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published a malza d Miscellanies in 1645, under the

e timer lode, containing, among other
fele barbondation, he speaks of the divine

peremos a conéis of devotions, in imitation of the 119th
Mis Hertet survived her husband, and "continued,
077 Waku, bis disconsolate widow about six years,
extra and time had so moderated her sorrows that
ste keuze hbe happy wife of Sir Robert Cook, of
Bahane, in the county of Gloucester. But she never
dazu no mention the name of Mr. George Herbert, and
say the name must live in her memory till she pot of
avalt." She also "preserved many of Mr. Herbert's
mint sriting, which she intended to make public;
dy and Highnam House were burnt together by

kit rebels, and so lost to posterity." Aubrey's
2000 of their disappearance is not so satisfactory.

no Sir Robert Cook) condemned to the use of and bozsewitery. This intelligence was communicated

Langforal, and complaining that she had lost

Perast, be says, wrote a folio, in Latin, which, because

bestem, whom he had desired to ask his mother-in-law

HABINGTON, VAUGHAN, &c.

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Thus she continued, "till con

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WILLIAM HABINGTON was born at Hendlip, in Worcestershire, on the 4th or 5th of November, 1605. His name has derived an historical interest from the imputed connexion of his father with the Gunpowder Plot, some of the agents of which he was accused of concealing in his house. But this charge rests on very doubtful authority; and Mr. Nash, the author of the History of Worcestershire, discovered at Hendlip several letters, written by Habington to his wife and friends, declaring his entire ignorance of the conspiracy. William was educated at St. Omer's, and afterwards at Paris. To relieve himself from the solicitations of the Jesuits, who sought to win him to their order, he returned to England, and finished his studies under the direction of his father, who was a scholar and a man of industry. Through the care of bis affectionate tutor, he "grew into an accomplished gentleman;" and at an early age married Lucia, daughter of Lord Powis, and who is said by Winstanley, to have been a lady of rare endowments and beauty. Habington seems to have appreciated his good fortune, and to have taken no part in the political tuinults which so afflicted his country. The insinuation of Wood, that he “did run with the times, and was not unknown to Oliver, the Usurper," is refuted by the character of his poetry, and the nature of his creed. There could be no bond of union between the papist and the puritan. He died November 30, 1654*, and was buried in the family vault at Hendlip.

Chaimers says, November 13th, 1645; but he gives no reason for rejecting the daie of Anthony Wood, who received bis information from the poet's son.

of Hinebam could not read, his widow (then

o subres by Mr. Arnold Cook, one of the sons of Sir

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Egerton Bridges bas given copious extracto from this volume, a part of James, 460., p. 349, &c.

Time has dealt less barshly with his rhymes than v those of more gifted bards. His poems have been tv

press afterwards bound

repriated within a few years; by Chalmers, in the Bri Poets, and separately, by C. A. Elton, at Bristol. His opinion of their merits was very humble. They were first privately circulated among his friends, and tered into many loose papers." “Had I slept," he sa "in the silence of my acquaintance, and affected study beyond what the chase or field allows, poetry E then been no scandal upon me, and the love of learn no suspicion of ill husbandry. If these lines want t courtship which insinuates itself into the favour of gr men, best, they partake of my modesty; if satire, to applause with the envious multitude, they express content, which maliceth none the fruition of that the estecm happy. The great charm of his writings is th purity and domestic tenderness; the religion of fancy is never betrayed into any unbecoming mirth, rapturous enthusiasm. He is always amiable, simp and unaffected: if he has not the ingenuity of some baubles. His prose, however, excels his verse. The ch racter of a Holy Man will be accepted by all Christia

together what fancy had so his rivals, he is also free from their conceits. Gold ceas to be of any real value when it is only fashioned in as a delightful portrait of sincere and tolerant piety.

