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Alder, Mr., 575.
A.

Alfieri, Vittorio, his description of his first
Aberdeen, town of, 4. 11, 12.

love, 9. Effect of the representation of
Absence, consolations in, 207.

hisMira' on Lord Byron, 252. 404.
Abstinence, the sole remedy for plethora, His conduct to his mother, 268. His
337.

tomb in the church of Santa Croce, 353.
Abydos, 103. 105, 106. 497. 663. See Bride

Coincidences between the disposition and
of Abydos.

habits of Lord Byron and, 644. His
Abyssinia, Lord Byron's project of visiting, Life' quoted, 9. 117. 228.
192.

Alfred Club, 147. 150. 303. 578.
Academical studies, effect of, on the ima-

Algarotti, Francesco, 378. His treatment of
ginative faculty, 65.

Lady M. W. Montagu, 387.
Acarnania, 99.

Ali Pacha of Yanina, account of, 96. 104.
Acerbi, Giuseppe, 327.

195. Lord Byron's visit to, 96. 104.
Achilles, 104.

His letter in Latin to Lord Byron, 195.
Actium, remains of the town of, 97.

Allegra (Lord Byron's natural daughter),
Actors, an impracticable race, 287.

389. 399. 401. 422, 423. 426. 440. 479.
Ada, 290. See Byron, Augusta-Ada.

501. 508. Her death, 557. 567. In-
Adair, Robert, esq., 110, 111. 120.

scription for a tablet to her memory, 559.
Adams, John, a carrier, who died of drunken- Allen, John, esq., 'a Helluo of books, 214.
ness, epitaph on, 51.

Althorp, Viscount (now Earl Spencer), 233.
Addison, Joseph, his character as a poet, 65. 246.

His conversation, 690. His · Drummer,' Alvanley (William Arden), second Lord,
704.

303.
• Adolphe,' Benjamin Constant's, its charac- Ambrosian library at Milan, visit to, 325.
ter, 310.

* Americani,' patriotic society so called, 489.
Adversity, 294.

Americans, 516.
Æneid the, written for political purposes, Amurath, Sultan, 234.
135.

* Anastasius,' Mr. Hope's, its character, 455.
Æschylus, 21. His Prometheus,' 368. • Anatomy of Melancholy,' Burton's, a most
His · Seven before Thebes,' 368.

amusing medley of quotations and classical
Agathon,' Wieland's history of, 420, 421. anecdotes, 48.
Aglietti, Dr., 378. 387, 388.

Andalusian nobleman, adventures of a young,
Ajax, 104.

527.
Alban Mount, 356.

Angelo, Michael, his tomb in the church of
Albania, 98, 99, 103.

Santa Croce, 353, 354.
Albanians, their character and manners, 98, Animal food, influence of, on the character,
99. 103.

150.
Alberoni, Cardinal, 203.

Anstey's • Bath Guide,' indecencies in, 428.
Albrizzi, Countess, some account of, 331. • Anti-Byron,' a satire, 231. 246.

Her conversazioni, 413. Her · Ritratti di Anti-Jacobin Review, 248.
Uomini Illustri,' 413. Her portrait of Antilochus, tomb of, 104.
Lord Byron, 413.

Antinous, the bust of, supernatural, 697.
Alcibiades, 104.

• Antiquary,' character of, 324.

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• Antony and Cleopatra,' observations on the

play of, 200.
Apollo Belvidere, 356.
Arethusa, fountain of, 595.
Argenson, Marquis d', his advice to Voltaire,

248.
Argostoli, 595.
Argyle Institution, 160.
Ariosto, his portrait by Titian, 352. Mea-

sure of his poetry, 367.
Aristides, 205.
Aristophanes, excellence of Mitchell's trans-

lation of, 455.
Armageddon,' Rev. George Townshend's,

135.
Armenian Convent of St. Lazarus, 329. 333.

Language, 329. 333. 335. Grammar,

333. 335, 336.
Arnaouts' or Albanese, 95, 96.
Art, not inferior to nature, for poetical pur-

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poses, 695.

Arta, gulf of, 99.
Ash, Thomas, author of The Book,' 224.

