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Æt. 26.

LARA AND JACQUELINE.

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TO MR. MURRAY.

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LETTER 186.

TO MR. ROGERS.

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nevertheless,) were mere segments of the printer, and nearly ready for publication.
circle. Ma’mselle danced a Russ saraband | He had, before I left town, repeated to me,
with great vigour, grace, and expression. as we were on our way to some evening

Ever, &c.” | party, the first one hundred and twenty

lines of the poem, which he had written the

day before, — at the same time giving me a “ June 21. 1814. general sketch of the characters and the

story.
“I suppose · Lara' is gone to the devil, -

His short notes to Mr. Murray, during
which is no great matter, only let me know, the printing of this work, are of the same
that I may be saved the trouble of copying impatient and whimsical character as those,
the rest, and put the first part into the fire of which I have already given specimens,
I really have no anxiety about it, and shall
not be sorry to be saved the copying, which but, as matter of more interest now presses

in my account of his preceding publications :
goes on very slowly, and may prove to you upon us, I shall forbear from transcribing
that you may speak out - or I should be them at length. In one of them he says,

"I less sluggish.

“Yours, &c.”

have just corrected some of the most
horrible blunders that ever crept into a

proof:"— in another, “I hope the next

“ June 27. 1814. proof will be better ; this was one which “You could not have made me a more

would have consoled Job, if it had been of

a third contains
acceptable present than Jacqueline, — she his “enemy's book :">
is all grace and softness, and poetry'; there only the following words : “ Dear sir, you
is so much of the last, that we do not feel demanded more battle -- there it is. Yours,
the want of story, which is simple, yet

&c.”
enough. I wonder that you do not oftener
unbend to more of the same kind. I have

The two letters that immediately follow
some sympathy with the softer affections,

were addressed to me, at this time, in

town.
though very little in my way, and no one
can depict them so truly and successfully as
yourself

. I have half a mind to pay you in
kind, or rather unkind, for I have just
supped full of horror' in two cantos of

“ July 8. 1814. darkness and dismay.

“I returned to town last night, and had
“Do you go to Lord Essex's to-night? some hopes of seeing you to-day, and would
if will

you let me call for you at your have called, -- but I have been (though in
own hour? I dined with Holland-house exceeding distempered good health) a little
yesterday at Lord Cowper’s ; my Lady very head-achy with free living, as it is called,
gracious, which she can be more than any and am now at the freezing point of return-
one when she likes. I was not sorry to seeing soberness. Of course, I should be sorry
them again, for I can't forget that they have that our parallel lines did not deviate into
been
very

intersection before you return to the coun-
“Ever yours most truly, try, - after that same nonsuit', whereof the

* Bn.
papers

have told us, — but, as you must be
.“ P.S. - Is there any chance or possibility much occupied, I won't be affronted, should
of making it up with Lord Carlisle, as I feel your time and business militate against our
disposed to do any thing reasonable or

meeting. unreasonable to effect it? I would before,

“ Rogers and I have almost coalesced into but for the ‘Courier,' and the possible mis

a joint invasion of the public. Whether it constructions at such a time. Perpend,

will take place or not, I do not yet know,
pronounce."

and I am afraid Jacqueline (which is very
beautiful) will be in bad company.' But in

this case, the lady will not be the sufferer.
On my return to London, for a short
time, at the beginning of July, I found his Scotland ; and I have been doing nothing,

"I am going to the sea, and then to poem of 'Lara, which he had begun at

that is, no good, — and am very truly, &c.” the latter end of May, in the hands of the

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LETTER 187.

TO MR. MOORE.

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LETTER 188.

TO MR. MOORE.

LETTER 189.

TO MR. MURRAY.

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me, &c.”

