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265

266

PAGE

PAGE

Other Benefits

256 Imaginative Regrets

259

Continued.

256 Reflections

259

Crusaders.

256 Translation of the Bible

259

As faith thus sanctified the warrior's crest 256 The Point at issue

259

Where long and deeply hath been fixed Edward VI.

259

the root .

256 Edward signing the Warrant for the Exe-

Transubstantiation

257 cution of Joan of Kent .

259

The Vaudois

257 Revival of Popery

2бо

Praised be the Rivers, from their moun- Latimer and Ridley :

260

tain springs

257 Cranmer

260

Waldenses

257 General View of the Troubles of the Re-

Archbishop Chichely to Henry V.

257

formation

260

Wars of York and Lancaster

257 English Reformers in Exile :

260

Wicliffe

257 | Elizabeth

260

Corruptions of the higher Clergy 258 Eminent Reformers

260

Abuse of Monastic Power

258 | The Same .

261

Monastic Voluptuousness

258 Distractions

261

Dissolution of the Monasteries

258 Gunpowder Plot

261

The same Subject

258 Illustration. The Jung-Frau and the Fali

Continued.

258

of the Rhine near Schaffhausen

261

Saints

258 Troubles of Charles the First

261

The Virgin

258 Laud

261

Apology

259 Afflictions of England

261

PART III.- FROM THE RESTORATION TO THE PRESENT TIMES.

I saw the figure of a lovely Maid

261 | Confirmation-Continued

265

Patriotic Sympathies

- 262 Sacrament

Charles the Second

262 The Marriage Ceremony :

265

Latitudinarianism

262 Thanksgiving after Childbirth

265

Walton's Book of Lives

262 Visitation of the Sick

265

Clerical Integrity

262 The Commination Service

265

Persecution of the Scottish Covenanters 262 Forms of Prayer at Sea

265

Acquittal of the Bishops

262 Funeral Service

265

William the Third

263 Rural Ceremony

266

Obligations of Civil to Religious Liberty 263 Regrets

Sacheverel

263 Mutability

266

Down a swift Stream, thus far, a' bold

Old Abbeys

266

design

263 Emigrant French Clergy

266

ASPECTS OF CHRISTIANITY IN AMERICA

Congratulation

266

I. The Pilgrim Fathers

263 New Churches .

266

II. Continued

263 Church to be Erected

267

III. Concluded.-American Episcopacy 263 Continued.

267

Bishops and Priests, blessèd are ye, if New Church-yard

267

eep

263 Cathedrals, &c.

267

Places of Worship

264 Inside of King's College Chapel, Cam-

Pastoral Character

264 bridge

267

The Liturgy

264 The Same .

267

Baptism

264 Continued.

267

Sponsors

264 Ejaculation

268

Catechising

264 Conclusion

268

Confirmation

2641

YARROW REVISITED, AND OTHER POEMS,

COMPOSED (TWO EXCEPTED) DURING A TOUR IN SCOTLAND, AND ON THE ENGLISH BORDER, IN

THE AUTUMN OF 1831.

The gallant Youth, who may have gained 269 Suggested at Tyndrum in a Storm 271

On the Departure of Sir Walter Scott from The Earl of Breadalbane's Ruined Man-

Abbotsford, for Naples .

270

A Place of Burial in the South of Scotland 270

sion, and Family Burial-Place, near

Killin

271

On the Sight of a Manse in the South of “Rest and be Thankful !". At the Head

Scotland

270 of Glencroe

272

Composed in Roslin Chapel,' during å

Highland Hut

272

Storm

270 The Highland Broach

272

The Trosachs

271 The Brownie

273

The pibroch's note, discountenanced or To the Planet Venus, an Evening Star.

271 Composed at Loch Lomond .

273

Composed in the Glen of Loch Etive

271 Bothwell Castle. Passed unseen, on ac-

Eagles. Composed at Dunollie

Castle in count of stormy weather

273

the Bay of Oban

271 Picture of Daniel in the Lions' Den, ai

In the Sound of Muli

271

Hamilton Palace

273

278

286

PAGE

PAGE

The Avon. A Feeder of the Annan

273 Countess' Pillar

274

Suggested by a View from an Eminence Roman Antiquities. From the Roman

in Inglewood Forest

274

Station at Old Penrith

274

Hart's-horn Tree, near Penrith

274 Apology, for the foregoing Poems :

274

Fancy and Tradition

274

EVENING VOLUNTARIES.

