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proof, it surely could not be necessary for him to support them by proof. We too well understand the feelings of an unsuccessful candidate at the termination of a warmly contested election, to lace the utmost reliance on a declaration that e will proceed to a scrutiny, when that scrutiny is to carry him from home, and to create much trouble and expense. And will we yet say that when such a declaration is made, the returned member is at his peril to collect his proof whatever trouble or expense he may incur by it?, I beggentlemen to reflect on the effect of establishing this as a principle in the case of contested elections. Is it not obvious that it may be made a weapon of oppression in the hands of every heated and disappointed candidate? He has only at the close of the election to give a notice, that costs him nothing, and although at the very time he does not intend to proceed to a scrutiny, yet his successful opponent, who cannot dive into his mind, must labor from that time forth to establish his election. If he fails to do so, and the losing candidate can, near the commencement of a session, procure some proof which casts a cloud over o: election, or raises a presumption against the return, the whole state of things is varied. This is truly a discovery in elections, and may be called a plan for a minority to be made a majority, or how a man that is not elected by his district may be chosen for it by this House. I shall press but one more consideration on the House. The sitting member declares that he did not know of any mode in which he could take

testimony, and did not believe that it could be

taken until some order was made here; that in the laws of Virginia he could find nothing which applied to his case, and that he found our statute respecting contested elections had long since exired. Is there any reason to disbelieve him 7 et every newly returned member ask himself the question, whether his impressions until he came here were not the same; and is there not even some cause to believe, after all, that the conjecture was right? True it is, sir, that we have on one or two occasions received testimony under a kind of common law, which it seems we have on this subject, and this may have been made known to the petitioner as he has heretofore had a seat in this #. but it is not to be presumed that the sitting member, a mere farmer and country gentleman, who now for the first time appears here, and who never before, in all probability, attended to the manner in which contested elections are conducted by us, should be conversant with our common law of elections, if indeed we have such law. And this I think, is of itself sufficient to do away all idea of culpable negligence. In every view of the subject which I have been able to take, I think the sitting member is entitled to further time to procure testimony, and I shall accordingly so vote. The question on concurring with the Committee of Elections, in their said report, was then determined in the negative-yeas 46, nays 65, as follows: YEAs—Ezekiel Bacon, John Baker, William W.

Bibb, Abijah Bigelow, Elijah Brigham, Martin Chittenden, John Clopton, John Davenport, jun., William Ely, James Emott, William Findley, Asa Fitch, Charles Goldsborough, Bolling Hall, Obed Hall, Aylett Hawes, Richard Jackson, junior, Philip B. Key, Lyman Law, Robert Le Roy Livingston, Nathaniel Macon, Archibald McBryde, William McCoy, Samuel McKee, Arunah Metcalf, John Milnor, Jonathan O. Moseley, Thomas Newbold, Israel Pickens, Timothy Pitkin, junior, James Pleasants, jr., Elisha R. Potter, Josiah Quincy, John Randolph, William Reed, Henry M. Ridgely, John Sevier, Adam Seybert, Philip Stuart, Lewis B. Sturges, Samuel Taggart, Benjamin Tallmadge, Laban Wheaton, Leonard White, David R. Williams, and Thomas Wilson. NArs—Willis Alston, jun., William Anderson, Stevenson Archer, Daniel Avery, David Bard, Josiah Bartlett, Burwell Bassett, William Blackledge, Thomas Blount, Adam Boyd, Robert Brown, William A. Burwell, Wm. Butler, John C. Calhoun, Langdon Cheves, Lewis Condit, William Crawford, Roger Davis, John Dawson, Joseph Desha, Elias Earle, James Fisk, Meshack Franklin, Thomas Gholson, Peterson Goodwyn, Isaiah L. Green, Felix Grundy, John A. Harper, Jacob Hufty, John M. Hyneman, Richard M. Johnson, Joseph Kent, Wm. R. King, Abner Lacock, Peter Little, William Lowndes, Aaron Lyle, George C. Maxwell, Thomas Moore, Alexander McKim, Samuel L. Mitch