A HOLY MAN
Is only happy, for infelicity and sin were born twins ; or rathe

prodigy with two bodies, both draw and expire tł same breath. Catholic faith is the foundation on which ! erects Religion, knowing it a ruinous madness to build in the air of a private spirit, or on the sands of any new schism. H impiety is not so bold as to bring divinity down to the mistak of reason, or to deny those mysteries his apprehension reachet

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like some

Time has dat as kesks with his rhymes than with
these do mar que dura His poems have been twice
Mans, and ezuztah, C A. Elton, at Bristol. His own
punta adher' Bamba was very humble. They were at
ist printy anubid among his friends, and the
penso alternard Sund" together what fancy had scat-
Kred into muy lase papers." "Had I slept," he says,

te slar d' my acquaintance, and affected no
stond denne start the chase or field allows, poetry had
Ata kus saadal upon me, and the love of learning
aynia d' il busbandry. If these lines want that
suzely relich insinuates itself into the favour of great
as y puertake of my modesty; if satire, to win

spalay sith the envious multitude, they express my
rent and domestic tenderness; the religion of his

ori mer betrayed into any unbecoming mirth, or
soprak he is also free from their conceits. Gold ceases
oped any real value when it is only fashioned into
Amber His prose, however, excels his verse. The cha.
sarda Holy Man will be accepted by all Christians
ay dappy, for infelicity and sin were born twins; or rather,
enerze prodigy with two bodies, both draw and expire the

may sheh maliceth none the fruition of that they

uterus enthusiasm. He is always amiable, simple,

ottalightral portrait of sincere and tolerant piety.

FADINGTON,

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not. His obedience mores still by direction of the magistrate; and should conscience inform him that the command is unjust, be judgeth it nevertheless high treason, by rebellion, to make good his tenets; as it were the basest cowardice, by dissimulation of religion, to preserve temporal respects. He knows human policy but a crooked rule of action, and, therefore, by a distrust of his own knowledge, attains it; confounding with supernatural illumination, the opinionated judgment of the wise. In prosperity he greatly admires the bounty of the Almighty Giver, and useth, not abuseth, plenty; but in adversity he remains unshaken, and, like some eminent mountain, hath his head above the clouds. For his happiness is not meteorlike, exhaled from the vapours of this world, but it shines a fixe star, which when by misfortune it appears to fall, only casts away the slimy matter. Poverty he neither fears nor covets, but cheerfully entertains, imagining it the fire which tries virtue; nor how tyrannically soever it usurp on him doth he pay to it a sigh or wrinkle; for he who suffers want without reluctancy, may be poor, not miserable. He sees the covetous prosper by usury, yet waxeth not lean with envy; and when the posterity of the impious flourish, he questions not the Divine justice; for temporal rewards distinguish not ever the merits of men.

• Fame he weighs not, but esteems a smoke, yet such as carries with it the sweetest odcur, and riseth usually from the sacrifice of our best actions. Pride he disdains, when he finds it swelling in himself, but easily forgiveth it in another. * He doth not malice the over-spreading growth of bis equals, but pities, not despiseth, the fall of any man; esteeming yet no storm of fortune dangerous, but what is raised through our own demerit.

• In conversation, his carriage is neither plausible to flattery, nor reserved to rigour, but he so demeans himself as created for society. In solitude he remembers his better pert is angelical, and, therefore, his mind practiseth the best discourse without assistance of inferior organs! He is never merry, but still modest; not dissolved into indecent laughter, or tickled with wit, scurrilous or injurious. He cunningly searcheth into the virtues of others, and liberally commends them; but buries the vices of the imperfect in a cha

The great charm of his writings is their

of if he has not the ingenuity of some

A HOLY MAN

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breath. Catholic faith is the foundation on which he

Religion, knowing it a ruinous madness to build in the pita private spirit

, or on the sands of any new schism. His is not so bold as to bring divinity down to the mistake

musterjes his apprehension reacbeth

he esteems it a place he is condemned to.

