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moral influence can be exercised, thus to do something more to prevent the crimes, which it now costs the State so much to punish.”

The second and third sections of the law of 1837, on the subject of the duties of the Massachusetts' board of education, read thus: “ The board of education shall prepare and lay before the Legislature in a printed form, on or before the second Wednesday of January, annually, an abstract of the school returns received by the secretary of the commonwealth, and the said board of education may appoint their own secretary, who shall receive a reasonable compensation for his services, and who shall, under the direction of the board, collect information of the actual condition and efficiency of the common schools and other means of popular education, and diffuse as widely as possible throughout every part of the commonwealth, information of the most approved and successful methods of arranging the studies and conducting the education of the young, to the end that all children in this commonwealth who depend upon common schools for instruction, may have the best education, which those schools can be made to impart.

“The board of education annually, shall make a detailed report to the Legislature of all its doings, with such observations as their experience and reflection may suggest, upon the condition and efficiency of our system of popular education, and the most practicable means of improving and extending it."

What should be the mode of electing a State board of education, is an important question.

On this point we may be permitted, we hope, to speak freely; we would not be misunderstood. In nothing, which we say, do we intend to impeach in the slightest degree, either the wisdom or the fidelity of those, who now, in any manner, represent the government.

The first qualification of men elected to this office should be fitness to discharge the duties of it, alike as it respects their literary qualifications, their ability to think calmly, and to judge discretely, and their deep interest in the cause, which it is made their duty to superintend.

A second qualification should be freedom from political bias, and from sectarian tendency, to that degree certainly, which will give security that the board shall never be prostituted, in any sense, to party purposes.

The objection to entrusting this electing power to the Governor and Council, or to the Legislature, would be, that, in many minds a suspicion would be raised that it might not always be judiciously exercised, and that the board might at length degenerate into an organ of church, or of State, perhaps both.

If the choice were made by the popular vote immediately, no greater certainty could be afforded of obtaining judicious and interested persons for the office.

Should the board be empowered to perpetuate itself, its independency might deprive it of sympathy.

A mode of electing this body, to which many would give preference, among others the Hon. H. Mann, secretary of the board of education of Mass., would be to refer the election to persons, who had been themselves elected by the people specifically for that object. The electors might be the chairmen of the school committees of the several towns, who might be empowered and required to meet annually, or at longer intervals, at some central place in each county to discharge their duty.

Besides to a good degree, obviating objections, to which the other modes seem liable, there would be advantages connected with this, wbich could not attach to them. There are, in the State, thirteen counties, containing in all about three hundred and sixty towns. By this method, consequently, there would be annually collected, or as often as might be thought best, more than three hundred men in thirteen distinct associations.

Now if these gatherings occurred in different years, or at different periods of the same year, opportunity would be given for the agent of the board to be present at each of them, when he might accurately ascertain by reports, or otherwise, the actual condition of towns respecting their educational efforts, and when having got this knowledge, he might impart valuable suggestions, and advice as to methods of greater improvements, or of removing apathy.

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These assemblies might be empowered to decide many important questions pertaining to the welfare of the schools in their several counties. Such as for example, the branches of studies to be pursued in schools; books to be recommended, in what branches teachers shall be examined; how such exaninations shall be conducted, and what shall be considered necessary qualifications of a teacher.

They might also discuss subjects pertaining to the districting of towns; to raising of moneys for the support of schools; and pumberless others of a kindred nature.

These occasions would likewise afford convenient opportunities for holding county conventions of education, when teachers and others interested in the advancement of learning, might come together to devise ways and means for the fulfilment of their desires.

Moved by these considerations, your memorialists respectfully pray you to consider the expediency of appointing a board of education, and of devising such other means as in your wisdom shall seem best, for the benefit of our free school system.

AMOS BROWN.
PHILIP EASTMAN.
A. S. PACKARD.
SAMUEL P. BENSON.

TWENTY-SIXTH LEGISLATURE.

No. 11.

HOUSE.

STATE OF MAINE,

IN THE YEAR OF OUR LORD ONE THOUSAND EIGHT HUNDRED AND

FORTY-SIX.

AN ACT in relation to fugitives from justice.

Be it enacted by the Senate and House of Represent2 atives in Legislature assembled, as follows: 3 SECTION 1. Whenever any person shall be found 4 within this State, charged with any offence committed 5 in any other State or territory and liable, by the con6 stitution and laws of the United States, to be deliv7 ered over upon the demand of the Executive of such 8 other State or territory, any court or magistrate, au9 thorized to issue warrants in criminal cases, may, upon 10 complaint under oath, setting forth the offence and 11 such other matters as are necessary to bring the case 12 within the provisions of law, issue a warrant to bring 13 the person so charged before the same or any other 14 court or magistrate, within the State, to answer to 15 such complaint, as in other cases.

Wm. T. Johnson, Printer to the State.

These assemblies might be empowered to decide many important questions pertaining to the welfare of the schools in their several counties. Such as for example, the branches of studies to be pursued in schools ; books to be recommended, in what branches teachers shall be examined; how such exaninations shall be conducted, and what shall be considered necessary qualifications of a teacher.

They might also discuss subjects pertaining to the districting of towns; to raising of moneys for the support of schools; and oumberless others of a kindred nature.

These occasions would likewise afford convenient opportunities for holding county conventions of education, when teachers and others interested in the advancement of learning, might come together to devise ways and means for the fulfilment of their desires.

Moved by these considerations, your memorialists respectfully pray you to consider the expediency of appointing a board of education, and of devising such other means as in your wisdom shall seem best, for the benefit of our free school system.

AMOS BROWN.
PHILIP EASTMAN.
A. S. PACKARD.
SAMUEL P. BENSON

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