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TIMOTHY DWIGHT, S. T. D. LL. D.

LATE PRESIDENT OF YALL COLLEGE.

WITH A

MEMOIR

OF

THE LIFE OF THE AUTHOR.

IN FOUR VOLUMES.

NINTH EDITION.

VOL. IV.

NEW HAVEN:
PUBLISHED BY T. DWIGHT & SON,
AND SOLD BY LEAVITT, LORD, & CO.
180 BROADWAY, NEW YORK.

1836.

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CONTENTS OF THE FOURTH VOLUME.

Pag

SERMON CXXXII. The Tenth Commandment. Ambition.-Rom. xii. 16. 5

SERMON CXXXIII. Man's Inability to obey the Law of God.-Rom. viii. 7. 16

SERMON CXXXIV. Faith and Repentance necessary to restore us to Obe.

dience.-Acts xx. 20, 21. - - - - - - 27

SERMON CXXXV. The Means of Grace. The Ordinary Means of Grace.

Proofs that there are such Means.--1 Cor. iv. 15. - - - 38

SERMON CXXXVI. The Ordinary Means of Grace. What they are; and

what is their Influence.-1 Cor. iv. 15. - .

SERMON CXXXVII. The Ordinary Means of Grace. Objections an-

swered.-1 Cor. iv. 15.

- - - -

SERMON CXXXVIII. The Ordinary Means of Grace. Hearing the Word

of God.—Luke viji. 18.

- - - - - -

SERMON CXXXIX. The Ordinary Means of Grace. The Nature, Seasons,

and Obligations of Prayer.—1 Thess. v. 17. .

SERMON CXL. The Ordinary Means of Grace. The Usefulness of Prayer

to Individuals.—1 Thess. v. 17. .

- . - 96

SEPMON CXLI. The Ordinary Means of Grace. The Usefulness of Prayer

to Families.-Eph. vi. 10.

- . 108

SERMON CXLII. The Ordinary Means of Grace. The Usefulness of Prayer

to Communities.-Psalm xxiii. 28. - - - . . 122

SERMON CXLIII. The Ordinary Means of Grace. The objections to

Prayer considered.Job xxi. 15. . . . . . 134

SERMON CXLIV. The Ordinary Means of Grace. Forms of Prayer.-

Mall. vi. 9–13.

- - - - - - . 144

SERMON CXLV. The Ordinary Means of Grace. Intercourse with Reli-

gious Men.—Pror. xiii. 20. - - - - - - 167

SERMON CXLVI. The Ordinary Means of Grace. Religious Meditation,

Pror. iv. 26. . . . . . . . . 171

SERMON CXLVII. The Ordinary Means of Grace. The Duty of Educating

Children religiously. Objections.--Prov. xxii. 6. - .

182

SERMON CXLVIII. The Ordinary Means of Grace. The Manner in which

Religious Education is to be conducted. Motives to this Duty.—Prov.

IX. 6.

. .

.

. . 193

SERMON CXLIX. The Extraordinary Means of Grace. The Character of

Members of the Church.-2 Cor. vi. 14. . . . . 206

SERMON CL. The Extraordinary Means of Grace. Officers of the Church.

Ministers of the Gospel. Who are Ministers.—1 Pel. v. 1-3. . 221

SERMON CLI. The Extraordinary Means of Grace. Officers of the Church.

Ministers of the Gospel. Who are Ministers.--1 Pet. v. 1-3.

SERMON CLII. The Estraordinary Means of Grace. The End, Nature,

and Subjects of Preaching.–Mallh. xxviii. 19. . . . 246

SERMON CLIII. The Extraordinary Means of Grace. The Manner of

Preaching.–Mallh. xxviii. 19.

- 259

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SERMON CLIV. The Extraordinary Means of Grace. Various duties of

Ministers.—1 Thess. iii. 2. . . . . . . 273

SERMON CLV. The Extraordinary Means of Grace. Officers of the

Church. Deacons.-Acts vi. 1-6. - . . . . 286

SERMON CLVI. The Extraordinary Means of Grace. The Ordinances of

the Church. Baptism. Its Reality and Intention.—Matth. xxviii. 19. 298

SERMON CLVII. The Extraordinary Means of Grace. The Objections

against Infant Baptism answered.Matth. xxviii. 19. · · 312

SERMON CLVIII. The Extraordinary Means of Grace. Direct Arguments

for Infant Baptism.—Matth. xxviii. 19.

