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op hexe who addressed themselves only or chiefly ste first of these powers, overlooking the im| price of the two other elements of human

zure, which must continue to exert an everlasting Khence so long as the world endures.

* A writer in one of the daily papers has said he ng a politics a republican. I know of no ground in his opinion ; if there be any, it must have trace to an early period of his life. He may s approved of it

, in theory, while surrounded prve more or less arbitrary, from the form of

Gremment existing in his native country; he

tuting any other. These he thought more debased
than the most bigotted Hindu, and their principles
the bane of all morality.

“ This strong aversion to infidelity was by no
means diminished during his visit to England and
France; on the contrary, the more he mingled with
society in Europe, the more strongly he became
persuaded that religious belief is the only sure
ground-work of virtue. "If I were to settle with
my family in Europe,' he used to say, “I would
never introduce them to any but religious persons,
and from amongst them only would I select my
friends; amongst them I find such kindness and
friendship, that I feel as if surrounded by my own
kindred.'

He evidently now began to suspect that the Unitarian form of Christianity was too much rationalized (or sophisticated, perhaps I may say,) to be suitable to human nature. He remarked in the Unitarians a want of that fervour of zeal and devotion found among other sects, and felt doubts whether a system appealing to reason only was calculated to produce a permanent influence on mankind. He perceived the same defect in the Utilitarian philosophy, and ridiculed the notion that man, a being governed by three powers-reason, imagination, and the passions-could be directed

have deemed a republic good in America, but x thought the rule of the citizen-King the best septed for France, and in the same manner estily rejoiced in the establishment of the throne i Ing Leopold in Belgium. Though a decided

immer, he was generally a moderate one. For

s own country, he did not propose even an Indian uplative council

, like Mr. Rickards; he deemed de Baglish more capable of governing his countryta rell, than the natives themselves. A reference

si measures of internal policy to a few of the most

bistinguished individuals in the European and

Native community, for their suggestions, previous

to such measures being carried into a law, was the uimost be asked in the present state of the Indian

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by those who addressed themselves only or chiefly to the first of these powers, overlooking the importance of the two other elements of human nature, which must continue to exert an everlasting influence so long as the world endures.

“A writer in one of the daily papers has said he was in politics a republican. I know of no ground for this opinion ; if there be any, it must have reference to an early period of his life. He may have approved of it, in theory, while surrounded by power more or less arbitrary, from the form of Government existing in his native country; he may have deemed a republic good in America, but he thought the rule of the citizen-King the best adapted for France, and in the same manner heartily rejoiced in the establishment of the throne of King Leopold in Belgium. Though a decided reformer, he was generally a moderate one. For his own country, he did not propose even an Indian legislative council, like Mr. Rickards; he deemed the English more capable of governing his countrymen well, than the natives themselves. A reference of measures of internal policy to a few of the most distinguished individuals in the European and Native community, for their suggestions, previous to such measures being carried into a law, was the utmost be asked in the present state of the Indian

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by him beforehand. How much of his reputation, as an elegant writer, may therefore be attributable to others, both here and in India, can only be conjectured. As he was exceedingly ambitious of literary fame, he took care, both in Europe and in India, to obtain the best assistance he could get, both European and native. His works, therefore, do not furnish an absolute criterion of his literary talents, although these were no doubt considerable.

Perhaps, we cannot do better than, distrusting our own means of observation and judgment

, lay before the reader the following sketch of his character in England, by a gentleman* who was in close and intimate communication with him here, and whose impartiality cannot be suspected, though he does not deal in that general strain of panegyric, which either elevates the man above the standard of humanity, or leaves the outline vague and indistinct

After observing that much obscurity had been thrown on the history of Ram Mohun Roy by those who wish to give the sanction of his name to their own peculiar opinions and doctrines, he goes on to remark:

“ Some have said he was a Hindu, others a Christian; some that he was a Unitarian, and others

that he was attached to the forms of the Church of England. Some have asserted that he was a re publican; others that he was an admirer of a citizenKing. His different biographers have thus made is real opinions a riddle; those who knew him better, seem not much disposed to clear up the mystery. The fact is, that in religion it is much

say what he was not than what he was. He did not believe in the doctrines of Hinduism, or did he respect its practices : at the same time, be carefully avoided any open and flagrant violation d them, which might have shocked the feelings of bis countrymen. He did not believe in the Trinity, pt he regularly attended the places of worship where that doctrine is inculcated. He wrote books 2 support of the unity of God a doctrine which

Christians hold in common with the Hindu Vedan

fix the Jews, and Musulmans. In short, he bebead in the Deity, and had a strong sentiment of natural religion, which increased with his years, nd, towards the close of his life, was often expressed with all the fervour of genuine piety. He bad always cherished, and the longer he lived became more confirmed in, the opinion, that religion 1 essentially and indispensably necessary to the

* The late Mr. Sandford Arnot is here referred to.

welfare of mankind. As to the rest, he estimated the different systems of religion existing in the

that he was attached to the forms of the Church of England. Some have asserted that he was a republican; others that he was an admirer of a citizenKing. His different biographers have thus made his real opinions a riddle; those who knew him better, seem not much disposed to clear up the mystery. The fact is, that in religion it is much easier to say what he was not than what he was. He did not believe in the doctrines of Hinduism, nor did he respect its practices : at the same time, he carefully avoided any open and flagrant violation of them, which might have shocked the feelings of his countrymen. He did not believe in the Trinity, yet he regularly attended the places of worship where that doctrine is inculcated. He wrote books in support of the unity of God-a doctrine which Christians hold in common with the Hindu Vedantís, the Jews, and Musulmans. In short, he believed in the Deity, and had a strong sentiment of natural religion, which increased with his

years, and, towards the close of his life, was often expressed with all the fervour of genuine piety. He had always cherished, and the longer he lived became more confirmed in, the opinion, that religion is essentially and indispensably necessary to the welfare of mankind. As to the rest, he estimated the different systems of religion existing in the

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t only always contended, at
us, for the necessity of con
r at least forty or fifty years

of the people themselves,
against the proposals of his
r exchanging the East India
olonial form of Government
at in all matters connected
ad found, from long ober
ster was absolute, and the

of Commons subservient;
persons there who had any
art the Government in re
encies of the British crown.
as, therefore, in his estima
nited Government, present-

checks on any abuse of its
espotism.
thusiastic advocate of the
m his arrival in Europe
rance, in the autumn of
at he imbibed some fresh
and his subjects, or that
Parliament disappointed
some personal disgust at

most probable of the
terly opposed to it

. He

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