Calm is the fragrant air, and loth to lose. 276 | The sun has long been set

On a high Part of the Coast of Cumberland 276 Composed upon an Evening of extraordi-

By the Sea-side

276 nary Splendour and Beauty

278

Not in the lucid intervals of life

277 Composed by the Sea-shore

279

By the Side of Rydal Mere

277 The Crescent-moon, the Star of Love 279

Soft as a cloud is yon blue Ridge-the To the Moon. Composed by the Sea-

Mere

277

side, -on the Coast of Cumberland

279

The leaves that rustled on this oak-crowned To the Moon. Rydal

280

hill

278

POEMS, COMPOSED OR SUGGESTED DURING A TOUR IN THE

SUMMER OF 1833.

Adieu, Rydalian Laurels! that have grown 281 | On the Frith of Clyde. In a Steam-boat 286

Why should the Enthusiast, journeying On revisiting Dunolly Castle

286

through this Isle

281 The Dunolly Eagle

286

They called Thee MERRY ENGLAND in Written in a Blank Leaf of Macpherson's

old time;

281 Ossian

To the River Greta, near Keswick : 281 Cave of Staffa :

287

To the River Derwent

281 Cave of Staffa. After the Crowd had de-

In Sight of the Town of Cockermouth

282 parted

287

Address from the Spirit of Cockermouth Cave of Staffa

287

Castle

282 Flowers on the Top of the Pillars at the

Nun's Well, Brigham

282 Entrance of the Cave

287

To a Friend. On the Banks of the Der-

287

went

282 Iona. Upon Landing

287

Mary Queen of Scots. Landing at the The Black Stones of Iona

287

Mouth of the Derwent, Workington 282 Homeward we turn. Isle of Columba's

Stanzas suggested in a Steam-boat off Cell

288

Saint Bees' Heads, on the Coast of Cum- Greenock

288

berland

282 There !” said a Stripling, pointing with

In the Channel, between the coast of meet pride

288
Cumberland and the Isle of Man 284 The River Eden, Cumberland .

288

At Sea off the Isle of Man

284 Monument of Mrs Howard (by Nolle-

Desire we past illusions to recai?

284 kens), in Wetheral Church, near Corby,

On entering Douglas Bay, Isle of Man 284 on the Banks of the Eden

288

By the Sea-shore, Isle of Man

284 Suggested by the foregoing

288

Isle of Man

285 Nunnery

288

Isle of Man

285 Steamboats, Viaducts, and Railways 289

By a Retired Mariner. (A Friend of the The Monument commonly called Long

Author).

285 Meg and her Daughters, near the river

At Bala-Sala, Isle of Man. (Supposed to Eden

289

be written by a Friend)

285 Lowther

289

Tynwald Hill

285 To the Earl of Lonsdale

289

Despond who will—I heard a voice exclaim 285 The Somnambulist

289

In the Frith of Clyde, Ailsa Crag. During To Cordelia M—Hallsteads, Ullswater

290

an Eclipse of the Sun, July 17

285 | Most sweet it is with unuplifted eyes 291

POEMS OF SENTIMENT AND REFLECTION.

Expostulation and Reply .

292 turist.) Composed while we were la-

The Tables Turned. An evening Scene

bouring together in his Pleasure-ground 297

on the same Subject

292 A Night Thought

297

Lines written in Early Spring

292 Incident characteristic of a favourite Dog 298

A Character

293 Tribute to the Memory of the same Dog 298

To my Sister

293 Fidelity

298

Simon Lee, the old Huntsman ; with an Ode to Duty

299

Incident in which he was concerned

Character of the Happy Warrior

299

Written in Germany, on one of the coldest The Force of Prayer; or, the Founding

Days of the Century

294 of Bolton Priory. A Tradition

300

A Poet's Epitaph

To the Daisy

294 A Fact, and an Imagination ; or, Cantite

295 and Alfred, on the Sea-shore

301

Matthew

295 A little onward lend thy guiding hand

301

The two April Mornings :

295 Ode to Lycoris

The Fountain. A Conversation

296 To the Same

302

Personal Talk

302

To the Spade of a Friend. (An Agricul-

296 The sylvan slopes with corn-clad fields

Upon the same occasion

303

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293

.

301

308

308

312

.

PAGE

PAGE

Memory

303 Ode, composed on May Morning

307

This Lawn, a carpet all alive :

303 To May

Humanity

304 Lines suggested by a Portrait from the

Thought on the Seasons

304

Pencil of F. Stone

, upon the Birth of her First-born The foregoing Subject resumed

Child, March 1833

305 So fair, so sweet, withal so sensitive

The Warning. A Sequel to the foregoing 305 Upon seeing a coloured Drawing of the

If this great world of joy and pain

307 Bird of Paradise in an Album

310

The Labourer's Noon-day Hymn

307

SONNETS DEDICATED TO LIBERTY AND ORDER.