. . . 324

SERMON CLIX. The Extraordinary Means of Grace. No Infants but the

Children of Believers, proper subjects of Baptism. Mode of Adminis.

tration.-Acts ii. 38, 39. . . . . .

SERMON CLX. The Extraordinary Means of Grace. The Lord's Supper;

Its Nature and Design. The Qualifications of Communicants.—Mark

xiv. 22–25. - .

-

- - 355

SERMON CLXI. The Extraordinary Means of Grace. The Lord's Supper.

Disposition with which it is to be attended; and Motives to the Attend-

ance.—Mark xiv. 22–25. - - - - - - 370

SERMON CLXII. The Extraordinary Means of Grace. The Discipline of

the Church.—Matth. xviii. 15—18. -

386

SERMON CLXIII. Death.-Ps. xc. 3. . . . . . 403

SERMON CLXIV. The immediate Consequences of Death.—Eccl. xii, 7. 417

SERMON CLXV. The Remoter Conseqiiences of Death. The Resurrec-

tion.-1 Cor. xv. 16. - - - - • • • 430

SERMON CLXVI. The Remoter Consequences of Death. The Final

Judgment.—2 Pet. ii. 10. . . . . . . 442

SERMON CLXVII. The Remoter Consequences of Death. The Punishment

of the Wicked. Its duration. Matth. XXV. 46. - . . 466

SERMON CLXVIII, The Remoter Consequences of Death. The Punish-

ment of the Wicked. Its Nature.-2 Pet. ii. 12. - . .

SERMON CLXIX. The Remoter Consequences of Death. The Rewards of

the Righteous. The New Creation.—2 Pet. iii. 13. . . . 477

SERMON CLXX. The Remoter Consequences of Death. The Happiness

of Heaven.—Rev. xxi. 1–3. - . . . - - 487

SERMON CLXXI. The Remoter Consequences of Death. The Happiness

of Heaven-Rev. xxi. 1-3. . - -

. 500

SERMON CLXXII. Conclusion. General Remarks.—Prov. viii. 6.

613

SERMON CLXXIII. Conclusion. General Remarks.—Prov. viii. 6. 623

Index.

- . - - - - - - - 537

SERMON CXXXII.

TENTH COMMANDMENT.-AMBITION.

Romans xii. 16.—Mind not high things.

THE subject of the preceding discourse, you may remember, tas Atarice. In the present, I shall consider the other great exercise of a covetous spirit, viz. Imbilion.

Ambition is an aflection of the mind, ncarly related to Pride and Vanity. Vanity is the self-complacency, which we feel in the consciousness of being superior to others. Pride is the same selfcomplacency, united with a contempt for those, whom we consider as our inferiors. Ambition is the desire of obtaining, or increasirg, this superiority. Vanity, usually makes men civil and coma plaisant. Pride, renders them rude, imperious, and overbcaring. l'anity, chiefly subjects men to the imputation of weakness; and excites mingled emotions of pity and contempt. Pride, is often altoaded with a kind of repulsive dignity; is rather scea to be deserting of contempt, than realized as the object of it; sometimes awakens awe; and always creates hatred and loathing. Vain mea are always ambitious; proud men generally; but they sometimes appear satisfied with iheir present envied superiority to all arcund them. Ambitious men are frequently vain, and sooner or later are always proud. Vanity rests chiefly on personal attributes. Pride, in addition to these, fastens on every thing, which is supposed to create distinction.

This love of superiority is the most remarkable exercise of Corelousness; and, united with the discontentment and envy, by which it is regularly accompanied, appears to constitute the principal corruption of the human mind. It is impossible, without wonder, to observe the modes, in which mankind exercise it; and the objects, in which it finds its gratification. They are of every kind; and are found every where. We are proud and vain of whatever, in our own view, raises us above others; whether a gift of nature, an attainmcuit of our own, or a more accident. Our pride and vanity are excited by the possession of personal beauty, strength, or agility ; by a lively imagination, clear judgment, and tenderness of feeling; by patrimonial wealth, and distinction of family; by the fact, that we live in the same neighbourhood, or even in the same country, with persons of eminence; that we know them; or even that we have seen them. No less commonly are we proud and vain of bodily feats, graceful motions, and

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