Lord Byron's generosity towards, 224.
Asiatics, 205.
Athens, 100.
Atticus, Herodes, 209.
Aubonne, 315.
Augusta, stanzas to, 305. Epistle to, 332.
Augustus Cæsar, his times, 448.
• Auld lang syne,' 548.
Authors, 231.
Avarice, 127. 420.
A year ago you swore,' &c. 462.

Barff, Mr., letters to, 622, 623. 627. 629,

630. 632, 633.
Barlorini, Princess, her monument at Bo-

logna, 398.
Barlow, Joel, character of his Columbiad,

49.
Barnes, Thomas, esq., 129.
Barry, Mr., banker of Genoa, 419, 591.
Bartley, George, comedian, 284.
Bartley, Mrs., actress, 282, 284.
Bartolini, sculptor, his bust of Lord Byron,

555. 571.
* Bath Guide,' Anstey's, 428.
Baths of Penelope, Lord Byron's visit to, 595.
• Baviad and Mæviad,' extinguishment of the

Della Cruscans by the, 357.
Bay of Biscay, 274.
Bayes, his expedient, 536.
Beattie, Dr., his • Minstrel,' 21. 70.
Beaumarchais, his singular good fortune, 146.
Beaumont and Fletcher, 634.
Beaumont, Sir George, 281.
Beauvais, Bishop of, 161.
Beccaria, anecdote of, 325.
Becher, Rev. John, 32. 39, 40. 43. 45. Leta

ters to, 67. 69. 71.
Beckford, William, esq., his · Tales' in con-

tinuation of Vathek,' 376.
• Beggars' Opera,' a St. Giles's lampoon, 213.
Behmen, Jacob, his reveries, 135.
Beloe, Rev. William, character of his · Sesa-

genarian,' 374.
Bembo, Cardinal, amatory correspondenæ

between Lucretia Borgia and, 325, 326.
Benacus, the (now the Lago di Garda), 396.
Bentham, Jeremy, quackery of his followers,

620.
Benzoni, Countess, her conversazioni, 413.

415. 512. Some account of, 415.
Beppo, a Venetian Story,' 304. 368. 371,

372. 379.
Bergami, the Princess of Wales's courier and

chamberlain, 336.
Bernadotte, Jean-Baptiste-Jules, King of

Sweden, 195.
Berni, the father of the Beppo style of writing,

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B.
Bacon, Lord, on the celibacy of men of
genius, 270.

877.
Berry, Miss, 164.
• Bertram,' Maturin's tragedy of, 287. 368.
Bettesworth, Captain (cousin of Lord Byron),

57.
Betty, William Henry West, actor, 166.
Beyle, M., his • Histoire de la Peinture en

Italie,' 326. His account of an interview
with Lord Byron at Milan, 326.

Inaccuracies in his Apoph-
thegms, 473, 474.
Baillie, Joanna, the only woman capable of

writing tragedy, 282.
Baillie, Dr. Matthew, consulted on Lord

Byron's supposed insanity, 662.
Baillie, • Long,' 304.
Baillie, David, esq., 45.
Balgownie, brig of, 12.
Baltimore, Lord, 66.
Bandello, his history of Romeo and Juliet,

332,
Bankes, William, esq., 60. 162. 421. 457.

Letters to, 41, 42. 87. 162, 173. 176. 428.

435. 437.
Barbarossa, Aruch, 203.
Barber, J. T., painter, 141.

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Bible, the, 536.

691. His hypochondriacism, 705. His
Biography, 655.

Missionary,' 711. Lord Byron's • Letter
• Bioscope, or Dial of Life,' Mr. Grenville on his Strictures on the Life and Writings
Penn's, 172.

of Pope,' 687. Lord Byron's Observ-
Birch, Alderman, 176.

ations upon Observations; a Second Let-
Biscay, bay of, 274.

ter,' &c. 701.
Blackett, Joseph, poetical shoemaker, 81. Bowring, Dr., Lord Byron's letters to, 586.
121, 134, 135.

588. 591. 601. 603, 604. 606.
Blackstone, Judge, composed his Commenta- Boxing, 204.

ries with a bottle of port before him, 690. Bradshaw, Hon. Cavendish, 282.
Blackwood's Magazine, its remarks on Don Braham, John, vocalist, 201. 274.

Juan, 431. • Some observations upon its Breme, Marquis de, 327.
remarks on Don Juan,' 443.

