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REPORT.

To the Legislature :

OFFICE OF THE

BOARD OF MEDIATION AND ARBITRATION,

ALBANY, January 26, 1893.

During the year ending October 31, 1892, the Board received information of about 400 strikes and lockouts, nearly one-half of which were building trades strikes and lockouts in the cities of New York and Brooklyn. The most important of these labor difficulties were the Buffalo switchmen's strike, the lumber handlers' strike at Tonawanda, the difficulty between the fur manufacturers of New York city and their employes, and the granite cutters' and pavers' strike, which originated at the granite quarries in New England, but extended to New York city, and the effects of which were felt throughout a large portion of the country.

During the year the Board has succeeded in settling several strikes, principal among which were the strike of shoemakers in the factory of J. Wichert & Co., Brooklyn, the strike of clothing cutters in the employ of Newborg, Rosenberg & Co., of New York city, and the lumber handlers' strike at Tonawanda. On the fourth of January, 1892, 160 shoemakers employed in the factory of J. Wichert & Co., at 26 Boerum street, Brooklyn, struck on account of a reduction of wages and the introduction of new machinery. On the seventh of January, Commissioner Donovan, on behalf of the Board, met representatives of the parties to the controversy and arranged a conference between them, which was held on the eighth of January. A proposition of the employers was rejected by the employes, but another conference was held the next day and the differences were amicably adjusted.

On the first day of March, the clothing cutters in the employ of Newborg, Rosenberg & Co., of New York city, went on strike. The firm requested the intervention of the Board, and Commissioner Donovan immediately went to New York city and

made arrangements for a meeting between the employers and officers of the United Garment Workers of North America. At this meeting they agreed to submit their differences to arbitration, each party to select two arbitrators, and the four arbitrators thus chosen to select a fifth arbitrator, or umpire, whose decision would be final as to all questions upon which the others failed to Commissioner Donovan was unanimously chosen as the fifth arbitrator, and the following question was submitted to him for decision: "Shall all cutters, lining cutters and trimmers hereafter employed by said firm be union men in good standing, without regard to the organization with which they may be affiliated?".

After receiving the statements of both parties, and carefully considering the arguments presented on behalf of each of the parties to the controversy, Commissioner Donovan rendered the following decision:

STATE BOARD OF MEDIATION AND ARBITRATION. IN THE MATTER OF DIFFERENCES BETWEEN NEWBORG, ROSENBERG & Co. AND THEIR EMPLOYES.

On the twenty-ninth of February, 1892, the clothing cutters, lining cutters and trimmers in the employ of Newborg, Rosenberg & Co. presented to that firm the following communication:

"Newborg, Rosenberg & Co.:

"NEW YORK, February 27, 1892

66 Gentlemen In behalf of the cutters, lining cutters and trimmers employed by your firm, we hereby submit to you the following requests, a reply to which to be given no later than Tuesday morning, March 1, 1892:

"First. All week workers, reduced two dollars per week, to receive an advance of that amount.

"Second. All piece workers, reduced two cents per suit for cutting on men's and boys' suits, to receive a like advance; and children's suits that have been reduced one cent for cutting to receive an advance of that amount.

"Third. All cutters, lining cutters and trimmers employed in the future shall be union men in good standing.

"Fourth. There shall be no discrimination shown against employes because of the above requests.

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