ill, James Morgan, Hugh Nelson, Anthony New, Tho

mas Newton, Stephen Ormsby, William Piper, Benjamin Pond, Samuel Ringgold, John Rhea, John Roane, Jonathan Roberts, Ebenezer Sage, Ebenezer Seaver, Samuel Shaw, George Smith, Richard Stanford, Silas Stow, William Strong, Charles Turner jr., Pierre Van Cortlandt.junior, Robert Whitehill, William Widgery, Richard Winn, and Robert Wright. So the House refused to concur with the Committee of Elections. A motion was made by Mr. RANDolph, to recommit the report of the Committee of Elections, with power to send for persons and papers. The question on this motion was determined in the negative–yeas 50, nays 66, as follows: YEAs—Ezekiel Bacon, John Baker, William W. Bibb, Abijah Bigelow, Harmanus Bleecker, James Breckenridge, Elijah Brigham, Epaphroditus Champion, Martin Chittenden, John Clopton, John Davenport, jr., William Ely, James Emott, William Findley, Asa Fitch, Charles Goldsborough, Bolling Hall, Obed Hall, Aylett Hawes, Richard Jackson, jun., Philip B. Key, Lyman Law, Robert Le Roy Livingston, Nathaniel Macon, William McCoy, Samuel McKee, Arunah Metcalf, Jonathan O. Moseley, Thomas Newbold, Joseph Pearson, Israel Pickens, Timothy Pitkin, jr., James Pleasants, jr., Elisha R. Potter, Josiah Quincy, John Randolph, William Reed, Henry M. Ridgely, John Sevier, Adam Seybert, Richard Stanford, Philip Stuart, Lewis B. Sturges, George Sullivan, Samuel Taggart, Benj'n Tallmadge, Laban Wheaton, Leonard White, David R. Williams, and Thomas Wilson. NArs—Willis Alston, jr., William Anderson, Stevenson Archer, Daniel Avery, David Bard, Josiah Bartlett, Burwell Bassett, William Blackledge, Thomas Blount, Adam Boyd, Robert Brown, William A. Burwell, Wm. Butler, John C. Calhoun, Langdon Cheves, Thomas B. Cooke, Lewis Condit, William Crawford, Roger Davis, John Dawson, Joseph Desha, Elias Earle, James Fisk, Meshack Franklin, Thomas Gholson, Peterson Goodwyn, Isaiah L. Green, Felix Grundy, John

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A. Harper, Jacob Hufty, John M. Hyneman, Richard M. Johnson, Joseph Kent, William R. King, Abner Lacock, Peter Little, William Lowndes, Aaron Lyle, Geo. C. Maxwell, Thomas Moore, Alexander McKim, Sam’l L. Mitchill, James Morgan, Hugh Nelson, Anthony New, Thomas Newton, Stephen Ormsby, William Piper, Benjamin Pond, Samuel Ringgold, John Rhea, John Roane, Jonathan Roberts, Ebenezer Sage, Ebenezer Seaver, Samuel Shaw, George Smith, Silas Stow, William Strong, Uri Tracy, Charles Turner, jun., Pierre Wan Cortlandt, jun., Robert Whitehill, William Widgery, Richard Winn, and Robert Wright. A motion was then made by Mr. Gholson, that the House do come to the following resolutions: 1. Resolved, That John P. Hungerford is not entitled to a seat in this House. 2. Resolved, That John Taliaferro is entitled to a seat in this House. The question on the first resolution was determined in the affirmative—yeas 67, nays 29, as follows: Ykas—Willis Alston, jun., William Anderson, Stevenson Archer, Daniel Avery, Ezekiel Bacon, David Bard, Josiah Bartlett, Burwell Bassett, William Blackledge, Thomas Blount, Adam Boyd, Robert Brown, William A. Burwell, William Butler, John C. Calhoun, Langdon Cheves, Lewis Condit, William Crawford, Roger Davis, John Dawson, Joseph Desha, Elias Earle, James Fisk, Meshack Franklin, Thomas Gholson, Peterson Goodwyn, Isaiah L. Green, Felix Grundy, Jacob Husty, John M. Hyneman, Rich'd M. Johnson, Joseph Kent, William R. King, Abner Lacock, Peter Little, William Lowndes, Aaron Lyle, George C. Maxwell, Thomas Moore, Alexander McKim, Samuel L. Mitchill, James Morgan, Hugh Nelson, Anthony New, Thos. Newbold, Thomas Newton, Stephen Ormsby, Israel Pickens, William Piper, Benjamin Pond, Samuel Ringgold, John Rhea, John Roane, Jonathan Roberts, Ebenezer Sage, Ebenezer Seaver, Samuel Shaw, George Smith, Richard Stanford, Silas Stow, William Strong, Charles Turner, jr., Pierre Van Cortlandt, jr., Robert Whitehill, William Widgery, Richard Winn, and Robert Wright. Nars—William W. Bibb, Abijah Bigelow, Elijah Brigham, John Clopton, John Davenport, jr., William Ely, James Emott, Asa Fitch, Bolling Hall, Aylett Hawes, Lyman Law, Robert Le Roy Livingston, Nathaniel Macon, Jonathan O. Moseley, Timothy Pitkin, junior, James Pleasants, junior, Elisha R. Potter, Josiah Quincy, John Randolph, William Reed, Henry M. Ridgely, Adam Seybert, Philip Stuart, Lewis B. Sturges, Benjamin Tallmadge, Laban Wheaton, Leonard White, David R. Williams, and Thomas Wilson. The question on the second resolution was determined in the affirmative–yeas 66, nays 19, as follows: YEAs—Willis Alston, jun., William Anderson, Stevenson Archer, Daniel Avery, Ezekiel Bacon, David Bard, Burwell Bassett, William Blackledge, Thomas Blount, Adam Boyd, Robert Brown, William A. Burwell, Wm, Butler, John C. Calhoun, Langdon Cheves, Lewis Condit, William Crawford, Roger Davis, John Dawson, Joseph Desha, Elias Earle, James Fisk, Meshack Franklin, Thomas Gholson, Peterson Goodwyn, Isaiah L. Green, Felix Grundy, Jacob Huffy, John M. Hyneman, Richard M. Johnson, Joseph Kent, William R. King, Abner Lacock, Peter Little, Wm. Lowndes, Aaron Lyle, George C. Maxwell, Thomas Moore, Alex.