• Bride of Abydos; a Turkish Tale,' 197.
Blake, fashionable tonsor, 464.

200. 211, 212, 217, 218. 221. 245. 301.
Bland, Rev. Robert, 141, 145, 146. 213. Brientz, town and lake of, 314.
Blaquiere, Mr., 586. 617.

Brig of Balgownie, 12.
Bleeding, Lord Byron's prejudice against, 635. British Critic, 201.
Blessington, Earl of, 419. 576. Letters to, | British Review, its character of the “Giaour,'
577, 578, 579.

191. Lord Byron's Letter to the Editor
Blessington, Countess of, 576,577. Impromptu of, 406.

on her taking a villa called • Il Paradiso,' Broglie, Duchess of (daughter of Madame de
577. Lines written at the request of, 577. Staël), her character,321. Anecdote of, 395.
Letters to, 577. 580. 591.

Her remark on the errors of clever people,
Blinkensop, Rev. Mr., his Sermon on Chris- 653.
tianity, 188.

Brooke, Lord (Sir Fulke Greville), account
Blount, Martha, Pope's attachment to, 689.

of a MS. poem by, 176.
703.

Brougham, Henry, esq. (afterwards Lord
Blucher, Marshal, 416.

Brougham), 230.
• Blues, the;' a Literary Eclogue, 531. Broughton, the regicido his monument at
• Boatswain,' Lord Byron's favourite dog, 38. Vevay, 311.

44. 73. Inscription on his monument, Brown, Isaac Hawkins, his lava buttons, 267.
73.

Browne, Sir Thomas, his · Religio Medici'
Boisragon, Dr., 168.

quoted, 218.
Bolivar, Simon, 561.

Bruce, Mr., 113. 120.
Bologna, Lord Byron's visit to the cemetery Brummell, William, esq., 304.
at, 397, 398.

Bruno, Dr., 589. Anecdote of, 612.
Bolton, Mr., 130, 131, 132.

Brussels, 307.
Bonneval, Claudius Alexander, Count de, Bryant, Jacob, on the existence of Troy, 476.
203.

Brydges, Sir Egerton, his · Letters on the
Bonstetten, M., 309, 310, 348.

Character and Poetical Genius of Byron,'
Borgia, Lucretia, her amatory correspondence 180. His • Ruminator,' 204.
with Cardinal Bembo, 325, 326.

Buchanan, Rev. Dr., 192.
• Born in a garret, in a kitchen bred,' 302. Bucke, Rev. Charles, 178.
Borromean Islands, 325. 327.

Buonaparte, Lucien, his •

Charlemagne,' 145.
Bosquet de Julie, 311. 320.

193.
• Bosworth Field,' Lord Byron's projected Buonaparte, Napoleon, 128. 195. 201. 227.
epic of, 56. 58.

234, 239, 247. 277. 283. S04.
Botzari, Marco, his letter to Lord Byron, Burdett, Sir Francis, 157. 164.

His style of
596. His death, 596.

eloquence, 184.
Bowers, Mr., Lord Byron's schoolmaster at Burgess, Sir James Bland, 287.
Aberdeen, 6.

Burke, Edmund, 185.
Bowles, Rev. William Lisle, his controversy Burns, Robert, his habit of reading at meals,
concerning Pope, 463. 465. 486. 500. 504.

46.

His elegy on Maillie, 73. What
688, 689, 690. His • Spirit of Discovery,' would he have been, if a patrician ? 200.
688. His “invariable principles of poetry,' His unpublished letters, 214. His rank

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row, 17.

among poets, 699.

Often coarse, but never
vulgar, 610.
Burton's Anatomy of Melancholy, a most

amusing and instructive medley, 48.
Burun, Ralph de, 1.
Busby, Dr., Dryden's reverential regard for, 19.
Busby, Thomas, Mus. Doct., his monologue

on the opening of Drury Lane Theatre,
174. 176. His translation of Lucretius,

202. 246.
Butler, Dr. (head master of Harrow school),

21. 29. 55. 66. Reconciliation between

Lord Byron and, 89.
Byron, Sir John, the Little with the great

beard, 2.
Byron, Sir John, created (1643) Baron Byron

of Rochdale ; some account of, 2.
Byron, Sir Richard, tribute to his valour and

fidelity, 2.
Byron, Admiral John (grandfather of the

Poet), 3.
Byron, William, fifth Lord (grand-uncle of

the Poet), 3. His trial for killing Mr.
Chaworth in a duel, 3. His death, 10.

