The Elementary Forms of the Religious Life

Framsida
Allen and Unwin, 1976 - 456 sidor
1 Recension
In The Elementary Forms of Religious Life (1912), Emile Durkheim sets himself the task of discovering the enduring source of human social identity. He investigates what he considered to be the simplest form of documented religion - totemism among the Aborigines of Australia. For Durkheim, studying Aboriginal religion was a way 'to yield an understanding of the religious nature of man, by showing us an essential and permanent aspect of humanity'. The need and capacity of men and women to relate to one another socially lies at the heart of Durkheim's exploration, in which religion embodies the beliefs that shape our moral universe.The Elementary Forms has been applauded and debated by sociologists, anthropologists, ethnographers, philosophers, and theologians, and continues to speak to new generations about the intriguing origin and nature of religion and society. This new, lightly abridged edition provides an excellent introduction to Durkheim's ideas.

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Om författaren (1976)

Emile Durkheim, French sociologist, is, with Max Weber, one of the two principal founders of modern sociology. Durkheim became a professor of sociology at the Sorbonne, where he founded and edited the very important journal L'Annee Sociologique. He is renowned for the breadth of his scholarship; for his studies of primitive religion; for creating the concept of anomie (normlessness); for his study of the division of labor; and for his insistence that sociologists must use sociological (e.g., rates of behavior) rather than psychological data. His Suicide (1897) is a major sociological classic that is still read today, not so much for its data, which are limited and out of date, but for the brilliance of his analysis of suicide rates and other data that had been initially obtained for administrative rather than scientific purposes. Durkheim's notion of community, his view that religion forms the basis of all societies, had a profound impact on the course of community studies. His work continues to influence new generations of sociologists.

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