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ander McKim, Samuel L. Mitchill, James Morgan, Hugh Nelson, Anthony New, Thomas Newbold, Thomas Newton, Stephen Ormsby, Israel Pickens, William Piper, Benjamin Pond, Samuel Ringgold, John Rhea, John Roane, Jonathan Roberts, Ebenezer Sage, Ebenezer Seaver, Samuel Shaw, George Smith, Richard Stanford, Silas Stow, William Strong, Charles Turner, jr., Pierre Van Cortlandt, jr., Robert Whitehill, William Widgery, Richard Winn, and Robert Wright. Nars—William W. Bibb, Elijah Brigham, John Clopton, Bolling Hall, Aylett Hawes, Lyman Law, Robert Le Roy Livingston, Nathaniel Macon, Jonathan O. Moseley, James Pleasants, jr., John Randolph, William Reed, Henry M. Ridgely, Adam Seybert, Philip Stuart, Laban Wheaton, Leonard White, David R. Williams, and Thomas Wilson.

Monday, December 2. John TALIAFERRo, who has been declared entitled to a seat in this House, as one of the members for Virginia, in the place of John P. Hungerford, who has been declared not entitled to a seat in this House, appeared, was qualified, and took his seat. Mr. Lewis presented a petition of sundry inhabitants of the City of Washington, praying that certain amendments therein mentioned, may be | made to the act incorporating the City of Washington.—Referred. r. Newton, from the Committee of Commerce and Manufactures, to whom were referred the petitions of Isaac Clason and Archibald McCall, presented a bill authorizing the issuing of debentures in certain cases; which was read twice, and committed to a Committee of the Whole on Fridav next. r. LAcock presented a petition of sundry members of several Christian denominations, residing in the western parts of the United Stat praying that post offices may not be opened, . that the mails o not be carried, on Sundays. The Speaker laid before the House sundry resolutions adopted at a meeting of a number of inhabitants of Gloucester county, in the State of New Jersey, expressive of their disapprobation of the conduct of the Government of Great Britain, of their confidence in, and attachment to, the pres: ent Administration of the General Government, and of their support of such measures as may be adopted for the defence of the honor and interests of the United States. The resolutions were read and ordered to lie on the table. Mr. Gold, from the committee to whom was recommitted the bill for the more convenient taking of affidavits and bail, in civil causes depending in the courts of the United States, reported an amendment thereto; which was read, and, together with the bill committed to a Committee of the Whole on Wednesday next. Mr. Bassett, from the committee appointed to prepare and report such standing rules and orders as are proper, to be observed in this House, made a report; which was read and committed to a Committee of the Whole on Friday next.