His eccentric and unsocial habits, 10.
Byron, John (father of the Poet), his elope-

ment with Lady Carmarthen, 3. His
marriage with Miss Catherine Gordon, 3.

His death at Valenciennes, 6.
Byron, Mrs. (mother of the Poet), descended

from the Gordons of Gight, 2. Vehemence.
of her feelings, 2. Ballad on the occasion
of her marriage, 3. Her fortune, 4. Sepa-
ration from her husband, 4. Her capricious
excesses of fondness and of anger, 4. 13.
Her death, 127. Lord Byron's letters to,
71. 73. 77. 88. 95. 103. 107. 110, 111.
114, 115, 116. 126. See also, 33, 34, 35,

36. 113. 127, 128, 129.
Byron, Honourable Augusta (sister of the

Poet), 3. See Leigh, Honourable Au-

gusta.
BYRON (GEORGE-GORDON-Byron), sixth

Lord
1788. Born Jan. 22., in Holles Street,

London, 4.
1790—1791. Taken by his mother to

Aberdeen, 4. Impetuosity of his temper,
5. Affectionate sweetness and playfulness
of his disposition, 5. The malformation
of his foot a source of pain and uneasiness
to him, 5. His early acquaintance with
the Sacred Writings, 5. Instances of his
quickness and energy, 6. Death of his
father, 6.

1792-1795. Sent to a day-school at Aber-

deen, 6. His own account of the prom
gress of his infantine studies, 6.

His
sports and exercises, 7.
1796–1797. Removed into the High-

lands, 7. His visits to Lachin-y-gair, 7.
First awakening of his poetic talent, &
His early love of mountain scenery, 9.

Attachment for Mary Duff, 9.
1798. Succeeds to the title, 10. Made

a ward of Chancery, under the guardian.
ship of the Earl of Carlisle, and removed
to Newstead, 11. Placed under the care
of an empiric at Nottingham for the

cure of his lameness, 14.
1799. First symptom of a tendency towards

rhyming, 14. Removed to London, and
put under the care of Dr. Baillie, 15.
Becomes the pupil of Dr. Glennie, at

Dulwich, 15.
1800—1804. His boyish love for his

cousin, Margaret Parker, 17. His Girst
dash into poetry,' 17. Is sent to Har-

Notices of his school life, 20.
His first Harrow verses, 20. His school
friendships, 22. His mode of life as a
schoolboy, 25. Accompanies his mother
to Bath, 26. His early attachment to
Miss Chaworth, 26. Heads a rebelling
at Harrow, 29. Passes the vacation at

Southwell, 30.
1805. Removed to Cambridge, 30. His

college friendships, 31.
1806. Aug. - Nov., prepares a collection

of his poems for the press, 37. His
visit to Harrowgate, 37. Southwell
private theatricals, 38. Prints a volume
of his poems; but, at the entreaty of
Mr. Becher, commits the edition to the

flames, 39.
1807. Publishes · Hours of Idleness, ' 4S.

List of historical writers whose works he
had perused at the age of nineteen, 46.
Reviews Wordsworth's Poems, 56. Begins
• Bosworth Field,' an epic, 56. Writes

part of a novel, 58.
1808. His early scepticism, 58. Effect

produced on his mind by the critique on
• Hours of Idleness,' in the Edinburgh
Review, 67. Passes his time between the
dissipations of London and Cambridge,
69. Takes up his residence at Newstead,
71. Forms the design of visiting India,
73. Prepares • English Bards and
Scotch Reviewers' for the press, 74.