Composed after reading a Newspaper of Men of the Western World ! in Fate's dark

the Day,

312 book

313

Upon the late General Fast. March 1832 312 To the Pennsylvanians

313

Said Secrecy to Cowardice and Fraud 312 At Bologna, in Remembrance of the late

Blest Statesman He, whose Mind's un- Insurrections, 1837

313

selfish will

3r2 Continued.

313

In allusion to various recent Histories and Concluded

313

Notices of the French Revolution 312 Young England what is then become of

Continued.

Old

313

Concluded

313 | Feel for the wrongs to universal ken

314

SONNETS UPON THE PUNISHMENT OF DEATH.

Suggested by the View of Lancaster Castle Fit retribution, by the moral code

(on the Road from the South)

315 Though to give timely warning and deter

Tenderly do we feel by Nature's law 315 Our bodily life, some plead, that life the

The Roman Consul doomed his sons to die 315 shrine

Is Death, when evil against good has fought 315) Ah, think how one compelled for life to

Not to the object specially designed 315 abide

Ye brood of conscience-Spectres ! that See the Condemned alone within his cell

frequent

315 Conclusion

Before the world had past her time of youth 316 ) Apology

MISCELLANEOUS POEMS.

Epistle to Sir George Howland Beau- On the same Occasion

324

mont, Bart. From the South-West Coast The Horn of Egremont Castle

324

of Cumberland.-1811

Upon perusing the foregoing Epistle thirty

317 Goody Blake and Harry Gill. A true

Story

325

Years after its Composition

319 Prelude, prefixed to the Volume entitled

Gold and Silver Fishes in a Vase

320 “Poems chiefly of Early and Late

Liberty. (Sequel to the above.). (Ad- Years."

326

dressed to a Friend ; the Gold and Silver To a Child. Written in her Album

327

Fishes having been removed to a Pool Lines written in the Album of the Countess

in the Pleasure-ground of Rydal Mount] 320 of Lonsdale. Nov. 5, 1834 ·

Poor Robin

327

321 Grace Darling .

327

The Gleaner. isuggested by a Picture.) 322 The Russian Fugitive-

To a Redbreast-in Sickness.)

322

Part I.

328

Floating Island

322

Part II.

Once I could hail (howe'er serene the sky) 323 Part III.

330

To the Lady Fleming, on seeing the

Part IV..

330

Foundation preparing for the Erection
of Rydal Chapel, Westmoreland .

323

INSCRIPTIONS.

In the Grounds of Coleorton, the Seat of In these fair vales hath many a Tree 343

Sir George Beaumont, Bart. Leicester- The massy Ways, carried across these

shire

332 heights

334

In a Garden of the Same :

332 Inscriptions supposed to be found in and

Written at the Request of Sir George near a Hermit's Cell

334

Beaumont, Bart., and in his Name, for

1. Hopes what are they R–Beads

an Urn, placed by him at the Termina-

of morning

334

tion of a newly-planted Avenue, in the

II. Pause; Traveller ! 'whosoe'er

same Grounds

332

thou be

*334

For a Seat in the Groves of Coleorton

332 IV. Near the Spring of the Hermit-

Written with a Pencil upon a Stone in the

age

*334

Wall of the House (an Out-house), on

III. Hast thou seen with flash in:

the Island at Grasmere

333

cessant.

334

Written with a Slate Pencil on a Stone, on

V. Not seldom, clad in radiant vest 37€

the side of the Mountain of Black Comb 333 For the Spot where the Hermitage

Written with a Slate Pencil upon a Stone,

stood on St Herbert's Island,

the largest of a Heap lying near a de-

Derwent-water

335

serted Quarry upon one of the Islands On the Banks of a Rocky Stream

335

at Ryda)

333

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SELECTIONS FROM CHAUCER MODERNISED,

PAGE

PAGE

The Prioress' Tale

336 | Troilus and Cresida .

341

The Cuckoo and the Nightingale

338

POEMS REFERRING TO THE PERIOD OF OLD AGE.

The Old Cumberland Beggar

344 | The Two Thieves; or, the Last Stage of

The Farmer of Tilsbury Vale

345 Avarice

347

The Small Celandine

346 Animal Tranquillity and Decay:

347

EPITAPHS AND ELEGIAC PIECES.

Epitaphs translated from Chiabrera-

Elegiac Verses, in memory of my Brother,

Weep not, beloved Friends ! nor let John Wordsworth, Commander of the

the air

348 E.I. Company's Ship the Earl of Aber-

Perhaps some needful service of the

gavenny, in which he perished by Cala-

State

348

mitous Shipwreck, Feb. 6, 1805

o Thou who movest onward with a

353

Lines composed at Grasmere, during a

mind

348

Walk one Evening, after a stormy Day,

There never breathed a man who,

the Author having just read in a News-

when his life

348 paper that the Dissolution of Mr Fox

True is it that Ambrosio Salinero

349 was hourly expected

353

Destined to war from very infancy 349 Invocation to the Earth. February, 1816. 353

O flower of all that springs from gentle Lines written on a Blank Leaf in a Copy

blood,

349 of the Author's Poem “The Excur.