Mr. MoRRow, from the Committee on the Pub

December, 1811.

lic Lands, to whom was committed, the amendment of the Senate to the bill “extending the time for opening the several land offices established in the Territory of Orleans,” reported the agreement of the committee to the said amendment. The amendment was then read, and concurred in by the House. The bill from the Senate, “making a further appropriation for the support of a library,” was read twice, and committed to a Committee of the Whole to-morrow. - The House resolved itseif into a Committee of the Whole on the bill allowing further time for completing the payments on certain lands held by right of pre-emption in the Mississippi Territory; which was gone through, reported to the House, and ordered to be engrossed for a third reading, The House went into a Committee of the Whole, on the bill for the relief of Thomas and John Clifford of Philadelphia, and Charles Wirgman of Baltimore. The Committee, after some discussion on the bill, rose, reported progress, and asked leave to sit again, which was refused; and on motion of Mr. D. R. Williams, the bill was recommitted to the Committee of Commerce and Manufactures. The House again went into Committee of the Whole, on the bill to authorize the laying out a public road from the line established by the Treaty of Greenville, to the North Bend of the Ohio; which was reported to the House, by whom it was ordered to be engrossed for a third reading.

Tuesday, December 3.

Mr. Dawson, from the committee appointed on the nineteenth ultimo, presented a bill for the relief of the infirm, disabled, and superannuated officers and soldiers of the late and of the present Army of the United States; which was read twice, and committed to a Committee of the Whole on Monday next. On motion of Mr. RANDolph, the committee appointed to inquire into the faithful application of public moneys, were authorized and empowered to send for persons and papers. On motion of Mr. Newton, the Committee of Commerce and Manufactures were instructed to inquire whether any, and, if any, what, altera. tions and amendments are necessary to be made in the several acts of Congress establishing ports of entry and delivery. An engrossed bill “allowing a further time for completing the payments on certain lands, held by right of pre-emption, in the Mississippi Terri. tory,” was read the third time, and passed. he House resolved itself into a Committee of the Whole on the bill from the Senate, “to authorize the surveying and making of certain roads in the State of Ohio, as contemplated by the Treaty of Brownstown, in the Territory of Michigan.” The bill was reported without amendment, and ordered to a third reading to-morrow. The House resolved itself into a Committee of the Whole on the bill from the Senate, “making a further appropriation for the support of a libra

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| fications of those who may vote at elections for

members of the General Assembly. That section has been opposed, as if the qualifications of an elector were confined to freehold only; but the qualification of freehold is not the only one, as will appear by reference to that part of the section which is moved to be struck out; it is in the following words: “Every free white man of the “age of twenty-one years, being an inhabitant of • the Territory, and possessing a freehold in the ‘county, and every free white man of the age of “twenty-one years, being an inhabitant of any ‘county therein, one year preceding the day of ‘election, shall be entitled to vote in that county,

| “for a representative, or representatives to the

‘General Assembly.” The section declares two modes of qualification, one is a freehold (or estate in see) in the county, and the other is, the being an inhabitant in the county for one year next preceding the day of election. If, pursuant to a motion that has been made, the word freehold be struck out of the section, the privilege of voting will be restrained, for in that case, a man by being vested with a fee will not be entitled to vote, and his exclusion cannot be bottomed on any rational principle. If a citizen of the United States will move to the Territory of Louisiana, and there purchase land, and settle thereon, and become vested with the complete title thereof, be the quantity what it may, there is no good reason to exclude him from voting at an election, immediately after he has obtained a title for his land; by his purchasing land, settling thereon, and acquiring a title thereto, he has given the strongest evidence in his power of his determination to be an inhabitant of that country, and of his attachment thereto ; an evidence far superior to that which arises from the payment of a tax only; for a man who is only a transitory resident, by being there at the time, may pay, or be compelled to pay a tax merely personal, his name having been reported on a tax list, and after the tax is paid, and a vote by him rendered, may immediately go off for some other country. The Territory of Louisiana being on the frontier, remote and exposed, a resi

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dence of one year in any county therein, next receding the day of election, may not be too ong to privilege a man, not possessed of land in fee, to vote at elections; that period of time is not more than sufficient to manifest an attachment to the country. It will also follow, as a matter of course, that if a man has been an inhabitant of a county for one year preceding the day of an election, he will have paid a tax, if there i. a law in that Territory providing for payment of a personal tax; and if there, be no such law, the qualification arising from payment of a tax only will operate strangely at the first election, if not at any other subsequent. The qualifications of electors, provided for in the bill, will guard against impositions, and such intrusion will be more easily detected; this will appear more necessary, when it is considered, that this bill is in the nature of a compact between the United States and the people of Louisiana.

