object is worthy.

48 Seeing that ye look for such things, be diligent.

49 Let thy mercy,

O Lord I be upon us, according as we 50 hope in thee. Turn we a moment fancy's rapid flight.

51 What is reason ? Be she thus defined:

52 Reason is upright stature in the soul. Fall he that must, and live the rest.

53 From the centre all round to the sea.

54 I am lord of the fowl and the brute. Be earth with all her scenes withdrawn;

55 Let noise and vanity be gone.

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To whom thus Michael Doubt not but that sin
Will reign among them, as of thee begot.

'Tis as the general pulse
Of life stood still, and Nature made a pause.
O wretched we! why were we hurried down
This lubric and adulterate age ?

To bow and sue for grace
With suppliant knee, and deify His power
Who from the terror of his arm so late
Doubted his empire; that were low indeed.
Up, up, Glentarkin! rouse thee, ho!
Come and trip it as you go
On the light fantastic toe.
He made no proposition whatever.
To do aught good never will be our task,
But ever to do ill our sole delight,
As being the contrary to His will
Whom we resiste

We took our seats
By many a cottage hearth, where he received
The welcome of an inmate come from far.
His

spear (to equal which the tallest pine
Hewn on Norwegian hills, to be the mast
Of some great admiral, were but a wand)
He walked with to support uneasy steps.
That shining shield invites the tyrant's spear,
As if to damp our elevated aims.

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