Not without heavy grief of heart did șion,” upon hearing of the Death of the

He

349

late Vicar of Kendal

353

Pause, courteous Spirit!– Balbi

sup-

Elegiac Stanzas. Addressed to Sir G. H.

plícates

349 B., upon the Death of his Sister-in-law 353

By a blest Husband guided, Mary came 349 Elegiac Musings in the Grounds of Co-

Six months to six years added he remained 350 leorton Hall, the Seat of the late Sir G.

Cenotaph ·

350 H. Beaumont, Bart.

354

Epitaph in the Chapel-yard of Langdale, Written after

the Death of Charles Lamb

354

Westmoreland

350 Extempore Effusion upon the Death of

Address to the Scholars of the Village James Hogg.

355

School of -

350 Inscription for a Monument in Crosth

Elegiac Stanzas, suggested by a Picture

waite Church, in the Vale of Keswick 356

of Peele Castle in a Storm, painted by ODE. INTIMATIONS OF IMMORTALITY

Sir George Beaumont

351 FROM

RECOLLECTIONS

EARLY

To the Daisy
351

357

THE PRELUDE, OR GROWTH OF A POET'S MIND.

AN AUTOBIOGRAPHICAL POEM.

Advertisement.

IX. Residence in France

400

Воок 1. Introduction. - Childhood

X. Residence in France (con-

and School-time

360

tinued)

H. School-time (continued)

365

xi. Residence in France (con:

III. Residence at Cambridge 369

cluded)

409

IV. Summer Vacation

374

XII. Imagination and Taste, how

V. Books.

377

impaired and restored

413

VI. Cambridge and the Alps

382

XIII. Imagination and Taste, how

VII. Residence in London.

inipaired and restored

VIII. Retrospect.-Love of Na-

(concluded)

416

ture leading to Love of

XIV. Conclusion,

419

Man

394

THE EXCURSION.

Dedication-Preface to the Edition of 1814" 423 | Book VII. The Church-yard among the

BOOK I. The Wanderer

425

Mountains (continued) 477

II. The Solitary

432

VIII. The Parsonage

485

III. Despondency

IX, Discourse of the Wanderer,

IV. Despondency Corrected

and an Evening Visit to

V. The Pastor.

the Lake.

490

VI. The Church-yard among the

Mountains

467

.

388

.

440

::::

448
458

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9

were

Of the Poems in this class, “THE EVENING WALK” and “DESCRIPTIVE SKETCHES first published in 1793. They are reprinted with some alterations that were chiefly made very soon after their publication.

This notice, which was written some time ago, scarcely applies to the Poem, “Descriptive Sketches," as it now stands. The corrections, though numerous, are not, however, such as te prevent its retaining with propriety a place in the class of Juvenile Pieces. 1836. I.

The horse alone, seen dimly as I pass,

Is cropping audibly his later meal:
EXTRACT

Dark is the ground; a slumber seems to steal FROM THE CONCLUSION OF A POEM, COMPOSED O'er vale, and mountain, and the starless sky.

IN ANTICIPATION OF LEAVING SCHOOL. Now, in this blank of things, a harmony, DEAR native regions, I foretell,

Home-felt, and home-created, comes to heal From what I feel at this farewell,

That grief for which the senses still supply That, wheresoe'er my steps may tend,

Fresh food; for only then, when memory And whensoe'er my course shall end,

Is hushed, am I at rest. My Friends ! restrain If in that hour a single tie

Those busy cares that would allay my pain ; Survive of local sympathy,

Oh ! leave me to myself, nor let me feel My soul will cast the backward view,

The officious touch that makes me droop again. The longing look alone on you. Thus, while the Sun sinks down to rest Far in the regions of the west,

III.
Though to the vale no parting beam

AN EVENING WALK.
Be given, not one memorial gleamn,
A lingering light he fondly throws

ADDRESSED TO A YOUNG LADY.
On the dear hills where first he rose,

General Sketch of the Lakes-Author's regret 1786.

of his Youth which was passed amongst them - Short description of Noon–CascadoNoon-tide Retreat- Precipice and sloping.

Lights-Face of Nature as the Sun declines WRITTEN IN VERY EARLY YOUTH.

Mountain-farm, and the Cock-Slate-quarry Calm is all nature as a resting wheel.

-Sunset-Superstition of the Country conThe kine are couched upon the dewy grass ;

nected with that moment-Swans--Female

A

II.

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