But a motion has been made to strike out all that part of the sixth section which defines the qualifications of electors, and to insert in place thereof, the following: “Every free white male citizen residing in the said Territory, who shall have attained to the age of twenty-one years, and paid a tax.” If this proposed amendment be agreed to, the elective franchise provided for in the bill, will be strangely restrained; for that arising from a freehold only will be excluded, as also that arising from being an inhabitant for one year preceding the day of election, and the only one will be that arising from being a citizen and payment of tax. That the proposed amendment is indefinite and uncertain will further apear, by inquiring who are they who, being inso of the Territory of Louisiana, are entitled to be named citizens? And who are they, who, being citizens and having paid tax, shall be entitled to vote at elections? I do not

undertake, said Mr. R., to answer these ques

tions. By the offered amendment, it seems an elector must be a citizen and have paid tax. That is, an elector is a citizen who has paid tax. It may not be useless to inquire whether all the free male white inhabitants of the age of twentyone years,in the Territory of Louisiana, are embraced by the word citizen. In respect to the term or word citizen, it is amply provided for in the ninth section, which is in the words following:

“And be it further enacted, That all and every free white male person, who, on the 20th day of December, in the year one thousand eight hundred and three, was an inhabitant of the Territory of Louisiana, and all free white male citizens of the United States, who, since the said twentieth day of December, in the year one thousand eight hundred and three, emigrated, or who hereafter may emigrate to the said Territory, being otherwise qualified according to the provisions of this act, shall be capable to hold any office of honor, trust, or profit, in the said Territory, under the United States, or under said Territory, and to vote for members of the General Assembly, and a delegate to Congress, during the temporary government provided for by this act.”

By the term citizen is understood, a man who

a

is in possession and exercise of every right and privilege declared by the Constitution and laws of the States of which he is an inhabitant, and the Constitution and laws of the United States, to be his. If time would permit, it might be inquired, whether a citizen of a State removing to a Territory of the United States under the first grade of government, and becoming an inhabiitant thereof, will remain vested with all the rights and privileges of a citizen of the United States? But this is only noted for consideration. It may be observed, that a right to vote for a representative in a General Assembly, and to be represented in a General Assembly, are attributes of a citizen, and at present no free white male inhabitant in Louisiana is vested with these attributes, for the people of Louisiana have not heretofore been represented in a General Assembly, and the object of the bill is to give certain rights and privileges, which they have not at any time heretofore been in the possession and exercise of. If the definition given of the term “citizen” be correct, and it is presumed to be so, it is evident that all the free white male inhabitants of that Territory are not embraced by that term “citizen,” and it will follow, that if the proposed amendment be agreed to, a large portion, if not all, of the free white male inhabitants, will, by force of the term “citizen,” be excluded from voting for members of the General Assembly, and in that event the offered amendment, be it agreed to, will defeat the very object of the bill, for then there may be no General Assembly... But that portion of the people of that Territory

who were inhabitants thereof on the 20th day of

December, in the year one thousand eight hundred and three, are not included in the definition given of the term “citizen ;” for they are not citizens of any State, and, consequently, not of the United States; they, therefore, may, by force of that term “citizen,” be excluded from voting for representatives in a General Assembly. Taking this into view, the committee who reported the bill made particular provision in the ninth section thereof, for that portion of the people of Louisiana, and also for citizens of the United States, who, since the said 20th day of December, have emigrated, or who hereafter may emigrate, to that Territory. Let the offered amendment be rejected, and let the provisions of the sixth and ninth sections of the bill remain as they are, and their joint operation on all persons claiming a right to vote, and then no doubt or difficulty will be made relative to the qualifications of electors; he who is invested with a fee in land, if contested, will produce his title deeds; and he who claims a right to vote, by being an inhabitant of the county one year next preceding the day of election, will, if disputed, show that he has so been an inhabitant; and if there be in either case a failure, the offered vote will be rejected. It has been observed that, if the offered amendment be not agreed to, “a person may vote in two different counties at one election.” This will not follow from the relative totals used in the sixth section; the words “the' and “that” are used in