I suppose, by your non-appearance, that

July 23. 1814. the philasophy of my note, and the previous silence of the writer, have put or kept you

“I am sorry to say that the print is by in humeur. Never mind — it is hardly

no means approved of by those who have worth while.

seen it, who are pretty conversant with the “ This day have I received information original, as well as the picture from whence from my man of law of the non- and it is taken. I rather suspect that it is from never likely to be - performance of pur- in this dilemma would recommend a sus

the

copy, and not the exhibited portrait, and chase by Mr. Claughton, of impecuniary pension, if not an abandonment

, of the prememory. He don't know what to do, or when to pay ; and so all my hopes and fi:rion to the volumes which you purpose inworldly projects and prospects are gone

Alicting upon the public. to

* With regard to Lara, don't be in any the devil. He (the purchaser, and the devil too, for aught I care), and I, and my legal the subject, nor know what to think or do

hurry. I have not yet made up my mind on advisers, are to meet to-morrow, the said till I hear from you ; and Mr. Moore appurchaser having first taken special care to peared to me in a similar state of indeterinquire • whether I would meet him with

mination. I do not know that it may not temper?' — Certainly. The question is this, I shall either have the estate back, lication you proposed, and not adventure in

be better to reserve it for the entire pubwhich is as good as ruin, or I shall go on with him dawdling, which is rather worse.

hardy singleness, or even backed by the I have brought my pigs to a Mussulman all kinds of doubts, &c. &c. since I left

fairy Jacqueline. I have been seized with market. If I had' but a wife now, and

London. children, of whose paternity I entertained doubts, I should be happy, or rather fortu

* Pray let me hear from you, and believe nate, as Candide or Scarmentado.

In the mean time, if you don't come and see me, I shall think that Sam.'s bank is broke too; and that you, having assets there, are de

“July 24. 1814. spairing of more than a piastre in the pound for your dividend. Ever, &c.”

“ The minority must, in this case, carry it

, so pray let it be so, for I don't care sixpence for

of the opinions you mention, on such a subject : 'and P* * (Phillips] " July 18. 1814.

must be a dunce to agree with them. For You shall have one of the pictures. I my own part, I have no objection at all ; wish you to send the proof of 'Lara' to Mr. but Mrs. Leigh and my cousin must be betMoore, 33. Bury Street, to-night, as he leaves ter judges of the likeness than others; and town to-morrow, and wishes to see it before they hate it ; and so I won't have it at he goes'; and I am also willing to have all. the benefit of his remarks. Yours, &c.”

“ Mr. Hobhouse is right as for his conclusion : but I deny the premises. The

name only is Spanish ; the country is not

July 18. 1814. Spain, but the Morea. “ I think you will be satisfied even to re- “Waverley is the best and most interesting pletion with our northern friends ?, and I novel I have redde since I don't know won't deprive you longer of what I think when. I like it as much as I hate . Patronwill give you pleasure ; for my own part, age, and the Wanderer,' and 'O'Donnell

,

and all the feminine trash of the last four my modesty, or my vanity, must be silent.

months. Besides, it is all easy to me,

be“P. S.- If you could spare it for an

cause I have been in Scotland so much hour in the evening, I wish you to send it (though then young enough too), and feel up to Mrs. Leigh, your neighbour, at the at home with the people, Lowland and London Hotel, Albemarle Street."

LETTER 190.

TO MR. MURRAY.

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TO MR. MURRAY.

TO MR. MURRAY.

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1 In a note which I wrote to him, before starting, next day, I find the following: -"I got Lara at three o'clock this morning -- read him before I slept, and was enraptured. I take the proofs with me."

9 He here refers to an article in No. 45. of the Edin

burgh Review, just then published, on The Corsair and Bride of Abydos.

3 An engraving by Agar from Phillips's portrait of bin. 4 Alluding to Lara.

Ær. 26.

THE ETTRICK SHEPHERD.

259

IR. MURRAY.

If he puts a

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LETTER 191.

TO MR. MURRAY.

