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arms for the King and Parliament." The king and th parliament was a phrase constantly in the mouth of th republicans, even while they were using every means t overthrow the monarchy. Through the Field Musing are scattered several interesting anecdotes of the writer military life. His colonel, he tells us, was Middleton, valiant Scot, on whose left flank he led his own troop t the charge*. His fare and lodging were of the tru martial kind; he had the open fields for his quarter: and was very happy to make a comfortable bed in " well-made barley-cock," with the starry sky for hi canopy and curtains. Yet even here, amid the din ane tumult of arms, he prophesied the fall of nations, and prepared for publication his own views of the Bible, an the mysteries of the Apocalypse.

But Wither's tergiversation did not pass unnoticed an opponent rose up in the person of the Water-poet Honest John Taylor was now at Oxford, whither he had fled from the persecutions of his enemies in London and he tells us, in that strange but amusing medley Mad verse, Sad verse, Glad verse, and Bad verse, tha upon his arrival at Oxford, he found the king and : large party of nobility in “Christ Church garden," and that the monarch, on perceiving him, immediately came towards him, and “put forth his royal hand strait," which, says Taylor, with no small exultation,

On my knees I humbly kneeld and kist. This mark of the king's favour lent a fresh vigour to his feelings, and he applied the lash with an unsparing

A description of the poet's flag is given by Prestwich in his Res. Publica, p. 35. Captain George Withers, the poet-gules; in saltier a sword bladed proper, hilted or; over which a golden pen ; over both in jess, a scroll, and thereon Pro Rege, Lege, Grege --fringed argent and rules. Son olen » 01

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Before the publication of the Field-Musings, Wither had disbanded his troop; his reasons are briefly given in the Nil Ultra

But so divisions them enraged
Who were in that contest engaged,
And such ill consequents presaged,

That I my troop did soon disband;
And hopeless I should ought essay
Successful in a martial way,
My sword and arms quite flung away,

And took my pen again in hand. He declared in "the speech without door," delivered July 9, 1644, that he had served the republic in a military capacity while he had any thing to serve it with, and had kept his horses until they had “twice eaten out their heads." A MS. note, in a contemporary band-writing in the copy of the speech among the King's pamphlets, says that the author was at the time Poet Laureat, a title never claimed or even mentioned by Wither himself.

Our poet did not again take up his sword. He had told Lord Essex in the dedication of the Field-Musings, that his pen would probably strengthen the Parliament army more than a regiment of horse; and be showed himself quite as active in one employment as he had been in the other. Polemical pens are rarely idle or exhausted. In the same year he addressed “ Letters of Advice" to all the counties and corporations of England, particularly Southampton and Surrey, "touching the choice of Knights and Burgesses ;" and in the following year he lifted up a “Voice of Peace," tending, as he hoped, to the pacification of God's wrath, and the healing of the wounded commonwealth. But they whose assistance

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Successful in a martial way,

My sword and arms quite flung away, July 9, 1644, that he had served the republic in a military capacity while he had any thing to serve it with, and had kept his horses until they had "twice maten out their beads." A MS. note, in a contemporary band-writing in the copy of the speech among the King's pamphlets, says that the author was at the time Poet

Lsureat, a title never claimed or even mentioned by

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But so divisions them enraged
Who were in that contest engaged,
And such ill consequents presaged,

That I my troop did soon disband; And hopeless I should ought essay

And took my pen again in hand. He declared in the speech without door," delivered

Wither himself,

Our poet did not again take up his sword. He had told Lord Essex in the dedication of the Field-Musings, that his pen would probably strengthen the Parliament army more than a regiment of horse; and the showed himself quite as active in one employment as be bad been in the other. Polemical pens are rarely idle or exhausted. In the same year be addressed " Letters of Advice" to all the counties and corporations of England, particularly Southampton and Surrey, "touching the choice of Knights and Burgesses;" and in the following

rear be lifted up a "Voice of Peace," tending, as be hoped, to the pacification of God's wrath, and the healing of the padded commonwealth. But they whose assistance

pamphlet to the Committee of Examinations. On th 4th of May, Mr. Whittacre and some other members o that committee were directed to send for Wither, and to inquire into the truth of his allegations. The following extract from the Journal of the House of Commons fo: the 7th of August, 1646, will not be uninteresting:

"Mr. Whittacre reports the state of the examination: concerning a pamphlet written and published by Mr George Withers, intituled Justiciarius Justificatus; and concerning a practice informed of in Mr. Withers, and onc Mr. Andrewes Burrell, of accusing Sir Richarı Onslow that he sent monies to the King at Oxon; and the several examinations, and the instances and in ferences out of them, were all read by the Reporter.

“The humble petition of George Wither was read, de siring further time to prove what he suggested in his book.

"Another humble petition of George Wither was read expressing his sorrow for his error in transgressing against the privileges of this House."

It having been resolved that the reflections upon Onslow in the Justiciarius Justificatus were unfounded • false and scandalous,' the question was “ propounded that Mr. George Wither should pay unto Sir Richard Onslow the sum of five hundred pounds for his damages."

The question being put, the House divided, and there appeared for the question 65; against it 54; leaving a majority of 11 in favour of the fine.

It was then resolved, “That the book called Justiciarius Justificatus shall be burned at Kingston upon Thames, and at Guildford, upon the market days there, by the Marshal attending the Committee at Kingston

aforesaid."

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