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lightness. He that speaks from the understa

Upon the poetical character of Quarles, needless to dwell. We may say of him, in the words of Dr. Hammond, that he was of ar habit of mind, braced into more than commc by healthful and ennobling studies, and a

There was nothing effeminat disposition; he was often ungrac

No man had a correcter notio beauty of style, or presented a more striking to his own rule :-"Clothe not thy language, " either with obscurity or affectation ; in the discoverest too much darkness, in the other, t.

virtuous life.

manners or

never weak.

against their author.

the understanding is the best interpreter." ; have been good for his fame if he had practis he taught. His eccentricity was the ruin of his he offered up the most beautiful offspring of his nation, without remorse, to this misshapen idol.

the specimens given in the foregoing pag perhaps, diminish the prejudice so long ente

They show that he coul with dignity, simplicity, and pathos, and that poetry flowed in a muddy stream, particles of p gold may be gathered from its channel.

His pencil rather “dashed" than "drew," wanted the taste and patience to finish his pi He was sublime and vulgai' at the impulse moment. Sometimes, however, images of great d fell unconsciously from his pen. Evangelus' d. tion of the appearance of the Angel in the She Oracles, may be quoted as an example:

His skin did show,
More white than ivory, or the new fall'n snow,

lipon the poetical character of Quarles, it will be

nædes o dwel. We may say of him, in the emphatie
neve" weak. No man had a correcter notion of the
beauty of style, or presented a more striking exception
to his own ruk:-"Clothe not thy language,he said,

either with obscurity or affectation; in the one thou
discoverest too much darkness, in the other, too much

chorax He that speaks from the understanding to
the understanding is the best interpreter.It would
bare we good for his fame if he bad practised what
ke taught. His eccentricity was the ruin of his genius:
ke stered up the most beautiful offspring of his imagi.
setia, without remorse, to this misshapen idol.

i be specimens given in the foregoing pages will,
penlyss diminish the prejudice so long entertained
gevinst their author. They show that he could write !
with dignity, simplicity, and pathos, and that if his
perdry lowed in a muddy stream, particles of precious
geld may be gathered from its channel.

His pencil rather "dashed" than "drew," and he
anted the taste and patience to finish his pictures.
He was sublime and vulgaiat the impulse of the

words of Dr. Hammond, that he was of an athletic

by bealthful and ennobling studies, and a pure &

moment Sometimes, bowever, images of great delicacy

201

FRANCIS QUARLES.

babit of mind, braced into more than common vigoar

and nothing effeminate in his disposition; he was often ungraceful

, but

virtuous life. There was

Whose perfect whiteness made a circling light,

That where it stood, it silvered o'er the night. As a writer of prose, he deserves very high applause. His style is remarkably flowing, and animated by a Christian benignity of spirit. Without the copious richness of Taylor, or the mystical eloquence of Brown, or the poignant terseness of South, he possesses sufficient force and sweetness to entitle him to a seat in the midst of these great masters of our language. Quarles was not only a fruitful author; he was also a learned and laborious student, and while Secretary to Archbishop Usher, contributed materially to promote the progress of his theological researches. This interesting fact has, I believe, never been noticed; but Usher alludes to his services in a letter to G. Vossius, and speaks of him as a poet held in considerable esteem, among his own countrymen, for his sacred compositions *.

Of the widow of Quarles, no records exist. With what patience she endured the loss of one whom she so tenderly loved, or how long she survived him, we know not; but we may be assured that the blow was tempered to her strength, and that her husband's dying words, that God would be a husband to the widow, received a full and merciful fulfilment.

Of the poet's numerous family, John is alone rememhered. He was born in Essex, and afterwards became, Wood says, a member of Exeter College, Oxford, where he bore arms for the King in the garrison of the town;

• The letter is printed in the appendix to Parr's life of the Archbishop, p. 484. I he passage referring to Quarles is as follows:" Ut autem intelligas quibus in Locis Cottonianum Libri primi et tertü Chronicon a vulgato differat; Florentinum Wigorniensem nuac ad te mitto, quem Francisci Quarlesii Opera, qui mihi tum erut ab Epistolis (vir ob sacr«tiorem poenin apud Anglos suns non incelebris) cum illo conferendum curavi ad annum DCCCC. Dionysianum a quo quatenus prius missu initium duxit."

Junconsciously from his pen. Evangelus' descrip ther of the appearance of the Angel in the Shepherd i Padas , may be quoted as an example:

His skin did show, then irery, or the new fall'n snow,

but it is not clear that he ever belonged to th
sity. We find, from his own relation, tha
indebted for his education to Archbishop
whose house he appears to have resided.

That little education I dare own
I had, I'm proud to say, from him alone.
His grave advice would oftentimes distill
Into my ears, and captivate my will.
The example of his life did every day

Afford me lectures *. Upon the decease of this prelate, to whom sincerely attached, he composed an elegy begin those beautiful lines :

Then weep no more; see how his peaceful br
Rock'd by the hand of death, takes quiet rest.
Disturb him not; but let him sweetly take

A full repose ; he hath been long awake. The feet of Sion's watchman must have bee and his eyes heavy with sleep! offered any hopes of a prosperous issue, John continued an active and faithful servant of the whose army he obtained the rank of captain ; b the strength of the loyalists was exhausted repeated victories of the Parliament, he “re London in a mean condition," and about 164 farewell to England, and went abroad, but i capacity Wood was ignorant. Upon his ret supported himself by his pen, until he was swep in the plague of 1665. The place of his b unknown. His compositions were very numerou by some he was

esteemed a good poet," deficient in the power and originality of his fathe

• Ao Elegie on the most Reverend and learned James U Archbishop of Armagh, 1656.

While the roy

sity. We find, from his own relation, that he was
indebted for his education to Archbishop Usher, in
Fhar house he appears to have resided.

That lide education I dare own
Upon the decease of this prelate, to whom he was

sazrely attached, he composed an elegy beginning with
ofered any hopes of a prosperous issue, John Quarles
continued an active and faithful servant of the king, in
the strength of the loyalists was exhausted by the
mated victories of the Parliament, he "retired to

The example of his life did every day

Racid by the hand of death, takes quiet rest.

The let of Sion's watchman must have been weary,

farewell to England, and went abroad, but in what

supported bimself by his pen, until he was swept away

FRANCIS QUARLES.

but it is not clear that he ever belonged to the Univer

I had. I'm proud to say, from him alone.
His grace advice would oftentimes distill
Into my ears, and captivate my will.

Aford me lectures,

this beautiful lines :

Then weep no more ; see how his peaceful breast,

Disturb him not; but let him sweetly take
A full repose ; he hath been long awake.

and his eyes beavy with sleep! While the royal cause

be obtained the rank of captain ; but when

in a mean condition," and about 1649 bade

London

Wood was ignorant. Upon his return he

apacity

e dibe plague of 1665. The place of his burial is sakdown. His compositions were very numerous, and by somme he was "esteemed a good poet," though deficient in the power and originality of his father.

the most Reverend and learned James Usher, L.

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