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To the Honorable the Senate

and House of Representatives : Agreeably to law, the undersigned most respectfully submits the following, as the annual report of the Maine State Prison for the term of one year and four months, ending 30th of April, 46.

There are now confined in the Prison, 60 convicts and they are employed as follows, viz: In the Quarry, 12 In the Smith Shops,

4 Shoe Shop,

Wheelwrights' Shops,

7 Tailors, 3 In the Hospital,

3 Washers, 2 Lumpers,

2 Waiters,

1 Cooks, 2 Aggregate,

60 The last annual report was made to the Legislature, 31st of December, 1844. By reference to that report, it will be seen there was then in confinement, 75 prisoners, and a decrease since that time, of fifteen in number, or twenty per cent.

We should be glad to believe that crime had also decreased in the same proportion. It must be a happy reflection, when we are informed that our State, numbering 500,000 inhabitants, has in our State Prison, no more than 60 prisoners. Other States, we are sorry to say, are not so fortunate. Some of them have in their State Prisons, some three

Wm. T. Johnson, Printer to the State.

STATE OF MAINE.

In Senate, June 12, 1846. Ordered, That 800 copies of the foregoing communication and accompanying abstract, be printed for the use of the Legislature.

DANIEL T. PIKE, Secretary.

No. 9.

SENATE.

ANNUAL REPORT

OF THE

WARDEN OF THE STATE PRISON.

To the Honorable the Senate

and House of Representatives : Agreeably to law, the undersigned most respectfully submits the following, as the annual report of the Maine State Prison for the term of one year and four months, ending 30th of April, 1846.

There are now confined in the Prison, 60 convicts and they are employed as follows, viz: In the Quarry, 12 In the Smith Shops,

4 Shoe Shop, 24 Wheelwrights' Shops,

7 Tailors, 3 In the Hospital,

3 Washers,

2 Lumpers, Waiters,

1 Cooks, 2 Aggregate,

60 The last annual report was made to the Legislature, 31st of December, 1844. By reference to that report, it will be seen there was then in confinement, 75 prisoners, and a decrease since that time, of fifteen in number, or twenty per cent.

We should be glad to believe that crime had also decreased in the same proportion. It must be a happy reflection, when we are informed that our State, numbering 500,000 inhabitants, has in our State Prison, no more than 60 prisoners. Other States, we are sorry to say, are not so fortunate. Some of them have in their State Prisons, some three

Wm. T. Johnson, Printer to the State.

and four, and even as high as fifteen hundred prisoners, besides a large number in Houses of Correction.

The condition of our Prison as it regards health and comfort, never was better. Our former anticipations in this matter are fully realized. Now all of the convicts have good warm and dry beds to sleep in. The new Prison has been in operation about eighteen months, and the comfort which the prisoners must have enjoyed during the two cold winters, is worth all the expense of erecting it.

The finances of the Prison are in a good condition, as much so as could reasonably be expected, when we take into account, that it is sixteen months since my last report, which includes two winters. In the winter, our expenses are much more than in the warmer part of the year. In looking at the general account, a large item of expense will be seen in the article of wood. Before the erection of the new Prison our expenses in winter were more than in summer, and since that time have been increased, as we consume a larger quantity of wood in the new Prison, fires being kept during the night, to warm the prisoners. The price of wood for the last year has been much higher than for many years. There is another cause for enhancing our expenses, which is the scarcity and high price of potatoes, as well as that of corn, &c.

In my last report, I then ventured to predict that the Prison would not need an appropriation for any thing, including officers' salaries ; but the reasons just given, I trust, will be sufficient to show that we have needed and received the salary of officers. In addition to the above reasons, is one more, and

a stronger one. At the time I last reported, a large portion of our convicts were under contract to Samuel Bigelow, of Boston, for five years. After haring them some five or six months, he failed, and his contract was stopped, leaving a debt due the Prison for the labor of convicts.

A suit was instituted, and prosecuted to judgment, against Bigelow and his bondsman, a part of which, only as yet, has been received. If this contract had been carried out in good faith, as we had reason to believe it would, we should not have needed even the salaries of the officers.

The Prison now owes $8,395 00, and has due $12,089 78. leaving a balance in favor of Prison, of $3,694 78. Some portion of this sum will not be collected, as in all such demands a portion will be worthless. A large portion of the Prison liabilities are due to individuals trading with the Prison, which are arranged for and all its debts are paid at maturity. We have in stock and tools on hand, at this time, $ 17,437 89, which is an increase from last year of $4,215 59. The Prison has paid all its expenses during the last sixteen months, and $1,822 80 towards officers' salaries.

The question is now asked, as it has been before, if the Prison pays its way, why call for the salary of officers ? The answer is, the surplus of $3,694 78, added to $17,437 89 in stock, and the new Prison of $13,177 44, you have the sum of $34,310 11, and about $9,000, occasioned by fire, &c., in 1841 ; in this you have $43,310 11. The State has paid in appropriations and subordinate officers at the Prison, since 26th of April, 1839, the sum of $41,014 59. The stock on hand, on the 26th of April, 1839, was $9,554 28, to be added, which is $50,568 87; from this deduct $43,310 il, and you have $7,258 76, total loss or expense more than income, in seven years and four days, since the present incumbent took charge and has been in charge since, except one year.

There are some $2,000 00 more to be deducted from the $7,258 76, that the Prison has in property on hand, such as new lime kiln sheds, and other repairs of real estate about the Prison, and making over the entire fence about the yard, &c., &c. Then the whole expense will be $5,258 76. I have thought proper to be thus particular in making plain this statement, as some persons who look at the tables or general account, do not readily understand them. I have no doubt that the Prison will be able to go along this year, by receiving the salary of officers from the State. I am in hopes to reduce the liabilities of the Prison this year, and shall endeavor to square them all off, by the collection of dues from those indebted to the Prison. I am of the opinion that the Prison will soon cease to be a drain upon the treasury, although it cannot be expected to pay as well with our small number of convicts, as it

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