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to disrupt that organization. A general strike was ordered at a mass meeting of the workmen, held under the auspices of the Suspender Makers' Union, on the twenty-third of August, and the next day the operatives employed in about twenty-five of the principal factories went on strike. The union, at the same time, demanded an increase of wages. Several employers acceded to this demand, but the principal manufacturers refused to grant any concessions to their workmen. On the twenty-ninth of September the strike was abandoned.

TAILORS.
Brooklyn.

About the 1st of September, 1892, a small number of pantsmakers, who were employed in a shop at 56 Gerry street, Brooklyn, struck for an increase of wages. The strike lasted only a few days and resulted in favor of the employes.

Mount Vernon.

On the eleventh of May twenty-two operatives, employed in the manufacture of mackintosh garments in a factory at Mount Vernon, went on strike because one of their fellow workmen had been discharged. They alleged, as another grievance, that the superintendent of the factory had ordered them to withdraw from their union. The proprietors of the factory informed certain operatives that they could return to work, but refused to re-employ others. The strike was not successful.

New York.

On the 15th of December, 1891, twenty-five operatives who were employed in a shop on Attorney street, New York, went on strike. They claimed that their wages had been reduced and that the number of working hours per day had been increased. Their places were filled by non-union workmen.

About the same time similar causes led to a strike in a shop on Clinton street. In answer to inquiries made by the Board, the employer stated that he went to the union and asked that his

employes return to work; that they refused to comply with his request, and he then employed non-union tailors.

In March, 1892, the Pants Makers' Union demanded that the contractors furnish work to no operator, baster or presser who was not a member of the union; and that they reduce the hours of labor and grant a ten per cent. advance in wages. These demands were embodied in an agreement which the contractors refused to sign, and on the fourteenth of March 500 pantsmakers went on strike. Within twelve hours after the strike commenced a majority of the contractors acceded to the demands of the union, and on the fifteenth and sixteenth of March all the other contractors made similar concessions.

In the latter part of April ninety coatmakers, employed in two shops in New York city, went on strike in order to enforce their demands for an increase of wages and a reduction of the hours of labor from twelve to ten per day. These strikes lasted three or four weeks, and finally resulted in favor of the employes.

On or about the tenth of June the journeymen tailors employed in a custom tailoring shop in New York city went on strike because of a reduction of wages. On the fourteenth of June their employer restored the old rate of wages, and the strike was declared off.

About the tenth of July the Journeymen Tailors' Protective and Benevolent Union ordered a strike against a merchant tailor whose place of business is at 241 Fifth avenue. A recent reduction of wages constituted their principal grievance. The strike continued without any material change until the eighth of August, when the employer sent for a committee of his workmen, and opened negotiations for a settlement of the difficulty. The parties to the controversy agreed to submit the question of wages to a joint arbitration committee, composed of three members of the Merchants Tailors' Exchange and three members of the Journeymen Tailors' Protective and Benevolent Union. In accordance with the decision of this joint committee, the employer agreed to pay the scale of wages in force in 1886, and his employes returned to work.

On the fourth of August about 1,000 knee-pants makers went on strike, in order to compel their employers, the contractors, to furnish sewing machines, without charge, instead of requiring the operators to hire or own the machines, as had formerly been the custom. Work was suspended in the shops of about 100 contractors, nearly all of whom acceded to the demands of their employes, within a few days after the strike commenced.

On the fourteenth of August twenty contractors violated this agreement by requiring their employes to furnish their own machines. The strike was renewed, as against these contractors, and the operators succeeded in forcing them to abide by the terms of the agreement.

On the nineteenth of September the Journeymen Tailors' Protective and Benevolent Union ordered a strike against a merchant tailor, whose place of business is at 255 Fifth avenue, because he refused to pay the union scale of wages. This strike is now pending.

This union ordered a few other strikes against employers who refused to pay the union scale of wages, and in each case the union was successful.

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THEATRICAL EMPLOYES.
New York,

In November, 1891, the scene shifters employed in the New York theaters demanded an increase of wages, and a committee of the Theatrical Protective Union held conference with several of the managers. The results of this conference were not satisfactory to the union, and on the night of November seventeenth the scene shifters in five theaters went on strike. The next day the executive committee of the union met a committee of the managers' association, and all differences were amicably adjusted.

Syracuse.

In September, 1892, the stage hands employed in two theaters in Syracuse went on strike in order to secure recognition of their union. This strike has not been settled.

TIN AND SHEET-IRON WORKERS.

Brooklyn.

On the thirtieth of April 350 workmen, employed in the stumping works at Union avenue and North Second street, Brooklyn, went on strike. They complained of the overbearing manner of the new superintendent of the works, who had been acting in that capacity only a few days. The works were operated by a trust, one of the officers of which came to Brooklyn, listened to the grievances of the employes, and discharged the new superintendent. Work was resumed on Monday, May 2.

New York.

On the fourth of November, 1891, the walking delegate of the Tin and Sheet Iron Workers' Union ordered a strike against a manufacturer of hot-air furnaces, whose place of business is at 240 East Eightieth street, New York. In response to inquiries made by the Board, the employer stated that the delegate of the union called upon him and threatened a strike if a certain nonunion employe were not discharged; that he agreed to speak to this workman, and the delegate promised to call again; and that, without any further notice, a strike was ordered the next morning. He stated, further, that the employe in question applied for admission to the union, and was rejected because he had belonged to another union, two or three years before, and had not a card from that organization. The employer engaged a number of non-union tin and sheet-iron workers on several buildings in New York city, but, through the influence of the Board of Walking Delegates of the Building Trades, they were induced to leave his employ. He finally acceded to the demand of the Tin and Sheet Iron Workers' Union, and the strike was declared off.

On or about the 25th of April, 1892, the tin and sheet-iron workers employed in a shop at 163 Pearl street struck for the union rate of wages. On the thirtieth of April their demands were granted and the strike was declared off.

UPHOLSTERERS.

New York.

On the 24th of November, 1891, Branch 1 of the United Upholsterers' Union ordered a strike in a shop at 401 Eighth street, New York, because the proprietor of the shop refused to discharge certain non-union employes. Fifteen upholsterers went on strike, and within a short time thereafter the non-union workmen were discharged.

On the first of March the upholsterers employed in a shop at 156 Hester street went on strike, in order to secure recognition of the upholsterers' union. On the fourth of March their demands were granted and the strike was declared off.

On or about the twentieth of May seventeen upholsterers, employed by a firm whose place of business is at 818 Broadway, went on strike in order to assist the cabinet makers. On the twenty-fifth of May the strike was declared off, after the firm had agreed to do no more work for any manufacturer whose cabinet workers were on strike.

Similar strikes took place in a few other shops in New York city.

On the twenty-second of June a reduction of wages led to another strike in the shop at 156 Hester street. Seven upholsterers returned to work at the reduced rate of wages, without having obtained the consent of the union. The Board has not been informed of any settlement of this strike.

At or about the same time a similar cause led to a strike in a shop at 101 Mott street. In this case the employer promptly restored the old rate of wages and his employes returned to work.

VARNISHERS.
Brooklyn.

On the twelfth of April fifty varnishers, who were employed on two buildings in course of erection in Brooklyn, went on strike. They had been receiving two dollars and fifty cents per day for

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