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and M. We similar state de ot know that is se it for the sed, and not ates

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“A note will correct what Mr. Hobhouse quaintance with my old friend Ocean ; and thinks an error (about the feudal system in I find his bosom as pleasant a pillow for an Spain); - it is not Spain.

hour in the morning as his daughters of Pafew words of prose any where, it will set phos could be in the twilight. I have been all right.

swimming and eating turbot, and smuggling “I have been ordered to town to vote. neat brandies and silk handkerchiefs, - and I shall disobey. There is no good in so listening to my friend Hodgson's raptures much prating, since 'certain issues strokes about a pretty wife-elect of his, — and walkshould arbitrate. If you have any thing to ing, on cliffs, and tuinbling down hills, and say, let me hear from you.

making the most of the dolce far-niente' “Yours, &c.” for the last fortnight. I met a son of Lord

Erskine's, who says he has been married a

year, and is the happiest of men ;' and I

« August 3. 1814. have met the aforesaid H., who is also the " It is certainly a little extraordinary that happiest of men ;' so, it is worth while you have not sent the Edinburgh Review, as felicity of these foxes, who have cut off

being here, if only to witness the superlative Í requested, and hoped it would not require their tails, and would persuade the rest to a note a day to remind you. I see advertisements of Lara and Jacqueline ; pray, why? part with their brushes to keep them in

countenance. when I requested you to postpone publica

" It rejoiceth me that you like · Lara.' tion till my return to town.

Jeffrey is out with his 45th Number, which “I have a most amusing epistle from the I suppose you have got. He is only too Ettrick bard — Hogg ; in which, speaking kind to me, in my share of it, and I begin to

I of his bookseller, whom he denominates the fancy myself a golden pheasant, upon the 'shabbiest of the trade for not • lifting his strength of the plumage wherewith he hath bills,' he adds, in so many words, ‘G-d bedecked me. But then, surgit amari,' &c. d-n him and them both.' This is a pretty

the gentlemen of the Champion, and prelude to asking you to adopt him (the Perry, have got hold (I know not how) of said Hogg); but this he wishes ; and if you the condolatory address to Lady Jersey on please, you and I will talk it over. He has the picture-abduction by our Regent, and a poem ready for the press (and your bills have published them — with my name, too, too, if liftable'), and bestows some bene smack — without even asking leave, or indictions on Mr. Moore for his abduction of quiring whether or no! D-n their impuLara from the forthcoming Miscellany." dence, and d-n every thing. It has put

"P. S. – Sincerely, I think Mr. Hogg me out of patience, and so, I shall say no would suit you very well ; and surely he is

more about it.

“ You shall have Lara and Jacque (both a man of great powers, and deserving of encouragement. I must knock out a Tale with some additions) when out; but I am for him, and you should at all events con

still demurring and delaying, and in a fuss, sider before you reject his suit. Scott is and so is Rogers in his way. gone to the Orkneys in a gale of wind; and

“ Newstead is to be mine again. ClaughHogg says that, during the said gale, “he is ton forfeits twenty-five thousand pounds ; sure that Scott is not quite at his ease, to

but that don't prevent me from being very say the best of it.' Ah! I wish these home prettily ruined. I mean to bury myself keeping bards could taste a Mediterranean there --- and let my beard grow -- and hate white squall , or “the Gut' in a gale of wind, you all

. or even the ‘Bay of Biscay' with no wind

“Oh! I have had the most amusing at all.”

letter from Hogg, the Ettick minstrel and shepherd. He wants me to recommend him to Murray; and, speaking of his present

bookseller, whose bills' are never · lifted, “ Hastings, August 3. 1814. he adds, totidem verbis, ' God d-n him and "By the time this reaches your dwelling, them both.' I laughed, and so would you I shall (God wot) be in town again pro- too, at the way in which this execration is bably. I have been here renewing my ac- introduced. The said Hogg is a strange

MR. MURILE

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1 Mr. Hogg had been led to hope that he should be per- of the work arose certainly not from any ill will to this inmitted to insert this poem in a Miscellany which he had genious and remarkable man, but from a consideration at this time some thoughts of publishing ; and whatever of what I thought most advantageous to the fame of Lord advice I may have given against such a mode of disposing Byron.

from Philipsi pertinente

LETTER 193.

TO MR. MURRAY.

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LETTER 194.

TO MR. MURRAY.