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relation to the county wherein the elector shall vote, and their relative force will, with common care and attention, exclude any person from voting in two counties. It has also been objected that “Spaniards may come and vote at elections in Louisiana, under the provisions of the bill.” If by the word “Spaniards” is intended persons who were inhabitants of the country now the Territory of Louisiana, on the 20th day of December, in the year one thousand eight hundred and three, or if by it is intended persons, who, emigrating to any of the United States, and therein residing until naturalized by law, and vested with the rights as well as name of citizen, and who, since the said twentieth day of December, have emigrated, or may emigrate, to that Territory, the objection is harmless, being without foundation; for an object of the ninth section is to embrace all persons of either description, they being otherwise qualified as provided for in the sixth section. If by the word “Spaniards” is intended persons of any other character or description, they are *:::: excluded by the provisions of the ninth and sixth sections of the bill, which will evidently appear by a very moderate share of attention thereto. It has been intimated that, if this bill becomes a law, it will encourage intruders to enter upon the lands of the United States; this objection is not sustainable. There are laws of the United States to expel intruders from the public lands. When the second grade of temporary government was extended respectively to the people of the Northwestern Territory, to the people of the Indiana and Mississippi Territories, were there no intruders on public lands within the limits of any of those Territories? Will it be said there were none? And, is it now come to this, that the numerous population of the Territory of Louisiana shall be prevented from having a general representation and General Assembly of their own, to make laws for themselves, and to have every benefit resulting therefrom ; and all this for fear that a poor man, destitute of wealth, shall, with his wife and children, go on and cultivate a small piece of public land to raise bread for his children, some one of whom, at a future day, may stand highly eminent in the Congress of the United States? Petitions for the second grade of temporary overnment have for some time been before the ongress of the United States from the people of Louisiana. By the late census **. that the people are now more than — thousand. To the people of other Territories, when composed of very inferior numbers, the second grade of temporary government has been extended—and certainly the people of Louisiana, in respect to their population, and in pursuance of the Treaty of Paris, are entitled to the consideration of the Congress of the United States. o The Committee rose,and had leave to sit again.

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of Thomas O'Bannon;” and have passed the bill from this House “for the apportionment of Representatives among the several States according to the third enumeration,” with amendments; to which bill and amendments they desire the concurrence of this House. . On motion of Mr. Williams, the Committee of Commerce and Manufactures were instructed to report a bill explanatory of the act laying duties on manufactured copper. Another message from the Senate informed the House that the Senate have passed a bill “making further provision for the Corps of Engineers;” to which bill they desire the concurrence of this House. They have agreed to the resolution of this House for the appointment of a joint committee to have the application of the moneys apropriated for the library; and have appointed § Leib, Mr. SMITH of Maryland, and Mr. ConDIT, to be of the committee on their part. The SPEAKER laid before the House a report of the Secretary of the Navy of moneys transferred during the last recess of Congress, from

certain branches of expenditure to other branches

of expenditure in the Navy Department, and of the application of such moneys; which was read, and referred to the Committee of Ways and Means.

APPORTIONMENT BILL.

The House proceeded to consider the amendments of the Senate to the bill “for the of. ment of Representatives among the several States, according to the third enumeration:” Mr. Burwell moved that the bill and amendments be committed to a Committee of the Whole, on Monday next; which was negatived. Mr. RANDolph moved that the bill and amendments be postponed until Friday next; which was also determined in the negative. Mr. STAN Ford moved, that the further consideration thereof be postponed until to-morrow ; which was determined in the negative–yeas 56, nays 72, as follows: YEAs—Willis-Alston, jr., John Baker, David Bard, Burwell Bassett, William W. Bibb, William Blackledge, Thomas Blount, James Breckenridge, Robert Brown, William A. Burwell, John Clopton, Lewis Condit, William Crawford, John Dawson, Meshack Franklin, Thomas Gholson, Charles Goldsborough, Peterson Goodwyn, Edwin Gray, Felix Grundy, Obed Hall, Aylett Hawes, Jacob Hufty, Joseph Kent, Philip B. Key, William R. King, Abner Lacock, Joseph Lefever, Joseph Lewis, jr., Peter Little, Nathaniel Macon, George C. Maxwell, Archibald McBryde, William McCoy, Samuel McKee, Alexander McKim, James Morgan, Jeremiah Morrow, Hugh Nelson, Thomas Newton, Stephen Ormsby, Joseph Pearson, Israel Pickens, William Piper, James Pleasants, jr., John Randolph, Samuel Ringgold, John Rhea, John Roane, Jonathan Roberts, Richard Stanford, Philip Stuart, John Taliaferro, Robert Whitehill, Thomas Wilson, and Richard Winn. Nars—William Anderson, Stevenson Archer, Daniel Avery, Ezekiel Bacon, Josiah Bartlett, Abijah Bigelow, Harmanus Bleecker, Adam Boyd, Elijah Brigham, William Butler, John C. Calhoun, Epaphroditus Cham

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