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1809. His coming of age celebrated at

Newstead, 75. Takes his seat in the
House of Lords, 78. Loneliness of his
position at this period, 80. Sets out on
his travels, 83. State of mind in which
he took leave of England, 83. Visits
Lisbon, Seville, Cadiz, Gibraltar, Malta,
Prevesa, Zitza, Tepaleen, 91-95. Is
introduced to Ali Pacha, 95. Begins
• Childe Harold' at Ioannina, in Albania,
96. Visits Actium, Nicopolis; nearly
lost in a Turkish ship of war; proceeds
through Acarnania and Ætolia towards
the Morea, 99. Reaches Missolonghi,
99. Visits Patras, Vostizza, Mount
Parnassus, Delphi, Lepanto, Thebes,
Mount Cithæron, 99. Arrives, on Christ-

mas-day, at Athens, 100.
1810. Spends ten weeks in visiting the

monuments of Athens; makes excur-
sions to several parts of Attica, 100.
The Maid of Athens, 101. Leaves
Athens for Smyrna, 102.

Visits ruins
of Ephesus, 102. Concludes, at Smyrna,
the second canto of Childe Harold,'
102. April, leaves Smyrna for Constan-
tinople, 103. Visits the Troad, 103.
Swims from Sestos to Abydos, 103.
May, arrives at Constantinople, 105.
June, expedition through the Bosphorus
to the Black Sea, 106.

July, visits
Corinth, 111. Aug.- Sept., makes a
tour of the Morea, 11l. Returns to

Athens, 113.
1811. Writes Hints from Horace,' and

•Curse of Minerva,' 114. Returns to
England, 115. Effect of travel on the
general character of his mind and dis-
position, 117. His first connection
with Mr. Murray, 126.

Death of his
mother, 127. Of his college friends
Matthews and Wingfield, 129. 134.
And of • Thyrza,' 140. Origin of his
acquaintance with Mr. Moore, 142. Act
of generosity towards Mr. Hodgson,

150.
1812. Feb. 27., makes his first speech in

the House of Lords, 154. Feb. 29.,
publishes the first and second cantos of
• Childe Harold,' 157. Presents the
copyright of the poem to Mr. Dallas,
159. Although far advanced in a fifth
edition of · English Bards, determines
to commit it to the flames, 162. Pre-
sented to the Prince Regent, 164.

Writes the Address for the opening of

Drury Lane Theatre, 166.
1813. April, brings out anonymously

• The Waltz,' 177. May, publishes the
• Giaour,' 178. His acquaintance,
through Mr. Moore, with Mr. Leigh
Hunt, 183. Makes preparations for a
voyage to the East, 187. Projects a
a journey to Abyssinia, 192. Dec.,
publishes the • Bride of Abydos,' 217.
Is an unsuccessful suitor for the hand of

Miss Milbanke, 225.
1814. Jan., publishes the “Corsair,'

235. April, writes • Ode on the Fall of
Napoleon Buonaparte,' 247. Comes to
the resolution not only of writing no
more, but of suppressing all he had ever
written, 250. May, writes · Lara, ' 256.
Makes a second proposal for the hand
of Miss Milbanke, and is accepted, 263.

Dec., writes · Hebrew Melodies,' 273.
1815. Jan. 2., marries Miss Milbanke,

272. April, becomes personally ac-
quainted with Sir Walter Scott, 279.
May, becomes a member of the sub-com-
mittee of Drury Lane Theatre, 282.
Pressure of pecuniary embarrassments,
289. July, writes · Siege of Corinth,'

290. Sept., writes · Parisina,' 290.
1816. Jan., Lady Byron adopts the reso-

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lution of separating from him, 292.
Samples of the abuse lavished on him,
297. March, writes · Fare thee well,'
and • A Sketch,' 302.

April, leaves
England, 305. His route Brussels,
Waterloo, &c., 307. Takes up his
abode at the Campagne Diodati, 308.
Finishes, June 27., the third canto of
• Childe Harold,' 308. Writes, June
28., • Prisoner of Chillon,' 321. Writes,
in July, · Monody on the Death of She-
ridan,' the Dream,' • Darkness,''Epistle
to Augusta,' Churchill's Grave,' • Pro-
metheus' Could I remount,'· Sonnet to
Lake Leman,' and part of • Manfred,'
321. August, unsuccessful negotia-
tion for a domestic reconciliation, 321.
Sept., makes a tour of the Bernese Alps,
311. His intercourse with Mr. Shelley,
315. Oct., proceeds to Italy — route,
Martigny, the Simplon, Milan, Verona,
324–328. Nov., takes up his residence
at Venice, 328. Mariana Segati, 329.

Studies the Armenian language, 329.
1817. Feb., finishes • Manfred,' 340.

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