I was

being, but of great, though uncouth, powers. his sins than me, being used to carry double
I think very highly of him, as a poet ; but without inconvenience.”
he, and half of these Scotch and Lake trou-
badours, are spoilt by living in litile circles
and petty societies. London and the world
is the only place to take the conceit out of
in the milling phrase.

" August 4. 1814
Scott, he
says, is gone to the Orkneys in a gale of

Not having received the slightest answer wind ; - during which wind, he affirms, the to my last three letters, nor the book (the said Scott, 6 he is sure, is not at his ease,

last number of the Edinburgh Review) which to say the best of it.' Lord, Lord, if these they requested, I presume that you were home-keeping minstrels had crossed your

the unfortunate person who perished in the Atlantic or my Mediterranean, and tasted pagoda on Monday last, and address this a little open boating in a white squall

rather to your executors than yourself, rea gale in the Gut'- or the Bay of Bis- gretting that you should have had the ill cay,' with no gale at all — how it would luck to be the sole victim on that joyous enliven and introduce them to a few of the occasion. sensations ! — to say nothing of an illicit • I beg leave, then, to inform these genamour or two upon shore, in the way of tlemen (whoever they may be) that I am a essay upon the Passions, beginning with little surprised at the previous neglect of the simple adultery, and compounding it as they deceased, and also at observing an adverwent along.

tisement of an approaching publication on " I have forwarded your letter to Murray, Saturday next, against the which I pro– by the way, you had addressed it to tested, and do protest for the present. Miller. Pray write to me, and say what

* Yours (or theirs), &c. art thou doing? Not finished !! -Oons !

"B." how is this? - these 'flaws and starts' must be `authorised by your grandam,' and are unbecoming of any other author. sorry to hear of your discrepancy with the

“ August 5. 1814 **s, or rather your abjuration of agreement. “ The Edinburgh Review is arrived – I don't want to be impertinent, or buffoon thanks. I enclose Mr. Hobhouse's letter, on a serious subject, and am therefore at a from which you will perceive the work you loss what to say:

have made. However, I have done : you “ I hope nothing will induce you to abate must send my rhymes to the devil your own from the proper price of your poem, as long way. It seems, also, that the faithful and as there is a prospect of getting it. For my spirited likeness' is another of your publiown part, I have seriously and not whiningly cations. I wish you joy of it; but it is no (for that is not my way at least, it used likeness — that is the point. Seriously, if I not to be) neither hopes, nor prospects, have delayed your journey to Scotland, I am and scarcely even wishes. I am, in some sorry that you carried your complaisance so respects, happy, but not in a manner that

far ; particularly as upon trifles you have a can or ought to last, but enough of that. more summary method ;-witness the graiThe worst of it is, I feel quite enervated and

mar of Hobhouse's 'bit of prose,' which has indifferent. I really do not know, if Ju- put him and me into a fever. piter were to offer me my choice of the

· Hogg must translate his own words :
contents of his benevolent cask, what I lifting' is a quotation from his letter, toge
would pick out of it. If I was born, as the ther with ‘God d-n,' &c., which I suppose
nurses say, with a silver spoon in my mouth,' requires no translation.
it has stuck in my throat, and spoiled my "I was unaware of the contents of Mr.
palate, so that nothing put into it is swal- Moore's letter ; I think your offer very hand-
lowed with much relish, unless it be some, but of that you and he must judge. If
cayenne. However, I have grievances enough he can get more, you won't wonder that he
to occupy me that way too ;-- but for fear should accept it.
of adding to yours by this pestilent long “ Out with Lara, since it must be. The
diatribe, 1 postpone the reading of them, tome looks pretty enough— on the outside.
sine die.

I shall be in town next week, and in the
• Ever, dear M., yours,
&c. mean time wish you a pleasant journey.

Yours, &c.
“P.S. - Don't forget my godson. You
could not have fixed on a fitter porter for

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Ær. 26.

LARA AND JACQUELINE.

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LETTER 195.

TO MR. MOORE.

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LETTER 196.

TO MR. MOORE.