he labours not the opinion, so he fears not the scandal of thought good. He every day travels his meditations Heaven, and never finds himself wearied with the jou live he knows a benefit, and the contempt of it ingrat and therefore loves, but not dotes on life. Death, ho since it not annihilates but unclouds the soul. He, t fore, stands every moment prepared to die; and thoug freely yields up himself when age or sickness summon yet he with more alacrity puts off his earth when the pr his seventeenth year was entered of Jesus Coll Oxford, from whence, after a residence of two years_ was removed by his father to one of the Inns of Co in London, where he studied the law, until the cc Anthony Wood, "he was taken home by his frien

ritable silence, whose manners he reforms, not by inve but example. In prayer he is frequent, not apparent ; but when the necessities of nature return him down to formed soever an aspect it wears, he is not frighted sion of faith crowns him a martyr. HENRY VAUGHAN was born in Wales, in 1621, an mencement of the civil war, when, we are told

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and followed the pleasant paths of poetry and p lology." He afterwards applied himself to physic, a became an eminent practitioner in his native pla Thus his life glided harmlessly and beneficially awa st a distance from the miseries under which so ma of his fellow-creatures were suffering. He lived in t neighbourhood of Brecknock; and in the Olor Iscan are frequent invitations to his friends to partake of 1 rustic pleasures. He died, Wood thinks, on the 29 of April, 1695, and was buried in the parish-church Llansenfried, about two miles from Brecknock. Vaughan's poetry has never received the praise

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Farby na may alacrily puts off his earth when the profes

alandu, where he studied the law, until the com

funt an eminent practitioner in his native place.

distance from the miseries under which so many

nilable silat, rhese ster he reforms, not by inrectives hut erasple la proper he is frequent, not apparent; pet as be lakur av thy gabing so he fears not the scandal of being

hoger fud He may day travels his meditations up to Harnes, at du hade himself wearied with the journey det vibe the senectus et nature return him down to earth, drestes do plan ke is condemned to. fine the laws kastrit, and the contempt of it ingratitude, nattomis bus but not dotes on life. Death, hoe de lisad RH u aspect it wears, he is not frighted with A Í stanutes but unclouds the soul. He, there for studerary moment prepared to die; and though be

lebt u basel when age or sickness summon hin, car Kuguan was born in Wales, in 1621, and in to erstenth year was entered of Jesus College, time from whence, after a residence of two years, be

pa med by his father to one of the Inns of Court Arthur Wood, "he was taken home by his friends,

med hallowed the pleasant paths of poetry and phi. webbourhood of Brecknock; and in the Olor Iscanus Refrequent invitations to his friends to partake of his

To

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deserves. Mr. Campbell pronounces him one of the harshest of the inferior order of the school of conceit; but to his sacred poems, a milder criticism is due: they show considerable originality and picturesque grace. He was an imitator of Herbert, of whom he makes affectionate mention, and whom he resembles in the negligence of his versification, and the inappropriateness of his imagery. But he occasionally swept the harp with a master's hand: what an affecting solemnity runs through these stanzas :

They are all gone into the world of light!

And I alone sit lingering here;
Their very meinory is fair and bright,

And my sad thoughts doth clear.
It glows and glitters in my cloudy breast,

Like stars upon some gloomy grove,
Or those faint beams in which this hill is drest,

After the sun's remove.
I see them walking in an air of glory,

Whose light doth trample on my days:
My days, which are at best but dull and hoary,

Mere glimmering and decays.
O holy Hope! and high Humility,

High as the heavens above :
These are your walks, and you have show'd them me

To kindle my cold love.
Dear beauteous Death I the jewel of the just,

Shining no where but in the dark;
What mysteries do lie beyond thy dust,

Could man outlook that mark !
He that hath found some fledg d bird's nest, may know

At first sight if the bird be flown;
But what fair well, or grove, it sings in now,

That is to him unknown.

of the civil war, when, we are told by

He afterwards applied himself to physic, and

en bis life gided harmlessly and beneficially away,

its fellow-creatures were suffering. He lived in the

rastice pleasures. He died, Wood thinks, on the 29th April

, 1695, and was buried in the parish-church of darinfried, about two miles from Breckpock

has never received the praise it

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