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CHAPTER II

Fair Basis of Settlement in the Propositions of the Peate Cunimente: bez ties a

carried only by bare Majorities - The Critseagra Descends. - De Committee
Thirteen-Mr. Toombs's Statemeestefits Spirit-Yz. Dougins on the Bests.-.
Crittenden's Opinion of their feet, bad they been sontzi - Part sai Mt.
Douglas, as to the readiness of Mr. Davis ad X. Tocents to start them, I agreed
to by the Republican Members-Resolatiess slready regented by the Fouse 106 in
the Senate, by a Majority of One, Vr. Seward set Foting-t'he tro-Suris Tote
necessary to give them Efect could not have been obtained, had the Southern
Senators been present.—Mr. Douglas's Statesest that many of the Reputāces Leaders

desired Dissolution and War.-Wr. Everett's Letter, Febrnery sa 1361 - the
"Union” Meeting at Faneuil Hall, in Opposition to Coercise "sad stating the Party

Obstacles to Adjustment-Certain Anti-Abolition Resolations press the House-Tbe

Faint-heartedness of the Class of Republicsa Leaders who were Caion Ves, bet stråd

of breaking up their Party, prevented the Settlement,

CHAPTER XI.

Inauguration of Mr. Lincoln. His Character. The Grand Question at the Time how to

avoid War.—Mr. Everett's Favorable Position to judge, and his Opinion -Resolutions of

a pacific Spirit pass the House by a two-thirds Vote too late, but not acted upon in the

Senate.-The Inaugural Address.—The Purpose only to maintain and defend the
Union.-A Disavowal of any Intent to use Force.-The Policy temporizing and coz-

.

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Mr. Buchanan's History of his Administration. His embarrassing Position. Unanimous

Vote of Approbation by the Legislature of Massachusetts.-Anxious Waiting for the

Meeting of Congress.-A“ John Brown” Incident in Boston.-Official Opinion upon

“Coercion," of the Attorney-General of the United States.-Conciliatory Propositions

in the Albany Journal, a leading Republican Paper in the Interest of Mr. Seward. -

Upon Motion of Mr. Boteler, of Virginia, a Committee of One from each State (83)

appointed, to consider and report upon " the present Perilous Condition of the Coun

try.”—Mr. Powell, of Kentucky, moves in the Senate for a Committee of Thirteen.-

Proposition of Mr. Andrew Johnson in the Senate.-Speech of Mr. Wade, of Ohio.-

He does not "so much blame the People of the South.”—Allusion to the Speech by

Mr. Nicholson, of Tennessee, in the House.--Mr. Crittenden, of Kentucky, offers

Resolutions.-Extracts from Speeches of Mr. Andrew Johnson.-Great Number of

Memorials in favor of the Crittenden Resolutions.—Opinion of Mr. Pugh, Senator from

Ohio, of the Popular Vote in their favor, had they been adopted by Congress. The

New York World (Rep.) on the Effect of “one Word that way" from Mr. Seward. -

Strong Statement of Boston Daily Advertiser (Rep.) as to Popular Aversion to a War.

- Changes of Feeling.—The New York Tribune against a “Reactionary Spirit" for

Union. -Resolution of Mr. Clark, Senator from New Hampshire, to defeat the Critten-

den Propositions.—Mr. Seward disappoints Public Expectation by his Vote. His

Speech.-Its Effect.—The “Conservative ” Republican Journals become quasi radical.

-Statement of Mr. Wilson, Senator from Massachusetts.--Mr. Sumner, Senator from

Massachusetts, on " the Barbarism of Slavery.”The “Irrepressible Conflict.”—Inter-

position of Virginia.—The Appointment of Commissioners to the “Peace Conference."

-Messrs. Shurz, Chandler, and Bingham.-Mr. Chase on this Subject. --The Spirit of

the Radicals.--The Conference.-Its Propositions,

Page 894

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CHAPTER XX,

Inauguration of Mr. Lincoln. His Character.—The Grand Question at the Time how to

avoid War. Mr. Everett's Favorable Position to judge, and his Opinion.-Resolutions of

a pacific Spirit pass the House by a two-thirds Vote too late, but not acted upon in the

Senate.-The Inaugural Address.—The Purpose only to maintain and defend the

Union.-A Disavowal of any Intent to use Force.—The Policy temporizing and con.

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