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the astonishment that ensued. I had gone out of the theatre, for coolness, into the gar

den ;- there I had tumbled over some dogs, “ August 12. 1814.

and, coming away from them in very ill “ I was not alone, nor will be while I can humour, encountered the man in a worse, help it. Newstead is not yet decided. which produced all this confusion. Claughton is to make a grand effort by Sa

Well — and why don't you ‘launch ?'— turday week to complete, --if not, he must Now is your time. The people are tolegive up twenty-five thousand pounds and the rably tired with me, and not very much estate, with expenses, &c. &c. If I resume

enamoured of Wordsworths, who has just the Abbacy, you shall have due notice, and spawned aquarto of metaphysical blank verse, a cell set apart for your reception, with a which is nevertheless only a part of a poem. pious welcome. Rogers I have not seen,

Murray talks of divorcing Larry and but Larry and Jacky came out a few days Jacky – a bad sign for the authors, who, I ago. Of their effect I know nothing.

suppose, will be divorced too, and throw the * There is something very amusing in your blame upon one another. Seriously, I don't being an Edinburgh Reviewer. You know,

care a cigar about it, and I don't see why I suppose, that Thurlow 1 is none of the pla- Sam should. cidest, and may possibly enact some tragedy “Let me hear from and of you and my on being told that he is only a fool. If, godson. If a daughter, the name will do now, Jeffrey were to be slain on account of quite as well. an article of yours, there would be a fine

“ Ever, &c.” conclusion. For my part, as Mrs. Winifred Jenkins says, 'he has done the handsome thing by me, particularly in his last number ; so, he is the best of men and the ablest of

August 13. 1814. critics, and I won't have him killed-though ' I wrote yesterday to Mayfield, and have I dare say many wish he were, for being so just now enfranked your letter to mamma. good-humoured.

My stay in town is so uncertain (not later " Before I left Hastings I got in a passion than next week) that your packets for the with an ink-bottle, which I flung oui of the north may not reach me ; and as I know not window one night with a vengeance ; and | exactly where I am going - however, Newwhat then ? Why, next morning I was hor- stead is my most probable destination, and if rified by seeing that it had struck, and split you send your despatches before Tuesday, I upon, the petticoat of Euterpe's graven image can forward them to our new ally. But, in the garden, and grimed her as if it were after that day, you had better not trust to on purpose. Only think of my distress, – their arrival in time. and the epigrams that might be engendered “Lord Kinnaird has been exiled from Paris, on the Muse and her misadventure.

on dit, for saying the Bourbons were old “I had an adventure almost as ridiculous, women. The Bourbons might have been conat some private theatricals near Cambridge tent, I think, with returning the compliment. -- though of a different description — since “ I told you all about Jacky and Larry I saw you last. I quarrelled with a man in yesterday ; -- they are to be separated, the dark for asking me who I was (insolently at least, so says the grand M., and I know enough to be sure), and followed him into no more of the matter. Jeffrey has done me the green-room (a stable) in a rage, amongst more than justice ;' but as to tragedy a set of people I never saw before. He um! — I have no time for fiction at present. turned out to be a low comedian, engaged to A man cannot paint a storm with the vessel act with the amateurs, and to be a civil-spoken under bare poles on a lee-shore. When man enough, when he found out that nothing I get to land, I will try what is to be done, very pleasant was to be got by rudeness. But and, if I founder, there be plenty of mine you would have been amused with the row, elders and betters to console Melpomene. and the dialogue, and the dress — or rather “When at Newstead, you must come over, the undress

of the party, where I had in- if only for a day— should Mrs. M. be exigeante troduced myself in a devil of a hurry, and of your presence. The place is worth seeing,

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' [A critique on Lord Thurlow's poems had recently the window into the garden, where it lighted, as here deappeared in the Edinburgh Review.]

scribed, upon one of eight leaden Muses, that had been 2 His servant had brought him up a large jar of ink, | imported, some time before, from Holland, - the ninth into which, not supposing it to be full, he had thrust his having been, by some accident, left behind. pen down to the very bottom. Enraged, on finding it 3 [Mr. Wordsworth published, in 1814, his “Excursion ; come out all smeared with ink, he flung the bottle out of being part of the Recluse, a l'ocm."]

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