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STATE OF NEW YORK

EDUCATION DEPARTMENT

Hudson-Fulton Celebration

September 25 to October 9, 1909

A BROCHURE FOR THE USE OF THE SCHOOLS OF THE
STATE COMPILED AND EDITED BY HARLAN HOYT HORNER

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THE HUDSON-FULTON CELEBRATION

BY THE COMMISSIONER OF EDUCATION

T

HE State of New York is arranging an elaborate celebration

in honor of the Hudson river and of the great events

associated with its waters and its shores. The celebration will begin on the 25th of September, 1909, and continue at different points and with varying features to the 9th of October. Wednesday, September 29th, will be the Educational day of the celebration.

The time chosen is the three hundredth anniversary of the first exploration of the river by Captain Henry Hudson, in the little sailing ship “Half Moon,” sent out by the good people of Holland. It is a little more than a hundred years from the time when Robert Fulton, in the “Clermont,” proved that steam power might be relied upon to propel boats.

The Hudson river has borne many names. Some of the Indians called it “Mah-i-can-i-tuk," which meant "the place of the Mohicans"; and others, “Ca-ho-ha-ta-tea,” or “river that flows from the mountains." The Dutch named it the "Mauritius" in honor of Prince Maurice, the great son and successor of William the Silent. The French called it “La Grande river," and the Spanish, the “River of the Mountains." The English more often gave it the name of the “North river" (the Delaware being the South river), and by that name it is frequently called now. But the popular sense of justice came to call it “Hudson's river,” and that finally settled down to the “Hudson river.” The common fairness has now been confirmed by many laws.

None of its great names has been too good for it. It is a splendid, deep, free-flowing stream. It is the outlet of great mountains and magnificent valleys. It has tides all the way to Albany. It is bordered by beautiful slopes and stately peaks ; by the Palisades, a great stone wall fifteen miles in length; and by thrifty cities and splendid residences as well. In picturesqueness, in always changing, and quickly changing, views, it is hardly equaled by any other river in America, or in the world.

It is a river which has long been useful and dear to a great and prosperous civilization.

Although Hudson sailed for the Dutch, he first made known his discovery to the English; and although the English king required him, an English subject, not to leave the English service again, the Dutch were the first to establish trading posts and

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